Courses

Please check with the BSE Handbook which mandatory courses you have to choose in your PhD track. Not all courses listed here can be approved as Core Courses for all BSE PhD tracks.

Instructor:
Description:

The objective of this course is that students are able to (i) understand and critically evaluate seminal research in accounting and (ii) use these skills to develop an exposé for a research project that has the potential to contribute to extant literature.

The course entails group discussions of seminal papers that identify fundamental questions in accounting research and that use innovative methods to address such questions.

Students can obtain credits by (i) actively participating during the reading group sessions and (ii) writing and presenting an exposé for a research project.

Time & venue:
Fridays, 14:00-16:00

Exam:
Writing and presenting an exposé

Enrolment & registration:
Enrolment into the Accounting Reading Group is possible at the beginning of each semester. Maximum number of participants: 20
Please register via email to Ulf Brüggemann (u.bruggemann@hu-berlin.de) until October 18, 2021.
 

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The course introduces econometric methods for analyzing cross-sectional data, panel data and time series data and discusses their applicability in practice. The following topics are covered: extensions and applications of the linear model; instrumental variable estimation; binary response models; truncated and censored regression, static panel data models; specification, estimation, validation and forecasting of autoregressive models. The application of these methods is explained and illustrated by means of empirical examples.

Literature:
Main: Békés, Gábor and Gábor Kézdi: "Data Analysis for Business Economics and Policy", Cambridge Univ. Press, 2021, https://gabors-data-analysis.com/
Additional: Verbeek, Marno: "A Guide to Modern Econometrics", John Wiley & Sons, 2012.

Time & venue:
Lectures: Mondays, 12:00-15:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)
Tutorials: Mondays, 15:00-16:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)

Exam:
Written exam

More information about access to the course platform can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Learning objectives:
Students gain knowledge of recent advances in migration economics, particularly applied empirical analyses in the intersection of migration, economic development, political economy and labor economics with a focus on the effects of migration on economic development of source and destination countries. They are able to critically evaluate research on these topics and assess strengths and weaknesses of causal claims in economics papers. Students have familiarized themselves with data analysis and have reproduced some of the results of a few seminal papers in migration economics. Students are equipped to present papers in an academic setting. The students are able to identify gaps in the literature and develop research proposals that are empirically sound and add to the body of work in migration economics in a meaningful way.

Lecture:
What is the effect of migration on economic development? In this course, we will look at the effects of international and regional migration on the diffusion of knowledge, the integration of countries into global markets through trade and FDI, as well as other diaspora externalities relevant to economic development. Synthesizing the conclusions of a number of seminal studies in the field and analyzing their empirical strategies, we will identify and critically evaluate various channels through which migration can alter the economic development of sending and receiving countries.

Tutorial:
Topics to be covered include: Instrumental variable methods, differences-in-differences, regression discontinuity design and other empirical strategies. There will be deep-dives into various papers, where students prepare referee reports and replicate findings of empirical papers on migration and cultural economics.

Literature:
Reading list will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Time & venue:
Tuesdays, 16:00-20:00

Exam:
Portfolio exam (referee reports, presentations, term paper) or written exam. This will be decided depending on the size of the class.

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The Berlin Applied Micro Seminar (BAMS) is a weekly seminar, jointly organized by DIW Berlin, Hertie School, HU Berlin, FU Berlin, TU Berlin, WZB, the Berlin Centre for Consumer Policies (BCCP), and the CRC TRR 190. In this seminar, researchers present their current work in the field of applied microeconomic theory.

Time & venue:
Mondays, 16:00-17:15

See the web page for topics, locations and further information.

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Instructor:
Description:

Advanced students present research designs and preliminary results.

Time & venue:
Wednesdays, 10:00-12:00

More information can be found on Moodle.

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Instructor:
Description:

The Berlin Behavioral Economics Colloquium and Seminar are a joint effort between DIW, WZB, HU Berlin and TU Berlin (in cooperation with CRC TRR 190) with the aim of fostering the exchange between active researchers in the areas of behavioral and experimental economics.

Time & venue:
Thursdays, 15:00-18:00

More information: https://bbe-berlin.de/events/

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This is the Berlin-wide micro theory seminar where outward guest presents their current research. The seminar's program is available here.

Time & venue:
Mondays, 10:00-12:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Ongoing research of graduate students in the field of labor market and macro economy will be presented and discussed.

