Courses

Please check with the BSE Handbook which mandatory courses you have to choose in your PhD track. Not all courses listed here can be approved as Core Courses for all BSE PhD tracks.

Instructor:
Friday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Description:

The objective of this course is that students are able to (i) understand and critically evaluate seminal research in accounting and (ii) use these skills to develop an exposé for a research project that has the potential to contribute to extant literature. The course entails group discussions of seminal papers that identify fundamental questions in accounting research and that use innovative methods to address such questions.

Students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) actively participating during the reading group sessions and (ii) writing and presenting an exposé for a research project.

Enrolment into the Accounting Reading Group is possible at the beginning of each semester. Maximum number of participants: 20

Registration: via Email to Ulf Brüggemann (u.bruggemann@hu-berlin.de) until April 12, 2021.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 204
Description:

The objective of this course is that students are able to (i) understand and critically evaluate seminal research in accounting and (ii) use these skills to develop an exposé for a research project that has the potential to contribute to extant literature.
The course entails group discussions of seminal papers that identify fundamental questions in accounting research and that use innovative methods to address such questions.

Literature:
Relevant literature will be provided during the term.

Exam:
Grades will be based on (i) active participation during the reading group sessions and (ii) an exposé for a research project.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 08:30am to 10:00am at online
Wednesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Thursday, 08:30am to 10:00am at online
Description:

The module Advanced Data Analytics for Management Support (ADAMS) introduces students to the latest developments in the scope of data-driven management support. It covers relevant theories and concepts in machine learning against the background of concrete real-world applications in management science. Special emphasize is given to the analysis of textual data and other forms of complex data such as sequences or images. Corresponding data is typically approached using the framework of deep artificial neural networks. The module recognizes the importance of deep learning and elaborates on corresponding methodologies. Frameworks and practices to use advanced (deep) machine learning technology and deploy corresponding solutions are of critical importance and will be elaborated in tutorial sessions.

The topics covered in the module include but are not limited to:

  • Fundamentals of artificial neural networks
  • Recurrent and convolutional neural networks for sequential data processing
  • Fundamentals of natural language processing(NLP)
  • Text embedding and language models
  • Sentiment Analysis
  • Approaches for NLP transfer learning

The module is designed as a follow-up to the module Business Analytics and Data Science (BADS). We expect students to have completed that module prior to taking ADAMS. More specifically, it is strongly recommended to join this module with a solid understanding of (supervised) machine learning practices and algorithms. Some experience in Python programming is also expected since we use the Python programming language in tutorials. The grading of the module will be based on a practical assignment, which also involves Python programming.

Literature:

A Zhang, ZC Lipton, M Li, AJ Smola (2020) Dive into Deep Learning, interactive deep learning book with code. https://d2l.ai/

Exam:

Term paper

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=94480

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

The module Advanced Data Analytics for Management Support (ADAMS) introduces students to the latest developments in the scope of data-driven management support. It covers relevant theories and concepts in machine learning against the background of concrete real-world applications in management science. Special emphasize is given to the analysis of textual data and other complex data such as sequences or images. Corresponding data is typically approached using the framework of deep artificial neural networks. The module recognizes the importance of deep learning and elaborates on corresponding methodologies. Frameworks and practices to use advanced (deep) machine learning technology and deploy corresponding solutions are of critical importance.

Topics covered in the module include but are not limited to:

  • Fundamentals of artificial neural networks
  • Recurrent networks for sequential data processing with applications in finance
  • Convolutional neural networks
  • Generative models and adversarial learning
  • Fundamentals of textual data analysis
  • Neural network-based text embeddings: word2vec and cousins
  • Approaches for topic modeling and sentiment analysis
  • A primer in reinforcement learning

The module draws on the concepts and practices covered in Business Analytics & Data Science (BADS). Successful completion of BADS is a prerequisite to take this module.

The module makes use of the Python programming language. Fundamentals of machine learning in Python will be covered in the first weeks of the tutorial sessions. However, students must be prepared to invest a sizeable about of time into self-study to internalize relevant programming skills and gain the experience needed for subsequent tutorials. The grading of the module will be based on a practical assignment, which also involves Python programming.

Exam:

Practical assignment: develop learning model to solve real-world problem and document solution in a term paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 08:30am to 10:00am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 202
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

This course provides a rigorous review of basic linear regression and techniques both for cross-sectional and panel applications. The course then covers further topics which are important in applied econometric analysis based on individual level data and longitudinal data. The topics include diff-in-diff-event-study designs, IV with heterogeneous potential outcomes, clustering and serial correlation in standard errors in panels, bandwidth and kernel choices in RDD, synthetic controls, selected topics of spatial econometrics (measures of spatial concentration and autocorrelation, estimation of causal effects over space, point pattern analysis), quantile regression methods, and simulation. The course will regularly discuss the causal interpretation of econometric estimates. The focus of the course is both on understanding the methodological concepts and on how to apply them. Students will learn to implement the estimation methods using the econometric package Stata. Besides a number of journal articles, two textbooks will be useful as readings alongside the course: Wooldridge's textbook on “Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data”, and Angrist and Pischkes "Mosly Harmless Econometrics".

Literature:
Wooldridge, J. M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (see also http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/econometric-analysis-cross-section-and-panel-data).
Angrist, J. and Pischke, J-S (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion. Princeton University Press.
Further reading recommendations you will get during the lecture.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 08:30am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

This course provides students with the neccessary background to understand modern academic research in finance and to pursue their own finance-related research projects. It covers principles of asset pricing, financial intermediation and corporate finance. The course covers both empirics and theory. More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=95193

The course is a mandatory Core Course in the PhD track in Finance. It can also be attended as an Elective Course for the PhD tracks in Accounting, Economics or Management. The course will be useful for any PhD student aiming to pursue a research career that touches on finance-related topics, e.g., at universities, business schools, central banks, financial regulators.

Evaluation:

Master students: Final exam
PhD students: Final exam and presentation

Literature:

Jean Tirole, “The Theory of Corporate Finance”, (2006), Princeton University Press
John Cochrane, "Asset Pricing", Princeton University Press, 2nd Edition

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 08:00am to 12:00pm at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 4.05
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

This course covers the main areas in finance: corporate finance, financial intermediation, asset pricing, and investments.

Prerequisite:
Microeconomics I (PhD); knowledge of: choice under uncertainty, moral hazard, adverse selection, signalling, basic matrix algebra, panel data econometrics

Evaluation:
Final exam and presentation (PhD students only)

Literature:
Jean Tirole, “The Theory of Corporate Finance”, (2006), Princeton University Press John Cochrane, "Asset Pricing", Princeton University Press, 2nd Edition

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Thursday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Description:

The Marshallian paradigm of the labor market and the foundations of labor demand and labor supply; human capital; wage determination; labor market imperfections and institutional constraints; introduction to search theory.

Literature:

Pierre Cahuc, Stéphane Carcillo and André Zylberberg, Labor Economics, 2nd edition (MIT Press, 2014) ISBN: 9780262027700;
Tito Boeri and Jan van Ours, The Economics of Imperfect Labor Markets, 2nd edition (Princeton University Press, 2013) ISBN: 9780691158938;
Course “Script”

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: tba

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 08:30am to 12:00pm at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Lecture Hall 108a
Wednesday, 08:30am to 12:00pm at TU Berlin, Main Building, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Lecture Hall t.b.a.
Description:

Lectures by M. Trabandt (from April 15 to May 27):

Please contact Mathias Trabandt via email if you would like to attend his online course. He will provide more information on how to attend.

Advanced macroeconomics, search and matching labor markets, model solution and estimation techniques.
More information will be provided in March 2020 at https://www.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/en/fachbereich/vwl/trabandt/Teaching-Prof_-Trabandt/Current-Semester/Teaching-by-Prof_-Trabandt/index.html
Venue: Freie Universität Berlin, Lecture Hall 108a, Garystr. 21, 14195 Berlin

Lectures by F. Heinemann (from June 3 to July 15):

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on F. Heinemann's website at TU Berlin

This part of the course covers topics such as growth, determinacy of the price level, bubbles, equilibrium multiplicity, strategic uncertainty, and current limits of DSGE models.
More information will be provided at http://www.macroeconomics.tu-berlin.de/menue/teaching_lehre/adv_macroeconomics_ii/
Venue: TU Berlin, Main Building, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Lecture Hall t.b.a.

Literature: will be announced during the lectures

Exam: midterm and final exam

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Thursday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Description:

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms' objectives and marketing activities. In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms' objectives. In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data. Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Exam:

Portfolio exam: 3 assignments

  1. assignment: learn and understand how to use the statistical package R for data prepration and data analysis (non-graded)
  2. assignment: learn and understand how to estimate price elasticities and promotional uplifts with log-log-models applying modern econometric tools, make use of modern statistical software packages and learn how to document and interpret the estimation results carefully.
  3. assignment: learn and understand how to estimate parameters of an aggregate logit demand models using of modern statistical software packages and learn how to document and interpret the results from these models carefully.

The final grade will be given for the portfolio of all three assignments.

More information can be found on Moodle: tba

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Tuesday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start by a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is at center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Literature:

Galí, Jordi (2015): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle, Princeton University Press.
Further literature: see Moodle

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=104076

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Monday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start with a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Literature:

Galí, Jordi (2015): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle, second edition, Princeton University Press.

Further literature: see Moodle

Exam:

written exam, 90 min

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 08:30am to 10:00am at online
Friday, 12:15pm to 01:45pm at online
Description:

This course focuses on the current workhorse models and solution methods in international macroeconomics. The goal of the course is to provide students with the tools to read and replicate papers from the current literature and start their own research projects in the field. The first part of the course stays close to the book by Uribe and Schmitt-Grohe (henceforth USG, see citation below). This part will take up two thirds of the term. In the last third of the term we will branch off to cover some topics based on recent influential research papers. The course will cover the following topics, concepts and numerical methods. The pace of the course and focus on particular topics might be adjusted to participants' progress and interests.

