Courses

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Please check with the BSE Handbook which mandatory courses you have to choose in your PhD track. Not all courses listed here can be approved as Core Courses for all BSE PhD tracks.

Instructor:
Friday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Description:

The objective of this course is that students are able to (i) understand and critically evaluate seminal research in accounting and (ii) use these skills to develop an exposé for a research project that has the potential to contribute to extant literature. The course entails group discussions of seminal papers that identify fundamental questions in accounting research and that use innovative methods to address such questions.

Students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) actively participating during the reading group sessions and (ii) writing and presenting an exposé for a research project.

Enrolment into the Accounting Reading Group is possible at the beginning of each semester. Maximum number of participants: 20

Registration: via Email to Ulf Brüggemann (u.bruggemann@hu-berlin.de) until April 12, 2021.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 08:30am to 10:00am at online
Wednesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Thursday, 08:30am to 10:00am at online
Description:

The module Advanced Data Analytics for Management Support (ADAMS) introduces students to the latest developments in the scope of data-driven management support. It covers relevant theories and concepts in machine learning against the background of concrete real-world applications in management science. Special emphasize is given to the analysis of textual data and other forms of complex data such as sequences or images. Corresponding data is typically approached using the framework of deep artificial neural networks. The module recognizes the importance of deep learning and elaborates on corresponding methodologies. Frameworks and practices to use advanced (deep) machine learning technology and deploy corresponding solutions are of critical importance and will be elaborated in tutorial sessions.

The topics covered in the module include but are not limited to:

  • Fundamentals of artificial neural networks
  • Recurrent and convolutional neural networks for sequential data processing
  • Fundamentals of natural language processing(NLP)
  • Text embedding and language models
  • Sentiment Analysis
  • Approaches for NLP transfer learning

The module is designed as a follow-up to the module Business Analytics and Data Science (BADS). We expect students to have completed that module prior to taking ADAMS. More specifically, it is strongly recommended to join this module with a solid understanding of (supervised) machine learning practices and algorithms. Some experience in Python programming is also expected since we use the Python programming language in tutorials. The grading of the module will be based on a practical assignment, which also involves Python programming.

Literature:

A Zhang, ZC Lipton, M Li, AJ Smola (2020) Dive into Deep Learning, interactive deep learning book with code. https://d2l.ai/

Exam:

Term paper

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=94480

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Thursday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Description:

The Marshallian paradigm of the labor market and the foundations of labor demand and labor supply; human capital; wage determination; labor market imperfections and institutional constraints; introduction to search theory.

Literature:

Pierre Cahuc, Stéphane Carcillo and André Zylberberg, Labor Economics, 2nd edition (MIT Press, 2014) ISBN: 9780262027700;
Tito Boeri and Jan van Ours, The Economics of Imperfect Labor Markets, 2nd edition (Princeton University Press, 2013) ISBN: 9780691158938;
Course “Script”

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: tba

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Thursday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Description:

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms' objectives and marketing activities. In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms' objectives. In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data. Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Exam:

Portfolio exam: 3 assignments

  1. assignment: learn and understand how to use the statistical package R for data prepration and data analysis (non-graded)
  2. assignment: learn and understand how to estimate price elasticities and promotional uplifts with log-log-models applying modern econometric tools, make use of modern statistical software packages and learn how to document and interpret the estimation results carefully.
  3. assignment: learn and understand how to estimate parameters of an aggregate logit demand models using of modern statistical software packages and learn how to document and interpret the results from these models carefully.

The final grade will be given for the portfolio of all three assignments.

More information can be found on Moodle: tba

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Tuesday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start by a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is at center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Literature:

Galí, Jordi (2015): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle, Princeton University Press.
Further literature: see Moodle

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=104076

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 08:30am to 10:00am at online
Friday, 12:15pm to 01:45pm at online
Description:

This course focuses on the current workhorse models and solution methods in international macroeconomics. The goal of the course is to provide students with the tools to read and replicate papers from the current literature and start their own research projects in the field. The first part of the course stays close to the book by Uribe and Schmitt-Grohe (henceforth USG, see citation below). This part will take up two thirds of the term. In the last third of the term we will branch off to cover some topics based on recent influential research papers. The course will cover the following topics, concepts and numerical methods. The pace of the course and focus on particular topics might be adjusted to participants' progress and interests.