Time & venue:
Wednesdays, 12:30-14:00

More information can be found here.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course is the substitute for the Core Course "Theory and Practice of Machine Learning" that cannot be offered this semester.

The module is concerned with theories, concepts, and practices to inform and support managerial decision making by means of formal, data oriented methods. Students have the opportunity to develop a variety of
skills, including:

  • Students are familiar with the three branches of descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics and appreciate the relationships between these streams.
  • Given some data, students are able to select appropriate techniques to summarize and visualize the data so as to maximize managerial insight.
  • Students understand the potential and also the limitations of predictive analytics to aid decision making. They comprehend when and how business applications can benefit from predictive analytics. Given some decision task, they are able to recommend suitable prediction methods.
  • Students are familiar with statistical programming languages. Using standard tools, they can develop basic and advanced prediction models and assess their accuracy in a statistically sound manner.

Topics & Content:
Fundamentals of Business Analytics
Making data accessible: Tools for summarization, grouping, and visualization
The business case for predictive modeling
Prediction methods for regression and classification
Advanced data types: time series, text, survival, and network data Fundamentals of intelligent search
Further elaboration of lecturing material
Practical PC exercises

The lecture is accompanied by a tutorial session, in which lecture topics are further elaborated. The aim of the tutorial is to develop and assess empirical models using contemporary data science software. More specifically, the R programming language is used in tutorial session. Students who are not familiar with R are given an opportunity to learn R/programming fundamentals in the first weeks of the tutorial sessions. In order to acquire the skills needed for the course in such short time frame, students must be prepared to invest ample time into self-study exercises.

Time & venue:
Lectures: Wednesdays, 10:00-12:00
Tutorials: Wednesdays 12:00-14:00, or Thursdays 08:30-10:00

Exam:
Written exam

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The main goal of this course is to provide the students with a systematic treatment of the fundamental questions, approaches and models in imperfectly competitive markets and their applications to real world competition policy. The students will become concerned with the causes and consequences of market power, strategic behaviour of firms in markets with market power, the overall performance of markets. Some of the main topics of the course are collusion, mergers, price discrimination and vertical restraints. Each topic will be dealt with its relevance for practical competition policy; as e.g., cartel policy, merger control, and the control of abusive practices.

Literature:
tba

Time & venue:
Lectures: Fridays, 12:00-14:00, online (starting on xx.xx.2021)
Tutorials: Fridays, 10:00-12:00, online (starting on xx.xx.2021)

Exam:
tba

More information can be found on ISIS.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The evolution from analogue to digital technologies continues to dominate the attention of decision makers today. Many tools in industrial production processes have been automated or replaced by highly complex mechanisms with pre-programmed decisionmaking. The change to digital modes of operations increasingly determines the lives of individuals and does so in increasingly unexpected ways. The students get insight into the area of modern internet based Computational Statistics Methods. Practically relevant knowledge on methods, data forms and Gestalt will be trained. The use of GITHUB and network techniques will be taught and transferred into www.quantlet.de. Direct computer oriented knowledge and possibilites of empirical research will be shown. The course is televised to NUS, Singapore. Together with the Dept STAT of NUS we present extremely practical examples from finance, neuroeconomics and network analysis.

Max. number of participants: 20 (application in the first session)

Time & venue:
Tuesdays, 9:00-12:00

Exam:
Seminar paper

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

This course can only be attended as BSE Core Course if you have successfully applied for the Econometrics Beginner's Track (PhD in Economics). More information can be found in the BSE PhD Handbook.

Estimation and testing in the general linear model, generalized least squares estimation, asymptotic theory, maximum likelihood estimation and likelihood based testing, nonlinear regression models, stochastic regressors, instrumental variable estimation, (generalized) method of moments.

Literature:
Davidson, R. and MacKinnon, J.G. (2004): Econometric Theory and Methods, Oxford University Press.
Hayashi, F. (2000): Econometrics, Princeton University Press.

Time & venue:
Lectures: Mondays, 10:00-12:00 (starting on 25.10.2021), and Tuesdays, 8:00-10:00 (starting on 19.10.2021)
Tutorials: Thursdays, 14:00-16:00 (starting on 21.10.2021), or Fridays 12:00-14:00 (starting on 22.10.2021)

Exam:
Written exam

More information can be found on Moodle. Moodle key: ...