Topics: International business cycles; nominal and real exchange rates; capital flows and reversals; exchange rate policies; financial stability and macroprudential policies; sovereign default; monetary unions

Concepts: Open endowment and production economies; nominal rigidities and unemployment; limited commitment; financial frictions; pecuniary externalities; social planner and constrained efficiency; equilibrium multiplicity

Numerical methods: Local solution methods (linearization and perturbation); interpolation; global solution methods with a focus on occasionally binding constraints (value function iteration, policy function iteration and parameterized expectations)

Literature:

The main textbook for the course is:
Uribe, M. and Schmitt-Grohe, S. (2017) Open Economy Macroeconomics, Princeton University Press.
Further literature in the form of published research papers will be provided during the semester.

Exam:

Witten exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=103416

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 08:15am to 11:45am at online
Description:

One of the drivers of firm performance is an understanding of the behavior and motivation of its employees. This course is for advanced Master and Ph.D. students interested in deepening their knowledge of managerial and personnel economics. It continues the discussion from the Personnel Economics and Incentives in Organization courses. It focuses on the intersection of behavioral, experimental, and empirical studies about the impact of organizational practices (e.g., incentives, leadership, hierarchy, communication) on employee behavior. In particular, this course is about the HR and behavioral determinants of firm performance.

One of the key elements of successful management is asking and answering the right questions. In this seminar, students read selected economic papers, identify their research questions, critically examine them, and engage in scientific discourse with fellow course participants. The students elaborate their ideas in a group, develop them further into research proposals, write an essay, and hold a presentation in front of the course audience.

The seminar aims to develop students in three specific ways. First, students will learn about state-of-the-art research results from personnel economics and acquire knowledge helpful in
their prospective management career. Second, the students will deepen their skills of critical thinking and thoughtful evaluation of (i) management practices; and (ii) empirical evidence
from the field of personnel management. Third, the seminar will provide guidance and practice in conducting research and writing a research paper.

The students pursue these goals through a mixture of lectures, discussions, hands-on exercises, individual and group work, and student presentations.

Class hours and place

On Fridays: 16.4.2021, 30.4.2021, 28.5.2021, 11.6.2021, 25.6.2021, and 9.7.2021
Always from 8:15 am till 11:45 am.

Because the course is cumulative and builds on the content discussed in the first sessions, joining the seminar will not be allowed after the first class on 16th of April. Registered participants are expected to attend all sessions and participate in all group activities!

The seminar takes place in the seminar room **tba** or online. In the case of a ‘digital semester’ due to the pandemic, all meetings will take place via zoom during the same time slots.

Please register to the seminar by sending an email to Christine Jahnke (mktg@wiwi.hu-berlin.de) until 22nd of March, 2021.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday, 11:30am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
Description:

Leadership in innovative organizations: What does experimental and behavioural economics teach us about how to “deepen” agile work? In this seminar we will discuss what companies can learn from behavioural and experimental economics about the human resource management. The focus of the seminar will lie on recent trends of modern workplace and workflow arrangements and challenges they may bring for employees productivity (e.g., hyper connectivity, agile work, team work etc.). We will search for and discuss the empirical studies from the lab and the field. By doing so, we will review the key concepts of scientific writing. The participants will develop their own research question and experimental design. An extensive feedback will be provided by the tutor and other seminar participants. The format of this seminar crucially relies on the vivid exchange of ideas and thoughts among its participants in form of discussions and presentations. Therefore, the participants should be motivated to attend all sessions, take an active part in group discussions, and present their ideas in front of the group, and write a seminar paper.

Course times and venue:
17.04.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
30.04.2020: 14:00-18:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
29.05.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
05.06.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
19.06.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
26.06.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
17.07.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a

Please register with Anastasia Danilov until March 15, 2020, via email to anastasia.danilov@hu-berlin.de.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Tuesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.

In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA.

Literature:
Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York. Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 04:00pm to 08:00pm at online
Description:

Learning objectives: Students gain knowledge of recent advances in migration economics, particularly applied empirical analyses in the intersection of migration, economic development, political economy and labor economics with a focus on migration based changes in preferences, norms, and values in host and home communities. They are able to critically evaluate research on these topics and assess strengths and weaknesses of causal claims in economics papers. Students are equipped to present papers in an academic setting. The students are able to identify gaps in the literature and develop research proposals that are empirically sound and add to the body of work in migration economics in a meaningful way.

Preconditions: The module “Econometric Methods” or equivalent knowledge is recommended.

Lecture: What is the effect of migration on cultural change? In this course, we will look at the effects of international and regional migration on the economic and cultural dynamics at the destination and the origin countries. Synthesizing the conclusions of a number of seminal studies in the field and analyzing their empirical strategies, we will identify and critically evaluate various channels through which migration can alter the political economy and the economic development of sending and receiving countries.

Exercise: Topics to be covered include: Instrumental variable methods, differences-in-differences, regression discontinuity design and other empirical strategies. There will be deep-dives into various papers, where students prepare referee reports.

Exam:

Portfolio exam: The first assignment is to draft referee reports for several research papers (each about 300 words). The second assignment is to give a presentation on one research paper and give one presentation of a paper critique. The third assignment is to draft an original research proposal (about 2,500 words) related to the field of migration and cultural economics. The final grade will be given/will be awarded for the portfolio of all three assignments.

Or written exam (90 min).

The form of examination will be announced by Mrs. Sardoschau at the beginning of the semester.

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=104095

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday, 04:00pm to 08:00pm at online
Description:

What is the effect of migration on economic development? In this course, we will look at the effects of international and regional migration on the diffusion of knowledge, the integration of countries into global markets through trade and FDI, as well as other diaspora externalities relevant to economic development. Synthesizing the conclusions of a number of seminal studies in the field and analyzing their empirical strategies, we will identify and critically evaluate various channels through which migration can alter the economic development of sending and receiving countries. There will be deep-dives into various papers, where students prepare referee reports and presentations on migration and development economics. The module “Econometric Methods” or equivalent knowledge is recommended. “Applied Migration and Cultural Economics” is a plus.

Given the ongoing pandemic situation, this semester the course will take place online. More information about access to the course platform will be uploaded after October 15th.

Literature:
Reading list will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Exam:
Portfolio exam (referee reports, presentations, term paper) or written exam (90 min.). This will be decided depending on the size of the class.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 02:15pm to 05:30pm at online
Description:

The course will provide an introduction to the core concepts of auction theory. The learning experience will be enriched with case studies from auctions in the lab and in the field. Successful participants can solve optimal-bidding problems in standard auction forms, using advanced mathematical techniques. They first model the informational environment in a given application, using probability theory, and, second, use optimization theory to find optimal bidding strategies. Insights from mechanism design will enable them to design and solve novel auction formats. They learn to model both roles in seller-buyer environments.

Literature:

Vijay Krishna - Auction Theory, Academic Press, 2009

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found here: https://www.mikro.tu-berlin.de/menue/studium_und_lehre/uebersicht/auction_theory/

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

More information on how to participate in the online course is provided in TU Berlin's ISIS portal. The first lecture will be on April 21. The time slots for lectures and sessions remain as scheduled.

The course will provide an introduction to the core concepts of auction theory. The learning experience will be enriched with case studies from auctions in the lab and in the field. Successful participants can solve optimal-bidding problems in standard auction forms, using advanced mathematical techniques. They first model the informational environment in a given application, using probability theory, and, second, use optimization theory to find optimal bidding strategies. Insights from mechanism design will enable them to design and solve novel auction formats. They learn to model both roles in seller-buyer environments.

Optimal bidding in single-unit auctions with symmetric independent private values: First-price auctions, second-price auctions, all-pay auctions; the revenue-equivalence theorem; risk-averse bidders; asymmetric bidders; optimal auctions and mechanism design; interdependent values, multi-unit auctions. 

Exam:

There will be a 90-minutes exam at the end of the course that students need to pass. In addition, PhD students are required to either write a short term paper presenting an own research idea that is related to the topic of the course or present in class a recent (working/discussion) paper related to the course. In the presentation, the paper’s contribution to the literature has to be evaluated critically. The course will be successfully completed if the exam and the term paper/presentation are each graded with 4.0 or better. The final grade for the course will be the average of the two grades.

Literature:

The class is mainly based on Vijay Krishna - Auction Theory, Academic Press, 2009

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 04:00pm to 05:15pm at online
Description:

The Berlin Applied Micro Seminar (BAMS) is a weekly seminar, jointly organized by BSE-partner institutions, the Berlin Centre for Consumer Policies (BCCP) and the SFB TRR 190.
See the following web page for topics, locations and further information: https://sites.google.com/site/berlinappliedmicroseminar/

Literature:
none

Criteria to award ECTS:
none

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 04:00pm to 05:15pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22
Description:

The Berlin Applied Micro Seminar (BAMS) is a weekly seminar, jointly organized by DIW Berlin, Hertie School of Governance, HU Berlin, WZB, the Berlin Centre for Consumer Policies (BCCP) and the SFB TRR 190.

Literature:
none

Criteria to award ECTS:
none

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at WZB, Reichpietschufer 50, 10785 Berlin, room D112/113
Description:

In this reading group, we will discuss current research in behavioral and experimental economics with a focus on developing own research ideas. Participants are expected to lead the discussion of an article 2-3 times per semester (depending on the number of participants) and are encouraged to relate the discussed papers to their own research and to identify open questions that they might work on in their future research. By joining the reading group, students can commit to read and discuss interesting research each week and benefit from a cooperative environment where we help each other to understand details and to identify the gist of a paper.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
at online
Description:

This student-led reading group covers a diverse selection of recently published and unpublished work in behavioral economics and related fields. Its goal is to familiarize participants with current topics and methods in behavioral economics and expand critical thinking abilities with respect to research papers. Each week, students meet to discuss a selected paper. One participant is in charge of leading the discussion on a rotational basis, but all participants are expected to have read the paper in detail.

The reading group is is primarily targeted towards second year PhD students, but also open to other groups. It is recommended that participants have a grasp of core concepts of behavioral economics and are familiar with techniques in (experimental) data analysis.

Exact time slot will be jointly decided upon by reading group attendees.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

To attend the reading group, please register with Hedda Nielsen (nielsenh@hu-berlin.de) and Julia Baumann (julia.baumann@hu-berlin.de).

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Description:

Please send an email to Müge Süer (sueermue@hu-berlin.de) to register for this course.

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=100347

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 03:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Description:

The Berlin Behavioral Economics Colloquium and Seminar are a joint effort between DIW, WZB, HU Berlin and TU Berlin (in cooperation with CRC TRR 190) with the aim of fostering the exchange between active researchers in the areas of behavioral and experimental economics.