Topics: International business cycles; nominal and real exchange rates; capital flows and reversals; exchange rate policies; financial stability and macroprudential policies; sovereign default; monetary unions

Concepts: Open endowment and production economies; nominal rigidities and unemployment; limited commitment; financial frictions; pecuniary externalities; social planner and constrained efficiency; equilibrium multiplicity

Numerical methods: Local solution methods (linearization and perturbation); interpolation; global solution methods with a focus on occasionally binding constraints (value function iteration, policy function iteration and parameterized expectations)

Literature:

The main textbook for the course is:
Uribe, M. and Schmitt-Grohe, S. (2017) Open Economy Macroeconomics, Princeton University Press.
Further literature in the form of published research papers will be provided during the semester.

Exam:

Witten exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=103416

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 08:15am to 11:45am at online
Description:

One of the drivers of firm performance is an understanding of the behavior and motivation of its employees. This course is for advanced Master and Ph.D. students interested in deepening their knowledge of managerial and personnel economics. It continues the discussion from the Personnel Economics and Incentives in Organization courses. It focuses on the intersection of behavioral, experimental, and empirical studies about the impact of organizational practices (e.g., incentives, leadership, hierarchy, communication) on employee behavior. In particular, this course is about the HR and behavioral determinants of firm performance.

One of the key elements of successful management is asking and answering the right questions. In this seminar, students read selected economic papers, identify their research questions, critically examine them, and engage in scientific discourse with fellow course participants. The students elaborate their ideas in a group, develop them further into research proposals, write an essay, and hold a presentation in front of the course audience.

The seminar aims to develop students in three specific ways. First, students will learn about state-of-the-art research results from personnel economics and acquire knowledge helpful in
their prospective management career. Second, the students will deepen their skills of critical thinking and thoughtful evaluation of (i) management practices; and (ii) empirical evidence
from the field of personnel management. Third, the seminar will provide guidance and practice in conducting research and writing a research paper.

The students pursue these goals through a mixture of lectures, discussions, hands-on exercises, individual and group work, and student presentations.

Class hours and place

On Fridays: 16.4.2021, 30.4.2021, 28.5.2021, 11.6.2021, 25.6.2021, and 9.7.2021
Always from 8:15 am till 11:45 am.

Because the course is cumulative and builds on the content discussed in the first sessions, joining the seminar will not be allowed after the first class on 16th of April. Registered participants are expected to attend all sessions and participate in all group activities!

The seminar takes place in the seminar room **tba** or online. In the case of a ‘digital semester’ due to the pandemic, all meetings will take place via zoom during the same time slots.

Please register to the seminar by sending an email to Christine Jahnke (mktg@wiwi.hu-berlin.de) until 22nd of March, 2021.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 04:00pm to 08:00pm at online
Description:

Learning objectives: Students gain knowledge of recent advances in migration economics, particularly applied empirical analyses in the intersection of migration, economic development, political economy and labor economics with a focus on migration based changes in preferences, norms, and values in host and home communities. They are able to critically evaluate research on these topics and assess strengths and weaknesses of causal claims in economics papers. Students are equipped to present papers in an academic setting. The students are able to identify gaps in the literature and develop research proposals that are empirically sound and add to the body of work in migration economics in a meaningful way.

Preconditions: The module “Econometric Methods” or equivalent knowledge is recommended.

Lecture: What is the effect of migration on cultural change? In this course, we will look at the effects of international and regional migration on the economic and cultural dynamics at the destination and the origin countries. Synthesizing the conclusions of a number of seminal studies in the field and analyzing their empirical strategies, we will identify and critically evaluate various channels through which migration can alter the political economy and the economic development of sending and receiving countries.

Exercise: Topics to be covered include: Instrumental variable methods, differences-in-differences, regression discontinuity design and other empirical strategies. There will be deep-dives into various papers, where students prepare referee reports.