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Part I (Anton Velinov): The first part of the course covers selected topics fundamental to understand and apply econometric methods in research. These topics include: revision of OLS and asymptotics, single and multiple equation GMM, panel data methods, and state space models. For more information about the course content and organization, please visit http://avelinov.byethost7.com/econ_meth.html (materials will be updated soon).
 

Part II (Simone Maxand): The second part of the course will provide survey of the theory of time series methods in (advanced) econometrics. We will cover (classical) topics including univariate stationary and non-stationary models, vector autoregressions, vector error correction models and both univariate and multivariate models for volatility. Empirical applications in the course will be drawn from macroeconomics. For more information about the course content and organization, please visit Moodle (materials will be updated soon).

Literature:
tba

Time & venue:
Lectures: Fridays, 10:00-14:00 (starting on 22.10.2021); HU, School of Business and Economics, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Tutorials: Mondays, 9:00-11:00 (starting on 25.10.2021); HU, School of Business and Economics, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203

Exam:
tba

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

In this seminar, the participants shall prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the ongoing Corona crisis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (e.g. various fiscal and monetary policies, but also related to the labour market and social and family policies) and their effects and effectiveness. The effectiveness should take into account a short run as well as a long run perspective. How will the crisis and the policy responses to it change the functioning of the economy and society in the long run? How has the crisis changed our understanding of the functioning of economy and society? The paper can be empirical or theoretical. While it should have a strong policy focus, it should also explicitly build on the academic literature.

Part of the course: Ungraded presentation and discussion.

Time & venue:
To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes.
Discussion of seminar topics: 02.11.2021, 10:00-13:00 & 09.11.2021, 10:00-13:00, DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall or online
Presentation and discussion of seminar papers: 08.02.2022, 10:00-14:00 & 10.02.2022, 10:00-14:00, DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall or online

Registration:
Max. number of participants: 20
Please register between 11.10.2021 and 15.10.2021 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de (please indicate your program and matriculation number).

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course aims to introduce the student to current methods in Empirical Industrial Organization (EIO). In the first part of the course, we deal with the structural approach developed in the so called “New Empirical Industrial Organization” (NEIO) framework. After an introductory overview of the historical developments in the field of EIO, we start by looking at techniques for demand estimation in homogeneous and differentiated products markets. We then move to the simultaneous analysis of demand and supply relationships and compare various methods for estimating firms’ market power and strategic interactions based on static game-theoretic models of oligopolistic competition. Next, we focus on analyzing firms’ production decision and discuss structural models to estimate production function and productivity. In the final part of the course, we will look at applications of these techniques to evaluate public policies such as merger control and regulation. We conclude with a discussion of empirical techniques to detect collusion.

Learning Outcomes:
A range of econometric tools has been developed to analyze the behavior of firms and consumers to understand the functioning of markets. This course aims to provide students the ability to formulate, estimate and interpret demand and supply schedules as well as the degree of market power by firms. These are then used to make causal inference on market related policies. A key ingredient of the course is the application of these methods to actual data in programming sessions.
Discussions during the lecture and seminar, a presentation, and several homeworks will help improving the student's research, writing and presentation skills.

Literature:
Berry, Steve and Ariel Pakes, (2003): “Empirical Models of Firms and Markets,” Lecture notes.
Reiss, Peter C. and Frank Wolak, (2008): “Structural Econometric Modeling: Rationales and Examples from Industrial Organization,” in J.J. Heckman and E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 64 Elsevier. (http://www.stanford.edu/~preiss/makeit.pdf).
Ackerberg, Daniel, C. Lanier Benkard, Steve Berry, and Ariel Pakes, (2008): “Econometric Tools for Analyzing Market Outcomes, ” in J.J. Heckman and E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 63 Elsevier. (https://web.stanford.edu/~lanierb/research/tools8l-6-8.pdf).
Angrist J. D. and J.-S.Pischke, (2010): “The Credibility Revolution in Empirical Economics: How Better Research Design is Taking the Con out of Econometrics,” Journal of Economic Perspective, 24, 3-30. (http://econ.lse.ac.uk/staff/spischke/AP%20JEP.pdf)
Einav Liran and Jonathan Levin, (2010): “Empirical Industrial Organization: A Progress Report,” Journal of Economic Perspective, 24, 145-162. (http://www.stanford.edu/~jdlevin/Papers/IO.pdf)
Davidson Russell and James G. MacKinnon, (2004): Econometric Theory and Methods, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Motta, Massimo (2004): Competition Policy. Theory and Practice, Cambridge University Press.