For further information, see https://www.bccp-berlin.de/events/berlin-behavioral-economics-seminar/

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 03:00pm to 06:00pm at WZB, Reichpietschufer 50, room B001
Description:

The Berlin Behavioral Economics Colloquium and Seminar are a joint effort between DIW, WZB, HU Berlin and TU Berlin (in cooperation with CRC TRR 190) with the aim of fostering the exchange between active researchers in the areas of behavioral and experimental economics.

The 2020 summer semester series will be held at WZB, Reichpietschufer 50, 10785 Berlin, room B001, on Thursdays from 3:00-4:15 pm and 4:45-6:00 pm unless otherwise stated.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 04:30pm to 05:45pm at online
Description:

This term the Berlin micro theory group organizes a joint online seminar series with the University of Bonn. The seminar takes place on Wednesdays during the semester from 16:30-17:45.

The seminar series is supported by the Berlin Centre for Consumer Policies (BCCP) and by the CRC TRR 190 on Rationality and Competition.

For the program: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/Professorships/vwl/microeconomics/research/MicroTheory
More information can also be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=103736#section-1

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Instructor:
Description:

More information on a potential online format of the seminar will be announced on Moodle.

This is the Berlin-wide micro theory seminar where outward guest presents their current research.

Requirements for credits:
documented attendance (no grade)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 12:30pm to 02:00pm at online
Description:

Ongoing research of graduate students in the field of labor market and macro economy is presented and discussed.

Literature:
none

Criteria to award ECTS:
none

Credits:
4.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday, 12:30pm to 02:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

Ongoing research of graduate students in the field of labor market and macro economy is presented and discussed.

Credits:
4.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday, 03:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Description:

Many economists spend much of their lives in front of a computer, analysing data or simulating economic models. Surprisingly few of them have ever been taught how to do this well. Class exposure to programming languages is most often limited to mastering Stata, Matlab, EViews, etc. just well enough in order to perform simple tasks like running a basic regression. However, these skills do not scale up in a straightforward manner to handle complex projects such as a master's thesis, a research paper, or typical work in government or private business settings. As a result, economists spend their time wrestling with software, instead of doing work, but have no idea how reliable or efficient their programs are.

This course is designed to help fill in this gap. It is aimed at PhD students who expect to write their theses in a field that requires modest to heavy use of computations. Examples include applied microeconomics, econometrics, macroeconomics, computational economics - any field that either involves real-world data; or that does not generally lead to models with simple closed-form solutions.

We will introduce students to programming methods that will substantially reduce their time spent programming while at the same time making their programs more dependable and their results reproducible without extra effort. The course draws extensively on some simple techniques that are the backbone of modern software development, which most economists are simply not aware of. It shows the usefulness of these techniques for a wide variety of economic and econometric applications by means of hands-on examples.

The course will be held online on various days between March 15 and April 9, 2021.

More information on course contents etc. can be found in the attached syllabus.

The number of course participants is limited to 16 (there will be a waiting list). Please register via email to bse.office@hu-berlin.de until March 3, 2021. With your registration, please also send 2 to 4 sentences about your motivation to attend the course (e.g. about one of your projects you want to improve with the help of this course). Please note that only students who wish to attend the whole course, i.e. students who want to work on their own project and get graded, can attend the course.

Credits:
4.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday, 03:45pm at DIW Berlin
Description:

In this reading group, we will discuss current research in economics of climate policy in relation to the main topics of current activity of the Climate Policy department at DIW Berlin, i.e., policies for industrial decarbonization, electricity markets design, policies for renewables and sustainable finance. After an introductory meeting, each meeting will focus on one of the mentioned topics and will be coordinated by the post-doc in the team that works on this topic. In each of the meetings, one student will present one paper on the topic (30 min), as chosen from a shortlist of relevant papers and communicated in advance to all participants. The presentation is then followed by group discussion on the paper and put in relation to the broader research agenda of the post-doc and her/his colleagues and to current policy debates. Depending on the interest of participants, more sessions can be added on selected issues.

Please find more information in the attached syllabus.

Please contact the organizers (email addresses mentioned in the syllabus) for more information on time and venue of the reading group.

Credits:
3.00
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Tuesday, 08:30am to 10:00am at online
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Description:

This course deals with advanced estimation techniques in modern econometrics. In the first part we study Pesudo-ML and GMM as extremum estimation problems with special attention to asymptotic theory and the weak instruments problem. The second part covers non- and semi-parametric topics including the bootstrap, density estimation, and non- and semi-parametric regression. The third part covers the concept of econometric identification, and possible frameworks to write down and interpret causal estimands (treatment effects). We also discuss a number of techniques for estimation of treatment effects (IV, Diff-and-Diff, RDD, Matching).

Literature:

tba

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=102843

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday, 11:15am at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall or online
Description:

In this seminar, the participants shall prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the ongoing Corona crisis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (e.g. various fiscal and monetary policies, but also related to the labour market and social and family policies) and their effects and effectiveness. The effectiveness should take into account a short run as well as a long run perspective. How will the crisis and the policy responses to it change the functioning of the economy and society in the long run? How has the crisis changed our understanding of the functioning of economy and society? The paper can be empirical or theoretical. While it should have a strong policy focus, it should also explicitly build on the academic literature.

Part of the Seminar: Ungraded presentation and discussion.

Course times:

To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

April 27, 2021 10:00-13:00
April 29, 2021 10:00-13:00
July 7, 2021 10:00-14:00
July 8, 2021 10:00-14:00

Restriction to participation: 20

Registration:

29.03.2021 - 01.04.2021 via email to mfratzscher@diw.de (Please indicate your program and matriculation number.)

Exam:

Term paper

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=100266

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 10:00am at online
Description:

Researchers face the challenge to translate their academic results to policy makers and to the public. Often the results are derived using complex models, which are based on strong assumptions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods and skills, which allow to explain the models and the assumptions to policy makers and to the public and to derive results and policy conclusions based on the models. This course provides an introduction to communication of academic research to the public and to evidence based policy consulting.

Prerequisites

A mandatory prerequisite for the course is a completed scientific working paper. This is the basis for the policy paper developed during the class. In addition students need to have an excellent background in theoretical and empirical methods (Required courses are: Econometrics I or II and two courses out of Micro I&II, Macro I&II or ManSci I&II.) The course is designed for PhD students in the second or third year depending on the status of their first research paper.

 

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 10:00am to 11:30am at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58, Karl Popper Room
Description:

Researchers face the challenge to translate their academic results to policy makers and to the public. Often the results are derived using complex models, which are based on strong assumptions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods and skills, which allow to explain the models and the assumptions to policy makers and to the public and to derive results and policy conclusions based on the models. This course provides an introduction to communication of academic research to the public and to evidence based policy consulting.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 08:30am to 10:00am at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 102 or online
Description:

In the first part of the lecture, microeconomically based theoretical and empirical approaches to the economics of education are discussed. In a second part, education economics approaches along the different educational sectors from early childhood to continuing education are discussed. Current empirically based research papers from the individual educational sectors will be presented and discussed.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday, 09:00am to 11:00am at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 107
Wednesday, 11:00am to 12:30pm at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 107
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on FU's Blackboard. Please email Elena Ziege to get access. The first lecture will be held via Webex on April 22, 9:15 am.

In the first part of the lecture, microeconomically based theoretical and empirical approaches to the economics of education are discussed. In a second part, education economics approaches along the different educational sectors from early childhood to continuing education are discussed. Current empirically based research papers from the individual educational sectors will be presented and discussed.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 12:15pm at DIW
Description:

This course aims to introduce the student to current methods in Empirical Industrial Organization (EIO). In the first part of the course, we deal with the structural approach developed in the so called “New Empirical Industrial Organization” (NEIO) framework. After an introductory overview of the historical developments in the field of EIO, we start by looking at techniques for demand estimation in homogeneous and differentiated products markets. We then move to the simultaneous analysis of demand and supply relationships and compare various methods for estimating firms’ market power and strategic interactions based on static game-theoretic models of oligopolistic competition. Next, we focus on analyzing firms’ production decision and discuss structural models to estimate production function and productivity. In the final part of the course, we will look at applications of these techniques to evaluate public policies such as merger control and regulation. We conclude with a discussion of empirical techniques to detect collusion.

Learning Outcomes:
A range of econometric tools has been developed to analyze the behavior of firms and consumers to understand the functioning of markets. This course aims to provide students the ability to formulate, estimate and interpret demand and supply schedules as well as the degree of market power by firms. These are then used to make causal inference on market related policies. A key ingredient of the course is the application of these methods to actual data in programming sessions.
Discussions during the lecture and seminar, a presentation, and several homeworks will help improving the student's research, writing and presentation skills.

Literature:
Berry, Steve and Ariel Pakes, (2003): “Empirical Models of Firms and Markets,” Lecture notes.
Reiss, Peter C. and Frank Wolak, (2008): “Structural Econometric Modeling: Rationales and Examples from Industrial Organization,” in J.J. Heckman and E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 64 Elsevier. (http://www.stanford.edu/~preiss/makeit.pdf).
Ackerberg, Daniel, C. Lanier Benkard, Steve Berry, and Ariel Pakes, (2008): “Econometric Tools for Analyzing Market Outcomes, ” in J.J. Heckman and E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 63 Elsevier. (https://web.stanford.edu/~lanierb/research/tools8l-6-8.pdf).
Angrist J. D. and J.-S.Pischke, (2010): “The Credibility Revolution in Empirical Economics: How Better Research Design is Taking the Con out of Econometrics,” Journal of Economic Perspective, 24, 3-30. (http://econ.lse.ac.uk/staff/spischke/AP%20JEP.pdf)
Einav Liran and Jonathan Levin, (2010): “Empirical Industrial Organization: A Progress Report,” Journal of Economic Perspective, 24, 145-162. (http://www.stanford.edu/~jdlevin/Papers/IO.pdf)
Davidson Russell and James G. MacKinnon, (2004): Econometric Theory and Methods, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Motta, Massimo (2004): Competition Policy. Theory and Practice, Cambridge University Press.