Exam:

Portfolio exam: The first assignment is to draft referee reports for several research papers (each about 300 words). The second assignment is to give a presentation on one research paper and give one presentation of a paper critique. The third assignment is to draft an original research proposal (about 2,500 words) related to the field of migration and cultural economics. The final grade will be given/will be awarded for the portfolio of all three assignments.

Or written exam (90 min).

The form of examination will be announced by Mrs. Sardoschau at the beginning of the semester.

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=104095

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 02:15pm to 05:30pm at online
Description:

The course will provide an introduction to the core concepts of auction theory. The learning experience will be enriched with case studies from auctions in the lab and in the field. Successful participants can solve optimal-bidding problems in standard auction forms, using advanced mathematical techniques. They first model the informational environment in a given application, using probability theory, and, second, use optimization theory to find optimal bidding strategies. Insights from mechanism design will enable them to design and solve novel auction formats. They learn to model both roles in seller-buyer environments.

Literature:

Vijay Krishna - Auction Theory, Academic Press, 2009

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found here: https://www.mikro.tu-berlin.de/menue/studium_und_lehre/uebersicht/auction_theory/

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
at online
Description:

This student-led reading group covers a diverse selection of recently published and unpublished work in behavioral economics and related fields. Its goal is to familiarize participants with current topics and methods in behavioral economics and expand critical thinking abilities with respect to research papers. Each week, students meet to discuss a selected paper. One participant is in charge of leading the discussion on a rotational basis, but all participants are expected to have read the paper in detail.

The reading group is is primarily targeted towards second year PhD students, but also open to other groups. It is recommended that participants have a grasp of core concepts of behavioral economics and are familiar with techniques in (experimental) data analysis.

Exact time slot will be jointly decided upon by reading group attendees.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

To attend the reading group, please register with Hedda Nielsen (nielsenh@hu-berlin.de) and Julia Baumann (julia.baumann@hu-berlin.de).

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 11:15am at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall or online
Description:

In this seminar, the participants shall prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the ongoing Corona crisis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (e.g. various fiscal and monetary policies, but also related to the labour market and social and family policies) and their effects and effectiveness. The effectiveness should take into account a short run as well as a long run perspective. How will the crisis and the policy responses to it change the functioning of the economy and society in the long run? How has the crisis changed our understanding of the functioning of economy and society? The paper can be empirical or theoretical. While it should have a strong policy focus, it should also explicitly build on the academic literature.

Part of the Seminar: Ungraded presentation and discussion.

Course times:

To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

April 27, 2021 10:00-13:00
April 29, 2021 10:00-13:00
July 7, 2021 10:00-14:00
July 8, 2021 10:00-14:00

Restriction to participation: 20

Registration:

29.03.2021 - 01.04.2021 via email to mfratzscher@diw.de (Please indicate your program and matriculation number.)

Exam:

Term paper

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=100266

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 10:00am at online
Description:

Researchers face the challenge to translate their academic results to policy makers and to the public. Often the results are derived using complex models, which are based on strong assumptions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods and skills, which allow to explain the models and the assumptions to policy makers and to the public and to derive results and policy conclusions based on the models. This course provides an introduction to communication of academic research to the public and to evidence based policy consulting.

Prerequisites

A mandatory prerequisite for the course is a completed scientific working paper. This is the basis for the policy paper developed during the class. In addition students need to have an excellent background in theoretical and empirical methods (Required courses are: Econometrics I or II and two courses out of Micro I&II, Macro I&II or ManSci I&II.) The course is designed for PhD students in the second or third year depending on the status of their first research paper.

 

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 08:30am to 10:00am at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 102 or online
Description:

In the first part of the lecture, microeconomically based theoretical and empirical approaches to the economics of education are discussed. In a second part, education economics approaches along the different educational sectors from early childhood to continuing education are discussed. Current empirically based research papers from the individual educational sectors will be presented and discussed.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 03:00pm at online
Description:

How to deal with environmental pollution and overuse of natural resources, like climate change, declining fish stocks or fossil fuel reserves? This course develops an economic perspective on the analysis of and ways to deal with external effects and intertemporal trade-offs – being the root of many public good and open access problems centered around emissions of pollutants and extraction of renewable or non-renewable resources. The course covers a now established literature stemming from an originally neoclassical approach to sustainability problems, and integrates it with complementary approaches, in particular from institutional economics (e.g. the work of Elinor Ostrom), and from systems science.