Time & venue:
Depending on the number of students the course is either offered weekly on Wednesday/Thursday or it will be offered as a block course with 4 two-full-days blocks.

Exam:
The portfolio examination consists of the following elements, adding up to a maximum of 100 credits.
3 homeworks 60%
1 presentation 20%
1 final exam 20%

 

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course provides an overview on the economic analysis of labor markets. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, human capital, education and training, changes in the wages structure and inequality, biased technological change and returns to skills, organizational change and skill demand, the closing gender gap. The introduction of topics will be on textbook level, but the focus will be on the discussion of empirical implementation strategies used in recent publications.

Literature:
R. Ehrenberg and R. Smith, 2003, Modern Labor Economics;
P. Cahuc and A. Zylberberg, 2004, Labor Economics;
Selected journal articles

Time & venue:
Mondays, 12:00-16:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)

Exam:
Written exam

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The lecture will cover the most important aspects of the European economic development from the turn of the 19th century to the outbreak of the First World War. Topics include the Industrial Revolution, population growth and migration, international trade, the Gold Standard, as well as the economics of nationalism, colonialism and war. In the tutorial, we will discuss key texts and important concepts.

Literature:
Broadberry, S.; O’Rourke, K. (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.

Time & venue:
Lectures: Tuesdays, 14:00-16:00
Tutorials: Thursdays, 14:00-16:00

Exam:
Written exam

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday, 08:00am to Saturday, 06:00pm at University of Potsdam, Campus Griebnitzsee | Building 7, Room 2.41
Description:

This three-day workshop targets students who have no or very little prior experience with laboratory experiments. You learn the basics of experimental methodology, rules you have to observe, and a lot about practical issues you have to think about when planning an experiment. The main part of the workshop is an introduction into programming simple experiments with z-Tree as well as running a session in practice.

Day 1: Lecture-style teaching: experimental methodology, running a session

  • What kind of research questions can we answer with an experiment?
  • Advantage of experiments: having control
  • Important rules:
    • No deception!
    • Incentives
  • External validity
  • Design aspects
  • Practical issues
  • Hypothesis testing

Day 2 & 3: Hands-on programming in z-Tree

  • Fundamentals
    • What can we do with z-Tree?
    • How does z-Tree work?
    • Installation and test environment
    • Structure of a program
  • Individual decisions
    • Layout
    • Basic programming
    • Data of the experiment
  • Interactive decisions
    • Statements and functions in z-Tree
    • Loops
    • Matching and role assignment
    • Different tables in z-Tree
    • Chat

Time & venue:
4.-6.11.2021, 8:00-18:00, University of Potsdam, Campus Griebnitzsee | Building 7, Room 2.41

Exam:
Programming an experiment and presenting it.

Registration:
Please register with Maximilian Späth via email to maximilian.spaeth@uni-potsdam.de until 21.10.2021.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Current research topics in Finance.

Time & venue:
Thursdays, 14:00-16:00

More information can be found here.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course aims at enabling students to conduct research in promising areas in macroeconomics. One area aims to identify the effects of fiscal and monetary policy using micro datasets. Further "hot" areas are macro and inequality, the role of expectations in macro, and macrofinance. In a first step, we read and discuss recent papers and some classics. The fruitful discussions and the intensive engagement with the topics should lead to the development of independent research ideas.

Literature:
tba

Time & venue:
Wednesdays, 14:00-16:00

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Graduate students in the field of econonometrics and applied labor markets present and discuss their ongoing research projects.

Time & venue:
Thursdays, 16:00-17:15

More information can be found on Moodle.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The objective of this course is to teach M.A. and Ph.D. students to use macroeconomic concepts and techniques for their own research and incorporates a higher degree of formal analysis than in the introductory master’s lecture (IAMA).

Part I (Prof. Burda): Methods of modern macroeconomics for researchers in the field. Stationary Markov environments, statespace methods, stochastic difference equations. Dynamic programming and Lagrangian methods, complete markets, dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, solution techniques. The Ramsey problem.

Part II (Prof. Weinke): Dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models for positive and normative macroeconomic analysis. To this end a number of theoretical and empirical concepts are presented: The computation of impulse response functions, structural vector autoregressions, as well as an introduction to structural estimation. On the normative side the concept of Ramsey optimal policy is presented.