Exam:
The portfolio examination consists of the following elements, adding up to a maximum of 100 credits.
3 homeworks 60%
1 presentation 20%
1 final exam 20%

Time:
Depending on the number of students the course is either offered weekly on Wednesday/Thursday or it will be offered as a block course with 4 two-full-days blocks.

Venue:
Most likely at DIW Berlin. If taught online, more information will be sent to registered participants by the lecturer after Oct 26th.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 03:00pm at online
Description:

How to deal with environmental pollution and overuse of natural resources, like climate change, declining fish stocks or fossil fuel reserves? This course develops an economic perspective on the analysis of and ways to deal with external effects and intertemporal trade-offs – being the root of many public good and open access problems centered around emissions of pollutants and extraction of renewable or non-renewable resources. The course covers a now established literature stemming from an originally neoclassical approach to sustainability problems, and integrates it with complementary approaches, in particular from institutional economics (e.g. the work of Elinor Ostrom), and from systems science.

Participating students follow lectures and discuss topics in seminars on the basic theory, combined with method training in dynamic optimization, game theory and institutional analysis. They team-up in groups to conduct a study on governing a particular self-selected environmental or resource problem.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus and on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=101445

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Thursday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Description:

The course deals with the economic development of Europe from the beginning of the First World War up to the current situation from a historical perspective. Key topics include the economics of the two wars, European hyperinflations, the great depression, the bloc-wise economic integration in Western and Eastern Europe, the Golden Age of Growth, the economics of stagflation, global integration and global imbalances in a long-run perspective.

Literature:

Stephen Broadberry, and Kevin H O'Rourke (eds) (2010) "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe" , Vol 2: 1870 to the Present, Cambridge.

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=95784

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 125
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 125
Description:

The course deals with the economic development of Europe from the beginning of the First World War up to the current situation from a historical perspective. Key topics include the economics of the two wars, European hyperinflations, the great depression, the bloc-wise economic integration in Western and Eastern Europe, the Golden Age of Growth, the economics of stagflation, global integration and global imbalances in a long-run perspective.

Literature:
Stephen Broadberry, and Kevin H O'Rourke (eds) (2010) "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe" , Vol 2: 1870 to the Present, Cambridge.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 10:15am to 11:45am at online
Description:

This course provides advanced insights into experimental methods (laboratory and field experiments), applied in the area of financial and managerial accounting. Based on lectures and the discussion of different papers published in leading accounting journals, students will gain insights into the design, implementation, and statistical analysis of experiments and the interpretation of experimental results. The aim of this course is to endow students with sufficient knowledge to conduct experimental studies with high methodological rigor and to critically evaluate experimental studies in the field of accounting.

It is recommended that participants have passed the core courses and are familiar with fundamental concepts of causal inference and data analysis.

To obtain course credits, students have to present one topic in experimental accounting research and write a research proposal on answering an accounting-based research question with an experimental method (ca. 10.000 characters).

Course registration is open from 5.3.2021-5.4.2021 via Email: maik.lachmann@tu-berlin.de

Literature:

  • Brown/Evans/Moser (2009), “Agency theory and participative budgeting experiments“, Journal of Management Accounting Research, 21: 317-335
  • Libby/Bloomfield/Nelson (2002), “Experimental research in financial accounting”, Accounting, Organizations and Society, 27: 775-810
  • Sprinkle (2003), “Perspectives on experimental research in managerial accounting”, Accounting, Organizations, and Society, 28: 287-318
  • Luft (2016), “Cooperation and competition among employees: Experimental evidence on the role of management control systems”, Management Accounting Research, 31: 75-85
  • Wibbeke/Lachmann (2020), “Psychology in management accounting and control research: an overview of the recent literature”, Journal of Management Control, 31: 275-328.

Exam:

Portfolio: Presentation (50%) & written research proposal (50%)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Description:

This seminar focuses on recent developments in experimental economics. Each weak, students critically discuss one recent paper, with an emphasis on the experimental design and data analysis. A major objective of the course is for students to develop a great deal of familiarity with the design of experiments as a method for economic research. Participants are expected to attend all sessions and participate actively in the discussions.

It is recommended that participants have passed Introduction to Advanced Microeconomic Analysis and are familiar with fundamental concepts of causal inference and data analysis.

To obtain course credits, students have to submit 3 one-pagers (not graded) and write a final referee report (ca. 10.000 characters).

Course registration is open from 1.3.2021-5.4.2021. To register, students should send an email to Dr. Lea Heursen (lea.heursen@hu-berlin.de). In this email, students should write a short paragraph, describing what motivates them to take this seminar. If more than 20 students would like to take this seminar for credit, a lottery will determine the seats.

Exam:

Final referee report

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

Registered students will be informed by the lecturers on how to attend the online course.

This seminar focuses on recent developments in experimental economics. Each weak, students critically discuss one recent paper, with an emphasis on the experimental design and data analysis. A major objective of the course is for students to develop a great deal of familiarity with the design of experiments as a method for economic research. Participants are expected to attend all sessions and participate actively in the discussions.

It is recommended that participants are familiar with fundamental concepts of causal inference and data analysis.

To obtain course credits, students have to submit 3 one-pagers (not graded) and write a final referee report (ca. 10.000 characters).

Course registration is open from 5.3.2020-5.4.2020. To register, students should send an email to Dr. Jana Friedrichsen (jana.friedrichsen@hu-berlin.de) and Dr. Lea Heursen (lea.heursen@hu-berlin.de). In this email, students should write a short paragraph, describing what motivates them to take this seminar. If more than 20 students would like to take this seminar for credit, a lottery will determine the seats.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 08:00am to 06:00pm at tba
Description:

Time frame: 21.09.-24.09.2021, 08:00 – 18:00

Max. no. of participants: 5 from BSE, on top of the VHB participants (VHB course; international doctoral program ProDok)

Please register via email to bse.office@hu-berlin.de until July 15, 2021.

 

Description of course:

Abstract and Learning Objectives

Various robust deviations from rational decision making have been reported such as loss aversion, probability weighting, status quo bias, overconfidence etc. Understanding those deviations leads to a more realistic modelling of the behavior of different economic actors and to an increased prediction success. In this course, participants will understand those and other important deviations from rationality as well as their theoretical explanations/modelling, e.g., prospect theory and mental accounting. Most theories have been developed implementing psychological and economic experiments. Whereas psychological experiments are mostly asking the respondents for hypothetical choices, real decisions with actual monetary payoffs are implemented in economic experiments. Half of the course will be concerned with a profound introduction to the several deviations from rationality that have been reported with real decision makers and with the theoretical treatment of those deviations. The other half of the course will deal with different types of experiments and different experimental designs as well as the matching of research question and type of empirical method to be used.

Content

Whereas the first two days take the form of an interactive lecture and are mostly devoted to laying the basic knowledge in experimental research and behavioral decision theory, the next two days are devoted to specific applications of behavioral decision theory to selected topics in tax compliance, behavioral finance, behavioral insurance, entrepreneurial decisions, venture financing decisions, and consumer behavior. Whereas not all areas of business research are captured in the example studies, the applications are diverse as well as broad enough to have participants from different fields benefit from this course.

 

Selected Literature:

Friedman, D., Sunder, S. (1994): Experimental methods: A primer for economists. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK) and New York (USA).
Gigerenzer, G., Todd, P. M. and the ABC Research Group (1999): Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart. Oxford University Press, Oxford (UK).
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.

 

Essential Reading Material:

Reading Material (lecture)

A study of this part of the literature as well as the literature referenced under “selected literature” is obligatory for all participants.

Camerer, C. F. and Lovallo, D. (1999): Overconfidence and excess entry: An experimental approach. American Economic Review 89, 306-318.
Campbell, D. T. and Stanley, J. C. (1963): Experimental and quasi-experimental designs for research. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston.
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.
Samuelson, W. and Zeckhauser, R. (1988): Status quo bias in decision making. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 1, 7-59.
Sandri, S., Schade, C. D., Mußhoff, O., and Odening, M. (2010): Holding on for too long? - An experimental study on inertia in entrepreneurs' and non-entrepreneurs' disinvestment choices. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 76, 30-44.
Schade, C. D. (2005): Dynamics, experimental economics and entrepreneurship. Journal of Technology Transfer 30, 409-431.
Schade, C. D., Schröder, A., and Krause, K. (2010): Coordination after Gains and Losses: Is Prospect Theory's Value Function Predictive for Games? Journal of Mathematical Psychology 54, 426-445.
Shefrin, H. M. and Statman, M. (1985): The disposition to sell winners too early and ride losers too long: theory and evidence. Journal of Finance 40, 777-792.
Thaler, R. H. (1985): Mental accounting and consumer choice. Marketing Science 4, 199-214.

Reading Material (seminar)

Whereas it is assumed that everyone is having a deeper look into all of the following articles, each of the participants should prepare two or three of these papers intensively and be prepared to present the respective paper, discuss it, and formulate future research opportunities based on that paper. The presenters of the respective papers are fixed during the first seminar session (day 1).

Camerer, C. F. and Lovallo, D. (1999): Overconfidence and excess entry: An experimental approach. American Economic Review 89, 306-318.
Chan, C. S. R., & Park, H. D. (2015): How images and color of business plans influence venture investment screening decisions. Journal of Business Venturing 30, 732-748.
Charness, G. Gneezy, U. (2010): Portfolio Choice and Risk attitudes: An Experiment. Economic Inquiry 48, 133-146.
Franke, N., Gruber, M., Harhoff, D., Henkel, J. (2006): What you are is what you like: similarity biases in venture capitalists' evaluations of start-up teams. Journal of Business Venturing 21, 802-826.
Hallsworth, M., List, J., Metcalfe, R., Vlaev, I. (2014) (NBER Working Paper No. 20007): The Behavioralist As Tax Collector: Using Natural Field Experiments to Enhance Tax Compliance.
Koellinger, P., Minniti, M., and Schade, C. (2007): “I think I can, I think I can”: Overconfidence and entrepreneurial behavior. Journal of Economic Psychology 28, 502-527.
Schade, C., Kunreuther, H. C., and Koellinger, P. (2012): Protecting Against Low-Probability Disasters: The Role of Worry. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making 25, 534-543.
Schwartz, B., Ward, A., Monterosso, J., Lyubomirsky, S., White, K., Lehman, D. (2002): Maximizing Versus Satisficing: Happiness is a Matter of Choice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 83, 1178-1197.
Selten, R., Chmura, T., Pitz, T., Kube, S., Schreckenberg, M. (2007): Commuters route choice behavior. Games and Economic Behavior 58, 394-406.
Weber, M. and Zuchel, H. (2005), How Do Prior Outcomes Affect Risk Attitude? Comparing Escalation of Commitment and the House Money Effect. Decision Analysis 2, 30-43.
Weitzel, U., Urbig, D., Desai, S., Sanders, M., and Acs, Z. (2010): The good, the bad, and the talented. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 76, 64-81.
Zimmer, A., Gründl, H., Schade, C. D. and Glenzer, F. (2016): An incentive-compatible experiment on probabilistic insurance and implications for an insurer’s solvency level. Journal of Risk and Insurance. Published online first. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jori.12148/pdf

 

Exam:

to be announced

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at tba
Description:

Abstract and Learning Objectives:
Various robust deviations from rational decision making have been reported such as loss aversion, probability weighting, status quo bias, overconfidence etc. Understanding those deviations leads to a more realistic modelling of the behavior of different economic actors and to an increased prediction success. In this course, participants will understand those and other important deviations from rationality as well as their theoretical explanations/modelling, e.g., prospect theory and mental accounting. Most theories have been developed implementing psychological and economic experiments. Whereas psychological experiments are mostly asking the respondents for hypothetical choices, real decisions with actual monetary payoffs are implemented in economic experiments. Half of the course will be concerned with a profound introduction to the several deviations from rationality that have been reported with real decision makers and with the theoretical treatment of those deviations. The other half of the course will deal with different types of experiments and different experimental designs as well as the matching of research question and type of empirical method to be used.

Content:
Whereas the first two days take the form of an interactive lecture and are mostly devoted to laying the basic knowledge in experimental research and behavioral decision theory, the next two days are devoted to specific applications of behavioral decision theory to selected topics in tax compliance, behavioral finance, behavioral insurance, entrepreneurial decisions, venture financing decisions, and consumer behavior. Whereas not all areas of business research are captured in the example studies, the applications are diverse as well as broad enough to have participants from different fields benefit from this course.

Selected Literature:
Friedman, D., Sunder, S. (1994): Experimental methods: A primer for economists. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK) and New York (USA).
Gigerenzer, G., Todd, P. M. and the ABC Research Group (1999): Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart. Oxford University Press, Oxford (UK).
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.

Essential Reading Material:

Reading Material (lecture)
A study of this part of the literature as well as the literature referenced under “selected literature” is obligatory for all participants.

Camerer, C. F. and Lovallo, D. (1999): Overconfidence and excess entry: An experimental approach. American Economic Review 89, 306-318.
Campbell, D. T. and Stanley, J. C. (1963): Experimental and quasi-experimental designs for research. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston.
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.
Samuelson, W. and Zeckhauser, R. (1988): Status quo bias in decision making. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 1, 7-59.
Sandri, S., Schade, C. D., Mußhoff, O., and Odening, M. (2010): Holding on for too long? - An experimental study on inertia in entrepreneurs' and non-entrepreneurs' disinvestment choices. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 76, 30-44.
Schade, C. D. (2005): Dynamics, experimental economics and entrepreneurship. Journal of Technology Transfer 30, 409-431.
Schade, C. D., Schröder, A., and Krause, K. (2010): Coordination after Gains and Losses: Is Prospect Theory's Value Function Predictive for Games? Journal of Mathematical Psychology 54, 426-445.
Shefrin, H. M. and Statman, M. (1985): The disposition to sell winners too early and ride losers too long: theory and evidence. Journal of Finance 40, 777-792.
Thaler, R. H. (1985): Mental accounting and consumer choice. Marketing Science 4, 199-214.

Reading Material (seminar)
Whereas it is assumed that everyone is having a deeper look into all of the following articles, each of the participants should prepare two or three of these papers intensively and be prepared to present the respective paper, discuss it, and formulate future research opportunities based on that paper. The presenters of the respective papers are fixed during the first seminar session (day 1).

Camerer, C. F. and Lovallo, D. (1999): Overconfidence and excess entry: An experimental approach. American Economic Review 89, 306-318.
Chan, C. S. R., & Park, H. D. (2015): How images and color of business plans influence venture investment screening decisions. Journal of Business Venturing 30, 732-748.
Charness, G. Gneezy, U. (2010): Portfolio Choice and Risk attitudes: An Experiment. Economic Inquiry 48, 133-146.
Franke, N., Gruber, M., Harhoff, D., Henkel, J. (2006): What you are is what you like: similarity biases in venture capitalists' evaluations of start-up teams. Journal of Business Venturing 21, 802-826.
Hallsworth, M., List, J., Metcalfe, R., Vlaev, I. (2014) (NBER Working Paper No. 20007): The Behavioralist As Tax Collector: Using Natural Field Experiments to Enhance Tax Compliance.
Koellinger, P., Minniti, M., and Schade, C. (2007): “I think I can, I think I can”: Overconfidence and entrepreneurial behavior. Journal of Economic Psychology 28, 502-527.
Schade, C., Kunreuther, H. C., and Koellinger, P. (2012): Protecting Against Low-Probability Disasters: The Role of Worry. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making 25, 534-543.
Schwartz, B., Ward, A., Monterosso, J., Lyubomirsky, S., White, K., Lehman, D. (2002): Maximizing Versus Satisficing: Happiness is a Matter of Choice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 83, 1178-1197.
Selten, R., Chmura, T., Pitz, T., Kube, S., Schreckenberg, M. (2007): Commuters route choice behavior. Games and Economic Behavior 58, 394-406.
Weber, M. and Zuchel, H. (2005), How Do Prior Outcomes Affect Risk Attitude? Comparing Escalation of Commitment and the House Money Effect. Decision Analysis 2, 30-43.
Weitzel, U., Urbig, D., Desai, S., Sanders, M., and Acs, Z. (2010): The good, the bad, and the talented. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 76, 64-81.
Zimmer, A., Gründl, H., Schade, C. D. and Glenzer, F. (2016): An incentive-compatible experiment on probabilistic insurance and implications for an insurer’s solvency level. Journal of Risk and Insurance. Published online first. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jori.12148/pdf

Venue
Given the ongoing pandemic situation, this semester the course will take place online. More information about access to the course platform will be uploaded after October 15th.

Exam:
to be announced

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 12:30pm to 01:30pm at online
Description:

Ongoing research of graduate students in finance is presented and discussed.

More information can be found here: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/Professorships/bwl/finance/seminars/finance-brownbag-seminar-1

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstr. 1, Room 4.05
Description:

Discussion of research papers.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Description:

Current research topics in Finance and Accounting.

Location see: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/bwl/finance/seminars

No participation limit. No obtainment of credit points.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The Finance-Accounting Research Seminar is a joint initiative of Humboldt-Universität, ESMT, and the TRR 266 Accounting for Transparency, and provides a forum to discuss current research in the areas of finance and accounting. External guests are welcome. For the current seminar schedule click here.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 09:30am at online
Description:

The objective of the “Financial Accounting Research Group” (FARG) is to introduce select students to current research in financial accounting. Participants of the FARG will learn the necessary skills to understand conceptual underpinnings and common empirical design choices in this area of research.

The FARG is organized around the Finance-Accounting Research Seminar that provides a forum for invited guest speakers to present current research papers. Participants of the FARG are welcome to attend the accounting talks of this seminar and expected to join internal discussion meetings of our institute in preparation of these talks. There are usually three accounting talks and three preparatory discussion meetings per semester. For details on the schedules of current and past semesters, please see here: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/bwl/finance/seminars

Students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) participating in the FARG for at least two semesters and (ii) writing three reviews (or two
reviews and a discussion protocol) on papers that are presented by our guest speakers. Enrolment into the FARG is possible at the beginning of each semester. Details on the application procedure will be announced in early April (summer term) and early October (winter term) via the website of our institute.

The number of participants is limited to 20 students. Registration until 15 April 2021 via Email: u.bruggemann@hu-berlin.de

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The objective of the “Financial Accounting Research Group” (FARG) is to introduce select students to current research in financial accounting. Participants of the FARG will learn the necessary skills to understand conceptual underpinnings and common empirical design choices in this area of research.

The FARG is organized around the Finance-Accounting Research Seminar that provides a forum for invited guest speakers to present current research papers. Participants of the FARG are welcome to attend the accounting talks of this seminar and expected to join internal discussion meetings of our institute in preparation of these talks. There are usually three accounting talks and three preparatory discussion meetings per semester. For details on the schedules of current and past semesters, please see here: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/bwl/finance/seminars

Master students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) participating in the FARG for at least two semesters and (ii) writing three reviews (or two reviews and a discussion protocol) on papers that are presented by our guest speakers. Bachelor students cannot obtain ECTS through the FARG, but they are very welcome to join our talks and discussion meetings for inspiration. Students who participated in the FARG for at least two semesters will receive a certificate that confirms their participation.

Enrolment into the FARG is possible at the beginning of each semester. Details on the application procedure will be announced in early April (summer term) and early October (winter term) via the website of our institute.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 04:00pm to 05:30pm at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Karl-Popper-Room (2.3.020)
Description:

This course aims at enabling students to conduct research in promising areas in macroeconomics. One area aims to identify the effects of fiscal and monetary policy using micro datasets. Further "hot" areas are macro and inequality, the role of expectations in macro, and macrofinance.
In a first step, we read and discuss recent papers and some classics. The fruitful discussions and the intensive engagement with the topics should lead to the development of independent research ideas.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Graduate students in the field of econonometrics and applied labor markets present and discuss their ongoing research projects.
No obtainment of credit points.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 10:15am to 11:45am at online
Description:

The objective of the course is to give an overview over modern theories of economic growth. The formal presentation uses the continuous–time framework in order to equip the students with the formal tools required to analyze continuous–time economic dynamics. Besides looking at growth models, the lecture addresses also related topics like the distribution of wealth and income, exhaustible resources and stochastic growth models. The lecture is accompanied by a tutorial.