Literature:
Reference list (Prof. Burda): Ljungqvist and Sargent, Recursive Macroeconomics, 4th edition (MIT Press, USA: 2018); selected journal articles.
Reference list (Prof Weinke): Selected articles.

Time & venue:
Lectures: Wednesdays, 8:30-12:00

Exam:
Written exam

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 09:00am at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Description:

Management Science I

Part 1: The organization of science
Instructor: Henry Sauermann

Part 2: Innovation, intellectual property rights and the market for technology
Instructor: Stefan Wagner

Please see schedule and syllabus for Part 1 attached.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Time & venue:
Fridays, 10:00-12:00

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course is devoted to the core elements of microeconomics. We study both the economics of households and the economics of firms and introduce general equilibrium with particular attention to the two welfare theorems. We also examine decisions under uncertainty, introducing expected and non-expected utility theories. The analysis of choice under uncertainty leads to the examination of financial markets and to strategic interaction problems, which we introduce through the key notions in noncooperative game theory, in particular Nash equilibrium and its most important refinements. Also matching problems will be discussed.

Literature:
Mas-Colell, A., Whinston, M.D. and J.R. Green (1995), Microeconomic Theory, Oxford University Press

Time & venue:
Lectures: Mondays, 12:00-16:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)
Tutorials: Thursdays, 14:00-16:00 (starting on 28.10.2021), or Fridays, 16:00-18:00 (starting on 29.10.2021)

Exam:
4 written midterms and 1 written final exam

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 10:00am to Friday, 03:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

The Preparatory Math Course aims to equip students with the necessary math background for the first year (compulsory) economics graduate level courses. It is mainly meant to be a refresher of existing math knowledge.

More information (syllabus, schedule, course documents, access to the online course) can be found here.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This seminar is open to advanced Master students interested in empirical economic research in the field of social policy and labor markets and to PhD students who specialize in the field of applied microeconomics, in particular, in empirical work striving to identify causal effects (e. g, by applying quasi-experimental methods). The seminar aims to help students kick starting their first research project respectively first research paper. This course offers students a forum to present and discuss their first own research project. Presentation of early stage research projects or research ideas is encouraged. Active participation in all weekly meetings is mandatory. Extensive feedback will be provided on the research project, including recommendations on how to proceed with their research agenda towards their dissertation. The seminar will be also devoted to questions concerning the writing of papers (e.g., abstract and introduction).

Time & venue:
Thursdays, 14:00-15:30

Exam:
Presentation of own research work, co-presentation/discussion of another participant's work, active participation in discussions during seminar

Registration:
To register, please send an email with an abstract of your current/planned research project (< 450 words) to economics@jfki.fu-berlin.de until 11.10.2021.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This seminar is geared toward students who are at the beginning of their second or third year. The seminar aims to help students kick-starting and receive active feedback on their research projects in micro economic theory. Presentation of early stage research projects or research ideas is highly encouraged. The seminar offers students a forum to present and discuss their own research project. Extensive feedback will be provided.

Time & venue:
Wednesdays, 16:00-18:00

More information can be found on Moodle.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course explores the literature on Financial Intermediaries. It aims to provide a broad overview over classic papers as well as to identify potential gaps and deficiencies in current, ongoing research. As such, the course is relevant for students who aim to pursue career options in financial regulation/ central banks or just want a general background as well as for students who are looking for their own research topics in Financial Intermediation.

The course starts with a lecture-style presentation of the overarching research themes. Seminar participants will then present and discuss classic papers as well as current unpublished papers.

Literature:
Academic papers

Time & venue:
Mondays, 10:00-12:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)

Exam:
Term paper

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Research seminar.

Time & venue:
Tuesdays, 16:00-18:00

More information can be found on Moodle.

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Instructor:
Description:

Social or other-regarding preferences refer to preferences of economic agents regarding other people’s outcomes. These preferences can be both benevolent and malevolent, but crucially they differ from selfish preferences without any regard for others. The course provides an introduction to key evidence about the relevance of social preferences in economic interaction as well as the most important theoretical approaches that aim at explaining these results.

Most of the discussed evidence will be from controlled laboratory experiments. Critique regarding the relevance of (laboratory) experiments on social preferences will be discussed as well. Apart from methodological critique, experimental studies that critically reflect on prominent papers and research agendas will be presented in order to highlight the relevance of apparent subtleties in experimental design.