Contents:

  • Formal Prerequisites: Differential Equations and Theory of Optimal Control
  • The Neoclassical Growth Model
  • The Ramsey Model
  • First Generation Models of Endogenous Growth
  • Second Generation Model of Endogenous Growth
  • Stochastic Growth

Literature:

The following two books cover most of the topics addressed in the lecture:

Acemuglu, D., (2009), Introduction to Modern Economic Growth (Princeton University Press).
Barro, R. & Sala-i Martin, X., (2004), Economic Growth (MIT–Press), 3rd edn.

Further references and recommendations for further reading will be given during the course.

Exam:

Written exam/Problem sets

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 05:00pm to 07:00pm at online
Description:

The Macro Reading Group presents the opportunity to young economists in the Berlin area to meet on a regular basis to discuss a previously chosen topic, paper or book chapter in order to facilitate the exchange of ideas between students who are starting their own research.

The reading group is similar to a research seminar, where usually at the beginning of each session someone (the ‘expert’) briefly presents the topic at hand and also has prepared some questions to discuss. However, in contrast to a research seminar, the reading group should foster open discussions in a more casual way. Moreover, the topics are macro related (theoretical or empirical) and are also chosen by the participants in advance, and are approved by the BDPEMS-Faculty member responsible for the reading group. The topics vary and range from the newest most popular paper to some textbook chapter, or even some “classics” depending on the group’s current interest.

This reading group is held in English. BSE’ and BDPEMS' participants of the Macro Reading Group can obtain three credits (ECTS) for their regular participation.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 05:00pm to 07:00pm at Online
Description:

The Macro Reading Group presents an opportunity for young economists in the Berlin area to meet on a regular basis to discuss a previously chosen topic, paper or book chapter in order to facilitate the exchange of ideas between students who are starting their own research.
The reading group is similar to a research seminar, where all the participants prepare for the topic at hand by reading the relevant literature and preparing some questions to discuss. However, in contrast to a research seminar, the reading group should foster open discussions in a more casual way. The topics are chosen by the participants in advance, and are approved by the BSE-Faculty member responsible for the reading group. This semester, all the topics are related to the Heterogeneous Agent literature.
This reading group is held in English. BSE participants of the Macro Reading Group can obtain three credits (ECTS) for their regular participation.

To get more information on how to access the reading group's online meetings, please contact Konrad Kuhmann.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 06:00pm to 08:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Schumpeter Lounge
Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 08:30am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

Time frame (date of first and last class):

  • Lectures by Alexander Kriwoluzky: every Wednesday from April 14 to May 26
  • Lectures by Frank Heinemann: every Wednesday from June 2 to July 14

Time(s):

  • Lectures by A. Kriwoluzky: 8:30 – 12:00 (with a break at 10:00)
  • Lectures by F. Heinemann: 8:30 – 12:00 (with a break at 10:00)

Description of the course:

  • Lectures by A. Kriwoluzky: This part of the course teaches methods to analyze the effects of monetary and fiscal policy. Methods cover narrative and high-frequency identification of policy interventions, local projections, Vector-Autoregression models, and DSGE models.
  • Lectures by F. Heinemann: This part of the course covers topics such as growth, determinacy of the price level, bubbles, equilibrium multiplicity, strategic uncertainty, and current limits of DSGE models. More information will be provided at https://www.macroeconomics.tu-berlin.de/menue/teaching_lehre/adv_macroeconomic_analysis_ii/

Literature:

will be announced during the lectures.

Exam:

midterm and final exam.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 09:00am to 12:00pm at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1 or Zoom
Description:

Part 1: Networks and organizations I: Core concepts and methods to understand networks in organizations
Instructor: Eric Quintane

The first part of the course introduces social network analysis within organizations. We will start by discussing key ideas and debates in social network analysis, such as the notion of embeddedness, network structure and the role of individual agency. We will then take a deeper dive into the methodological implications of doing research with social network data. We will cover 1) measures used to identify network positions and key network characteristics, 2) more advanced statistical models developed to handle the problem of dependence of observations and 3) concepts and measures regarding network dynamics. This first part will equip you with the knowledge that you need to embark in more advanced topics in network analysis.

Part 2: Networks and organizations II: Further topics in network analysis, including semantic networks,
strategic network formation, and Bonacich centrality
Instructor: Matt Bothner

The second part of the course explores empirical applications of network-analytic methods to a wide array of agents—professional auto racers, gangsters, college fraternity members, and words in semantic networks. In addition to our empirical emphasis, we’ll consider a game-theoretic network formation model designed to better understand the performance-related consequences of peer monitoring within the firm.

Part 3: Organizational learning, behavioral strategy, and luck
Instructor: Chengwei Liu

The third part of the course focuses on organizational learning and its implications for strategy. We will cover canonical ideas/models, such as the exploration and exploitations trade-off, the traps when organizations learn from successes and failures, how randomness complicates learning, and how learning reinforces or changes organizational routines. A framework of strategy as arbitrage will be introduced to connect several ideas covered in this course.

Please see schedule and syllabus attached.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 09:00am to 12:00pm at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Description:

This course will be offered online using Zoom. The link to join the Zoom sessions will be sent by email to all students who registered for this course.

Part 1:

Instructor: Eric Quintane
Topic: Networks and organizations I: Introduction to core concepts and methods used to understand networks in organizations

Part 2:

Instructor: Stefan Wagner
Topic: Innovation, intellectual property rights and the market for technology

Part 3:

Instructor: Matthew Bothner (guest instructor: Chengwei Liu)
Topic: Networks and organizations II: Further topics in network analysis, including semantic networks, strategic network formation, and Bonacich centrality

 

Please see attached schedule and syllabus for the course.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=103739

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 112
Description:

The course will be held online using Zoom. More information on how to attend the online course are available on Moodle.

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 12:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Thursday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Description:

The intention of the course is to familiarize students with the standard tools of modern economic theory and to train them in applying these tools to actual economic problems. It is particularly devoted to market failures and welfare economics. The first part (Part III in MWG) outlines properties of competetive markets and welfare analysis in a partial equilibrium context. It then focuses on the three classical conditions under which market outcomes lead to an inefficient allocation of resources: externalities, imperfect competition and asymmetric information. The second part (Part V in MWG) addresses fundamental issues of welfare economics from the perspective of a policy maker who designs and implements collective decisions. It focuses in particular on social choice theory, the foundations of bargaining and welfare economics, and mechanism design. The course addresses these issue both from a positive and normative perspective.

Course times:

Mondays 12:00 - 4.00 pm: lectures
Thursdays 12:00-2:00 pm: exercises (held by Amir Habibi)

Literature:

Mas-Colell, Whinston, and Green (1995), Microeconomic Theory (MWG), Part III and Part V

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=103735

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 10:00am to 01:00pm at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58, Elinore Ostrom Hall
Description:

The course will be held via Webex. Information on how to attend the online course will be provided to registered students by M. Fratzscher's office.

The seminar deals with changes and new developments in the theoretical and empirical literature on monetary policy. Topics covered through lectures and seminar papers include the following: the appropriate mandates and objective function of central banks, the relationship between monetary policy and financial supervision, the role of the exchange rates, the functioning of monetary policy in a monetary union, the importance of fiscal dominance, quantitative easing during financial crises, the role of communication of objectives and policies, the functioning of central bank committees, transparency and independence and accountability, global coordination of monetary policy, the international role of the euro and the US dollar.

The course will first start with a series of lectures addressing these various issues. The seminar participants are then asked to prepare a seminar paper on one of the issues, which then has to be presented and discussed towards the end of the semester. To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

The lectures will take place on 28 April and 5 May. The seminar presentations will take place on 7, 14 and 16 July.

Part of the seminar:
Ungraded presentation and discussion

Restriction to participation: 20

Registration: 30.03. to 03.04.2020 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de

Literature:

1. Monetary policy by the ECB
There is a large controversy about the effectiveness of the ECB’s unconventional monetary policies. Is monetary policy doing too much; is the ECB going beyond its mandate? What should it do going forward? And how effective have its nonstandard monetary policy been in the past?

Altavilla, C., Giannone, D., Lenza, M., 2014. The financial and macroeconomic effects of the OMT announcements. ECB Working Paper forthcoming.
Fratzscher, M., Lo Duca, M., Straub, R., 2014, “ECB Unconventional Monetary Policy Actions: Market Impact, International Spillovers and Transmission Channels”, IMF AR conference paper.
Rogers, J. H., Scotti, C. and Wright, J. H., 2014. Evaluating asset-market effects of unconventional monetary policy: a cross country comparison. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, International Finance Discussion Papers No. 1101, March 2014.
Praet, P (2013), "Forward Guidance and the ECB", VoxEU.org, August 6.

2. Unconventional monetary policy by the Federal Reserve
The Federal Reserve has been one of the first central banks that adopted a policy of quantitative easing following the global financial crisis in 2008. The Fed combined these policies with other policy measures. Moreover, quantitative easing policies differ sharply across countries and central banks, given different objectives and different market structures. What are the channels through which nonstandard monetary policy functions? What is the evidence which of these channels were most important? What are the costs and benefits from such policies?

Bauer M.D., Rudebush, G., 2013. The Signalling Channel of Federal Reserve Bond Purchases. International Journal of Central Banking, forthcoming.
Gagnon, J., Raskin, M., Remache, J., Sack, B., 2011. “The Financial Market Effect of Federal Reserve’s Large-Scale Asset Purchases”. International Journal of Central Banking, 7 (1), 3–43.
Krishnamurthy A., Vissing-Jorgensen, A., 2011. The effects of quantitative easing on interest rates: channels and implications for policy. Brookings Papers on Economic Activity 2, 215-287.

3. Spillovers and interdependence of monetary policy
There is a big discussion in international fora whether and how large spillovers of US and European quantitive easing policies have been over the past few years to other countries, in particular emerging markets what is the evidence for such spillovers? What are the costs and benefits? Do emerging markets benefits from such policies or do they suffer?

Bowman, D., Londono, J. M., Sapriza, H., 2014. US unconventional monetary policy and contagion to emerging market economies. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Mimeo.
Chen,Q., Fliardo, A., He, D., and Zhu F., 2012. International spillovers of central bank balance sheet policies. BIS Working Paper 66, 2012.
Fratzscher, M., Lo Duca, M., Straub, R., 2013, “On the international spill-overs of US quantitative easing”. ECB Working Paper No. 1557.
Lim, J., J.,Mohapatra, S., Stocker, M., 2014. Tinker, Taper, QE, Bye? The Effect of Quantitative Easing on Financial Flows to Developing Countries. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 6820.

4. The inflation targeting debate – has inflation targeting been successful?
Central banks have shifted massively towards inflation targeting since the early 1990s. But this trend has been stopped and partly been reverse during the crisis as many central banks have abandoned informally heir inflation objective and focused on other objectives (financial stability, growth, employment, exchange rate stability). What are the pros nd cons of IT? Is it still the preferred monetary policy regime after the crises? What are the criteria to answer this question, and what is the outlook for the future?

Fatas, A., Mihov, I. and A. Rose (2006). Quantitative Goals for Monetary Policy, Journal of Money, Credit and Banking.
Levin, A.T., F.M. Natalucci and J.M. Piger (2004). The Macroeconomic Effects of Inflation Targeting. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review. 86(4), 51-80.
Gürkaynak, R., A. Levin, und E. Swanson (2006). Does Inflation Targeting Anchor Long-Run Inflation Expectations? Evidence from Long-Term Bond Yields in the US, UK and Sweden. Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Working Paper No. 2006-09.
Lin, S. and Ye, H. (2007). Does inflation targeting really make a difference? Evaluating the treatment effect of inflation targeting in seven industrial countries, Journal of Monetary Economics

5. Global reserve accumulation
Many emerging markets (EMs) have been accumulating massive amounts of foreign reserve holdings. What are the motivations for this trend? What are its domestic and global repercussions; what are possible alternatives? How does foreign-exchange accumulation fit into different monetary policy strategies? What is the relationship between foreign-exchange policy, capital account openness and monetary policy?

Aizenman, J., and H. Ito. 2013. Living with the Trilemma Constraint: Relative Trilemma Policy Divergence, Crises, and Output Losses for Developing Countries. NBER Working Paper No. 19448 (September). Cambridge: National Bureau of Economic Research.
Aizenman, J., M. D. Chinn, and H. Ito. 2008. “Assessing the Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Measuring the Trilemma's Configurations Over Time.” NBER Working Paper #14533. Cambridge: National Bureau of Economic Research.
Aizenman, J., M. D. Chinn, and H. Ito. 2010. "The Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Tracing and Evaluating the New Patterns of the Trilemma's Configurations", Journal of International Money and Finance, Vol. 29, No.4, p. 615-641 (2010).
Cheung, Y.-W. and H. Ito. 2009. “Cross-sectional analysis on the determinants of international reserves accumulation.” International Economic Journal, Vol. 23, No. 4, p. 447-481.

6. Global saving glut, global imbalances and monetary policy
What are the chances, and what the potential channels for an adjustment of global current account positions and capital flows? What are the risks from such imbalances; and how important have they been in explaining the global financial crisis? How does the global saving glut relate to monetary policy, is it a cause or consequence or entirely unrelated?

Chinn, Menzie and E. Prasad (2003), “Medium-Term Determinants of Current Accounts in Industrial and Developing Countries: An Empirical Exploration,” Journal of International Economics 59, 47–76.
Lane, Philip R. and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti (2011), “External Adjustment and the Global Crisis,” IMF Working Paper WP/11/197, August.
Bernanke, Ben S. (2005), “The Global Saving Glut and the U.S. Current Account Deficit.” The Sandburg Lecture, Virginia Association of Economists, Richmond, VA, March 10.
Chinn, M., B. Eichengreen and H. Ito (2013): "A forensic analysis of global imbalances", Working Paper, University of Wisconsin.

Exam: Term paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

Panel data are omnipresent in economics. They come with many advantages: the resulting larger data sets enable more precise inference, observing individuals/rms/countries at multiple points in time allows to model and estimate dynamic responses to changes in variables of interest over time, and they can overcome some endogeneity concerns and hence contribute to a convincing identication strategy.

Naturally, adding time as a second dimension to the data does not come without challenges. The aim of the course is to both make the advantages of panel data clear and equip students with the tools and technical understanding to make use of their potential. Starting from the linear one- and two-way error component models, we will venture into different advanced challenges in panel econometrics, including dynamic, unbalanced, and non-linear panel models. In accompanying computer sessions, we will implement and use some of the estimators ourselves in the statistical software R.

The main accompanying textbook is "Econometric Analysis of Panel Data" (5th edition) by Badi Baltagi. Additional references will be provided in the lecture.

The course will be held online via Zoom on Thursdays from 10 to 12. The Zoom link will be shared with all participants before the first lecture, which will take place on April 15th, 2021.

Exam:

The course will be assessed based on a 90 minute exam which will contain both a theory and a computer part. There will be the additional opportunity to gain bonus points for the exam by completing optional computer exercises during the term. For PhD students, there will be an additional take-home exam component assessing the parts of the course that are additionally offered for the PhD level.

Please register by writing an email to joschka.wanner@uni-potsdam.de before April 12th, 2021.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 10:00am at online
Description:

Causal inference has become the predominant toolbox in empirical research. The aim of this course is to provide participants with a deeper understanding of microeconometric methods that allow to draw causal inference in many settings and discuss the most-recent advances. The course will have a block-structure where we first discuss causality based on the potential outcome framework. After a brief discussion of experimental methods, we will introduce different popular quasi-experimental methods such as matching, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables or regression discontinuity. We will discuss the identifying assumptions and the pros and cons of each method based on empirical examples. The lecture will also be complemented by practical computer sessions where the estimators will be implemented in STATA or R.

Topics:

  • Causality and the Potential Outcome Framework
  • Experiments
  • Matching
  • Difference-in-Differences
  • Instrumental Variables
  • Regression-Discontinuity Design

The course will be held in block structure between April 12 and June 22, 2021, with approximately seven lecture days (4 hours each) during the semester. The practical sessions – about six – will be blocked as well.

Updated course information will be available by March 22 under https://www.uni-potsdam.de/de/empwifo/studium-lehre/aktuelles-semester.html.

PhD students are asked to register by April 9 via huber@empwifo.uni-potsdam.de.

Literature:

paper-based. For an introduction, see Imbens G, Wooldridge J. (2009): Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation. Journal of Economic Literature, 2009;47(1):5-86.

Exam:

written exam (90 min) and term paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 10:00am to Friday, 03:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

The Preparatory Math Course aims to equip students with the necessary math background for the first year (compulsory) economics graduate level courses. It is mainly meant to be a refresher of existing math knowledge.

More information (syllabus, schedule, course documents, access to the online course) can be found here.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 04:30pm at University of Potsdam, Campus Griebnitzsee
Description:

COVID-19 update:
As classroom meetings are currently not possible, the first session of the course will be held via Zoom on Monday, April 20 at 10:15. During this session, we will discuss how to proceed given the current situation. Please sign up for the course via E-Mail to Stefan (
tuebbicke@empwifo.uni-potsdam.de). This will be necessary as to share the link to our Zoom meeting as well as the password for the Moodle course with you.

Causal inference has become the predominant toolbox in empirical research. The aim of this course is to provide participants with a deeper understanding of microeconometric methods that allow to draw causal inference in many settings and discuss the most-recent advances. The course will have a block-structure where we first discuss causality based on the potential outcome framework. After a brief discussion of experimental methods, we will introduce different popular quasi-experimental methods such as matching, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables or regression discontinuity. We will discuss the identifying assumptions and the pros and cons of each method based on empirical examples. The lecture will also be complemented by practical computer sessions where the estimators will be implemented in STATA or R.

Topics:

  • Causality and the Potential Outcome Framework
  • Experiments
  • Matching
  • Difference-in-Differences
  • Instrumental Variables
  • Regression-Discontinuity Design

The course will be held in block structure between April 20 and July 10, 2020, with approximately seven lecture days (4 hours each) during the semester. The practical sessions – about six – will be blocked as well.

Updated course information will be available by March 23 under https://www.uni-potsdam.de/de/empwifo/studium-lehre/aktuelles-semester.html.

PhD students are asked to register by April 13 via tuebbicke@empwifo.uni-potsdam.de.

Literature:
paper-based. For an introduction, see Imbens G, Wooldridge J. (2009): Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation. Journal of Economic Literature, 2009;47(1):5-86.

Exam:
written exam (90 min) and term paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 04:15pm to 05:30pm at online
Wednesday, 08:30am to 09:45am at online
Description:

Corporations are the backbone of our economies. They employ us and provide us with goods and services. We invest our savings into them. They impact our ecological environment as well as our societies at large. Economic frictions make it necessary to monitor and regulate them. This requires some level of corporate transparency. In this course, transparency means the quality of information as generated, distributed, received, and processed by economic agents. Regulators, the media, and public interest activists have regularly criticized low levels of corporate transparency, while corporations have stressed the direct and indirect costs of corporate transparency as well as the risks of information overload. This has motivated the Collaborative Research Center TRR 266 “Accounting for Transparency” to develop a research program concentrated on corporate transparency.

This course is open for everybody who is interested in research on corporate transparency. It has been designed for Master and first year PhD students to get familiar with current research in this field and to take their first steps towards doing independent research on this topic. A set of leading academics from Europe and the U.S. will act as guest speakers and share their views on the field. After completing the course, students will understand its main findings and have reviewed them critically. Also, they will be able to develop research projects that add to this fascinating and relevant field. The course should be particularly useful for students in the area of business, economics and related social sciences that are interested in working this area. As an open online course, students and fellow academics from all institutions are encouraged to participate in the course.

Literature:

Will be announced during the course

Exam:

Class participation, Individual empirical assignments and a group project (see syllabus for details)

More information can be found in the syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 03:30pm at FU Berlin, Boltzmannstr. 20, Kaminzimmer (room 202)
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on FU's Blackboard. Please email to economics@jfki.fu-berlin.de to get access.

This seminar is geared toward PhD students who are at the beginning of their second or third year and who specialize in the field of applied microeconomics, in particular, in empirical work striving to identify causal effects (e. g, by applying quasi-experimental methods). The seminar aims to help students kick starting their first research project respectively first research paper. This course offers students a forum to present and discuss their first own research project. Presentation of early stage research projects or research ideas is encouraged. Active participation in all weekly meetings is mandatory. Extensive feedback will be provided on the research project, including recommendations on how to proceed with their research agenda towards their dissertation. The seminar will be also devoted to questions concerning the writing of papers (e.g., abstract and introduction).