Specific requirements:
Some knowledge of game theory is helpful, but fairly basic experience is mostly sufficient. Knowledge of statistical analysis will make it easier to follow the data analysis in the experimental papers and thus enable a more critical view, but is not strictly necessary.

Part of the seminar is an ungraded presentation.

Literature:
The course literature consists of a list of journal articles. Some key articles are below, further literature will be announced during the course.

Andreoni, James (1995). Cooperation in Public Goods Experiments: Kindness or Confusion? American Economic Review 85(4), 891-904.
Andreoni, James and John H. Miller (2002). Giving According to GARP: An Experimental Test of the Consistency of Preferences for Altruism. Econometrica 70(2), 737-753.
Bénabou, Roland and Jean Tirole (2006). Incentives and prosocial behavior. American Economic Review 96(5). 1652-1678.
Blanco, Mariana, Dirk Engelmann, and Hans-Theo Normann (2011). A Within-Subject Analysis of Other-Regarding Preferences. Games and Economic Behavior 72(2), 321-338.
Bolton, Gary E. and Axel Ockenfels (2000). ERC: A Theory of Equity, Reciprocity and Competition. American Economic Review 90(1), 166-193.
Dufwenberg, Martin, Paul Heidhues, Georg Kirchsteiger, Frank Riedel, and Joel Sobel (2011). Other-Regarding Preferences in General Equilibrium. Review of Economic Studies 78(2), 613-639.
Engelmann, Dirk and Martin Strobel (2004). Inequality Aversion, Effciency, and Maximin Preferences in Simple Distribution Experiments. American Economic Review 94(4), 857-869.
Fehr, Ernst and Simon Gächter (2000). Cooperation and Punishment in Public Goods Experiments. American Economic Review 90(4), 980-994.
Fehr, Ernst and Klaus M. Schmidt (1999). A Theory of Fairness, Competition and Cooperation. Quarterly Journal of Economics 114(3), 817-868.
Levitt, Steven D. and List, John A. (2007). What Do Laboratory Experiments Measuring Social Preferences Reveal About the Real World? Journal of Economic Perspectives 21(2), 153-174.
Nikiforakis, Nikos, 2008. Punishment and Counter-punishment in Public Good Games: Can we Really Govern Ourselves? Journal of Public Economics 92(1-2), 91-112.
Early relevant surveys are provided in:
• Camerer, Colin F. (2003). Behavioral Game Theory, Princeton University Press. Chapter 2
• Ledyard, John (1995): Public Goods: A Survey of Experiment Research. In: John H. Kagel and Alvin E. Roth, Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton University Press.

Time & venue:
Tuesdays, 10:00-14:00

Exam:
Term paper

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The students learn the basic concepts of option pricing and its probabilistic foundations and stochastic processes in discrete time. Topics: Financial derivative, Option management, Basic concepts of probability theory, Stochastic processes in discrete time, Stochastic Integrals and differential equations, Black-Scholes option pricing model, Binomial model for European options and American options, Exotic options and interest rate derivatives. As a part of the course, an obligatory trip to the ECB European Central Bank will be organized.

Time & venue:
Mondays, 16:00-20:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)

Exam:
Oral exam

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at University of Potsdam, Campus Griebnitzsee, Seminar Room S12
Description:

Empirical research in international economics is characterized by a tight link between economic theory and econometric specifications. The course will introduce the structural approach to empirical research using the gravity model of international trade, which is the workhorse model in empirical trade research. Based on a theoretical derivation of the model, students will learn both how to estimate the corresponding structural econometric model and how to use the model to perform counterfactual policy analysis. Using the trade gravity expression as a starting point, closely related models for example for international migration, FDI flows, or carbon emissions embodied in international trade will also be considered. The course will furthermore introduce a dynamic multicountry model of international trade, production, and investment, discuss its calibration, and show how it can be used to assess a range of questions in international macroeconomics. Besides the lectures, the course will also contain computer sessions in which the students will implement the different estimations and simulations themselves.

Literature:
Compulsory reading:

  • Yotov, Y. V., R. Piermartini, J.-A. Monteiro, and M. Larch (2016): “An Advanced Guide to Trade Policy Analysis: The Structural Gravity Model,” World Trade Organization, Geneva.
  • Obstfeld, M. and K. Rogoff (2001): “The Six Major Puzzles in International Macroeconomics: Is There a Common Cause?”, In: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2000, vol. 15. MIT Press, pp. 339–390.
  • Eaton, J., S. Kortum, and B. Neiman (2016): “Obstfeld and Rogoff’s International Macro Puzzles: A Quantitative Assessment”, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 72, pp. 5-23.