Registration

To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract (< 450 words) of your (planned) research project/paper to economics@jfki.fu-berlin.de.

Registration should take place not later than April 10, 2020!

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

This seminar is geared toward students who are at the beginning of their second or third year. The seminar aims to help students kick-starting and receive active feedback on their research projects in micro economic theory. Students who wish to obtain ECTS credits are required to present at least once, attend at least 75% of the sessions, and actively participate in the discussions. Presentation of early stage research projects or research ideas is highly encouraged. The seminar offers students a forum to present and discuss their own research project. Extensive feedback will be provided.

Literature:
none

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=103737

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21a
Description:

The colloquium will be held online on Wednesdays between 4.30 and 6.00 pm using Zoom. The first session will take place on April 22 and will serve as a check-in to see who is interested, if there are technical difficulties and to clarify questions. A Moodle course was created where the upcoming sessions together with the Zoom link to the meeting will be announced.

This seminar is geared toward students who are at the beginning of their second or third year. The seminar aims to help students kick-starting and receive active feedback on their research projects in micro economic theory. Students who wish to obtain ECTS credits are required to present at least once, attend at least 75% of the sessions, and actively participate in the discussions. Presentation of early stage research projects or research ideas is highly encouraged. The seminar offers students a forum to present and discuss their own research project. Extensive feedback will be provided.

Literature:
none

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

Discussion of current research papers in financial economics and related fields.

Prerequisites: "Advanced Financial Economics" (PhD level) or equivalent knowledge. Registration in the first session.

Literature:
Academic papers

Exam:
Term paper (30,000 characters)

More information can be found on Moodle: tba

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 4.05
Description:

Discussion of current research topics in financial economics.

Evaluation:
Seminar paper (100 %)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Description:

Research Seminar. No obtainment of credit points

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor-Ostrom-Hall
Description:

No obtainment of credit points.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Wednesday, 08:30am to 10:00am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 203
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

The lecture deals with theoretical and practical concepts from the fields of statistical learning and machine learning. The main focus is on predictive modeling. The weekly tutorial applies these concepts and methods to real examples for illustration purposes. You are expected to work throughthe exercises for the tutorials. They will typically consist of proofs of theory and programming tasks like the implementation of algorithms.

The registration to the moodle course is obligatory.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Description:

The lecture deals with theoretical and practical concepts from the fields of statistical learning and machine learning. The main focus is on predictive modeling. The weekly tutorial applies these concepts and methods to real examples for illustration purposes. You are expected to work throughthe exercises for the tutorials. They will typically consist of proofs of theory and programming tasks like the implementation of algorithms.

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=90845#section-2

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 05:00pm at online
Description:

Course objectives

  • Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important.
  • Provide insights into strategy (especially, identification) in important papers in structural Labour, Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.
  • Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation.
  • Develop matrix programming skills using Matlab. Loops vs. vectorisation; readability vs. speed; sustainable coding for several projects.

More information about covered topics and references can be found in the attached syllabus.

Exam/ evaluation

If this course is taken for credits, the nal grade will be determined by

  • 2 problem sets (to be completed in groups of max. 2 participants), weighted 1/3 each, and
  • a final exam, weighted 1/3.
Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 05:00pm at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58
Description:

Course objectives:

  • Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important.
  • Provide insights into strategy (especially, identication) in important papers in structural Labour, Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.
  • Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation.
  • Develop matrix programming skills using Matlab. Loops vs. vectorisation; readability vs. speed; sustainable coding for several projects.

Evaluation:
If this course is taken for credits, the final grade will be determined by

  • 2 problem sets (to be completed in groups of max. 2 participants), weighted 1/3 each, and
  • a final exam, weighted 1/3.

Course location:
DIW Berlin, rooms as follows:
16.4. Friedensburg, 23.4. Friedensburg, 30.4. Popper, 14.5. Friedensburg, 28.5. 33002C, 11.6. Friedensburg, 12.6. Friedensburg, 18.6. Friedensburg, 25.6. 33002C, 2.7. Friedensburg, 9.7. tbd

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday, 09:00am to 12:30pm at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall, 1.2.019, (possibly partly in Schwartz Room)
Description:
  1. Vector Autoregressive Models
  2. Vector Error Correction Models
  3. Structural VAR Tools
  4. Bayesian VAR Analysis
  5. Identification by Short-Run Restrictions
  6. Identfication by Long-Run Restrictions
  7. Inference for Impulse Responses
  8. Sign Restrictions
  9. Identfication by Heteroskedasticity or Non-Gaussianity
  10. Identification Based on External Instruments
  11. Structural VAR Analysis in a Data-Rich Environment
  12. Nonfundamental Shocks

Literature:

Lutz Kilian and Helmut Lutkepohl (2017), Structural Vector Autoregressive Analysis, Cambridge University Press.
Helmut Lutkepohl (2005), New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer-Verlag.

Block course during the period 19 - 30 October 2020! Please register via email to Juliane Metzner (JMetzner@diw.de)!

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday, 09:00am to 12:30pm at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall
Description:

The course will be postponed to the fall term 2020.

  1. Vector Autoregressive Models
  2. Vector Error Correction Models
  3. Structural VAR Tools
  4. Bayesian VAR Analysis
  5. Identification by Short-Run Restrictions
  6. Identification by Long-Run Restrictions
  7. Inference for Impulse Responses
  8. Sign Restrictions
  9. Identification by Heteroskedasticity or Non-Gaussianity
  10. Identification Based on External Instruments
  11. Structural VAR Analysis in a Data-Rich Environment
  12. Nonfundamental Shocks

Literature:

Lutz Kilian and Helmut Lütkepohl (2017), Structural Vector Autoregressive Analysis, Cambridge University Press.
Helmut Lütkepohl (2005), New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer-Verlag.

Time:

16×90 min lectures during the period 11-22 May 2020.

Location:

Elinor Ostrom Hall, 1.2.019, DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin.

Exam:

The grade for the course will be based on a paper which is due shortly after the end of the course. Details will be announced in class.

Please register via email to Juliane Metzner.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on the course's website.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21a
Monday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle. General guidelines for digital courses given by Michael Burda can be found in the linked PDF file.

Search and matching frictions as a fundamental and defining attribute of labor markets. Role of matching frictions in models of employment, unemployment, and other phenomena. Introduction to search theory in partial equilibrium settings. On-the-job search and wage distributions in general equilibrium. Models of wage-posting. Jovanovic's model. Implications for labor market institutions and macroeconomic analysis.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

The main objective of the seminar is to support each participant in developing a research project that is suitable for a thesis in accounting and auditing.

Seminar participants have to complete three assignments in order to show their learning progress.

  • The first assignment is to replicate and extend parts of an already published empirical paper. The goal is to provide the participants with the necessary skills to conduct each step of an empirical analysis (i.e., data preparation, data description and data analysis) on their own. Students will work on the first assignment during the first half of the seminar for about six weeks.
  • The second assignment is to prepare a research proposal. The idea is that the participants use their insights from the first assignment and the seminar meetings to develop a proposal as a potential foundation for their Master's thesis. Students will work on the second assignment during the second half of the seminar for about six weeks.
  • The third assignment is to present the research proposal during the last seminar meeting to all other participants as well as selected members of our institute. Students are also expected to discuss the proposals of the other participants.

The final grade will be given/will be awarded for the portfolio of all three assignments.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Thursday, 08:00am to 10:00am at online
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing time series data. The focus is on univariate modelling tools. The lecture begins with classical components models. Then we cover different types of stochastic processes like ARIMA and GARCH models, deal with the unit root methodology and procedures for forecasting as well as for the specification, estimation and validation of models. Multivariate extensions are demonstrated, with emphasis on vector autoregressive (VAR) processes and its application in causality and impulse response analyses. Nonstationary systems with integrated and cointegrated variables will also be treated. In the last session, a brief introduction to count time series, with particular emphasis in INAR(1) models and
their applications, will be introduced.

In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data. We will intensively make use of econometric software packages.

Classical components models; stochastic processes; stationarity; ARIMA processes, GARCH models; specification, estimation and validation of models; forecasting; unit root tests; multivariate extensions: VAR processes, causality and impulse response analysis, cointegrated processes. In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data.

Literature:

Hamilton, D.J. (1994). Time Series Analysis, Princeton University Press.
Lütkepohl, H. (2005). New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer Verlag, Heidelberg

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=102841

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21a
Thursday, 08:00am to 10:00am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 25
Description:

Information on how to attend the online course will be available on Moodle.

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing time series data. The focus is on univariate modelling tools. The lecture begins with classical components models. Then we cover different types of stochastic processes like ARIMA and GARCH models, deal with the unit root methodology and procedures for forecasting as well as for the specification, estimation and validation of models. Multivariate extensions are demonstrated, with emphasis on vector autoregressive (VAR) processes and its application in causality and impulse response analyses. Nonstationary systems with integrated and cointegrated variables will also be treated. In the last session, a brief introduction to count time series, with particular emphasis in INAR(1) models and their applications, will be introduced.

In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data. We will intensively make use of econometric software packages.

Classical components models; stochastic processes; stationarity; ARIMA processes, GARCH models; specification, estimation and validation of models; forecasting; unit root tests; multivariate extensions: VAR processes, causality and impulse response analysis, cointegrated processes. In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data.

Literature:
Hamilton, D.J. (1994). Time Series Analysis, Princeton University Press.
Lütkepohl, H. (2005). New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer Verlag, Heidelberg

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 09:00am at Haus Tornow am See, Oberbarnim
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical finance and macroeconomics. The course provides doctoral students the opportunity to present their own, preliminary research in these areas.

Time and Location:
18th - 19th August 2021
Haus Tornow am See, Oberbarnim

Registration:
To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract to max.diegel@fu-berlin.de
Registration should take place not later than 21 June, 2021.

Requirements:
The seminar paper will be due few weeks before the date of the seminar. Papers are encouraged to be preliminary.

Credits:
2.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 09:00am to 05:00pm at Haus Tornow am See, Oberbarnim
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical finance and macroeconomics. The course provides doctoral students the opportunity to present their own, preliminary research in these areas.

To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract to max.diegel@fu-berlin.de. Registration should take place not later than 31 May, 2020.

Exam: none

Credits:
2.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
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