Further reading will be provided in the lectures and the moodle course.

Time & venue:
Thursdays, 10:00-12:00 (starting on 28.10.2021); University of Potsdam, Campus Griebnitzsee, Seminar Room S12

Exam:
One presentation, one referee report, and one term paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:
  1. Vector Autoregressive Models
  2. Vector Error Correction Models
  3. Structural VAR Tools
  4. Bayesian VAR Analysis
  5. Identication by Short-Run Restrictions
  6. Identication by Long-Run Restrictions
  7. Inference for Impulse Responses
  8. Sign Restrictions
  9. Identication by Heteroskedasticity or Non-Gaussianity
  10. Identication Based on External Instruments
  11. Structural VAR Analysis in a Data-Rich Environment
  12. Nonfundamental Shocks

Literature:
Lutz Kilian and Helmut Lutkepohl (2017), Structural Vector Autoregressive Analysis, Cambridge University Press.
Helmut Lutkepohl (2005), New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer-Verlag.

Time & venue:
16 x 90 min lectures during the period 11 - 22 October 2021, 9:00-12:30. DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin.

Exam:
The grade for the course will be based on a paper which is due shortly after the end of the course. Details will be announced in class.

Registration:
Please register via email to jmetzner@diw.de.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The Economics of Climate Policy is an introductory course into the economics of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies. Essentially, the mitigation of climate change is a global public good, posing policy challenges both at the national level (within countries) as well as at the international level (between countries). In the course, concepts such as market failures, externalities, and Pigouvian taxes are developed and applied to climate change. Game theory will be introduced to understand the challenges in international climate negotiations. The history and status quo of international negotiations will be reviewed, as well as implementation policies such as the EU ETS and Germany’s Energiewende. Since these concepts can be applied to many public policy problems, the course is also an introduction into allocation theory, environmental economics, public finance and game theory.

The course consists of a lecture and a tutorial. The lecture provides reasoning, theory, and the narrative. The tutorial provides analytical concepts, formal models, and mathematical techniques.

Topics:
Starting from the perspective of decentralized decision making and coordination, we provide a systematic overview of the relevant issues in climate change policy. This includes, inter alia:

  • Climate change as a market failure: externalities and public goods, internalization options such as Pigouvian tax and cap and trade systems (prices vs. quantities), policy instrument design
  • Game theory, behavioral economics and Elinor Ostrom’s approaches to govern commons
  • The international politics of climate change: the history and status quo of UNFCCC climate negotiations from Rio to Kyoto and Paris, incentives for countries to reduce emissions: co-benefits, double dividend, and climate agreements
  • Climate policies today: The European Union Emission Trading scheme (EU ETS), Germany’s Energiewende, and the U.S. EPA Clean Power Plan

Literature:

Obligatory readings (along with the course)

Recommended readings (to prepare for the course)

Time & venue:
Lectures: Fridays, 15:00-17:00
Tutorials: Mondays, 10:00-12:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)

Exam:
Students will be graded based on weekly problem sets (homework assignments) and a mid-term exam (date to be announced); there is no final exam. Make sure you attend the course from the beginning on, as we start with assignments immediately. Ph.D. students will be asked to take an oral exam in addition to the assignments and the mid-term exam.

Please submit your contact details here to receive relevant information: Registration. Once you have registered, we will put you on our email list. Course material, such as slides and assignments, will be provided via the Information System for Instructors and Students (ISIS) of the TU Berlin. Assignments can be submitted electronically or handed in in class.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Description:

Search and matching frictions as a fundamental and defining attribute of labor markets. Role of matching frictions in models of employment, unemployment, and other phenomena. Introduction to search theory in partial equilibrium settings. On-the-job search and wage distributions in general equilibrium. Models of wage-posting. Jovanovic's model. Implications for labor market institutions and macroeconomic analysis.

Literature:
Specialized literature, script.

Time & venue:
Lectures: Mondays, 10:00-12:00 (starting on 25.10.2021)
Tutorials: Thursdays, 8:00-10:00 (starting on 28.10.2021)

Exam:
Written exam

More information can be found on Moodle.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
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