Participating students follow lectures and discuss topics in seminars on the basic theory, combined with method training in dynamic optimization, game theory and institutional analysis. They team-up in groups to conduct a study on governing a particular self-selected environmental or resource problem.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus and on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=101445

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 02:00pm to 04:00pm at online
Thursday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Description:

The course deals with the economic development of Europe from the beginning of the First World War up to the current situation from a historical perspective. Key topics include the economics of the two wars, European hyperinflations, the great depression, the bloc-wise economic integration in Western and Eastern Europe, the Golden Age of Growth, the economics of stagflation, global integration and global imbalances in a long-run perspective.

Literature:

Stephen Broadberry, and Kevin H O'Rourke (eds) (2010) "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe" , Vol 2: 1870 to the Present, Cambridge.

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=95784

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 10:15am to 11:45am at online
Description:

This course provides advanced insights into experimental methods (laboratory and field experiments), applied in the area of financial and managerial accounting. Based on lectures and the discussion of different papers published in leading accounting journals, students will gain insights into the design, implementation, and statistical analysis of experiments and the interpretation of experimental results. The aim of this course is to endow students with sufficient knowledge to conduct experimental studies with high methodological rigor and to critically evaluate experimental studies in the field of accounting.

It is recommended that participants have passed the core courses and are familiar with fundamental concepts of causal inference and data analysis.

To obtain course credits, students have to present one topic in experimental accounting research and write a research proposal on answering an accounting-based research question with an experimental method (ca. 10.000 characters).

Course registration is open from 5.3.2021-5.4.2021 via Email: maik.lachmann@tu-berlin.de

Literature:

  • Brown/Evans/Moser (2009), “Agency theory and participative budgeting experiments“, Journal of Management Accounting Research, 21: 317-335
  • Libby/Bloomfield/Nelson (2002), “Experimental research in financial accounting”, Accounting, Organizations and Society, 27: 775-810
  • Sprinkle (2003), “Perspectives on experimental research in managerial accounting”, Accounting, Organizations, and Society, 28: 287-318
  • Luft (2016), “Cooperation and competition among employees: Experimental evidence on the role of management control systems”, Management Accounting Research, 31: 75-85
  • Wibbeke/Lachmann (2020), “Psychology in management accounting and control research: an overview of the recent literature”, Journal of Management Control, 31: 275-328.

Exam:

Portfolio: Presentation (50%) & written research proposal (50%)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday, 04:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Description:

This seminar focuses on recent developments in experimental economics. Each weak, students critically discuss one recent paper, with an emphasis on the experimental design and data analysis. A major objective of the course is for students to develop a great deal of familiarity with the design of experiments as a method for economic research. Participants are expected to attend all sessions and participate actively in the discussions.

It is recommended that participants have passed Introduction to Advanced Microeconomic Analysis and are familiar with fundamental concepts of causal inference and data analysis.

To obtain course credits, students have to submit 3 one-pagers (not graded) and write a final referee report (ca. 10.000 characters).

Course registration is open from 1.3.2021-5.4.2021. To register, students should send an email to Dr. Lea Heursen (lea.heursen@hu-berlin.de). In this email, students should write a short paragraph, describing what motivates them to take this seminar. If more than 20 students would like to take this seminar for credit, a lottery will determine the seats.

Exam:

Final referee report

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 08:00am to 06:00pm at tba
Description:

Time frame: 21.09.-24.09.2021, 08:00 – 18:00

Max. no. of participants: 5 from BSE, on top of the VHB participants (VHB course; international doctoral program ProDok)

Please register via email to bse.office@hu-berlin.de until July 15, 2021.

 

Description of course:

Abstract and Learning Objectives

Various robust deviations from rational decision making have been reported such as loss aversion, probability weighting, status quo bias, overconfidence etc. Understanding those deviations leads to a more realistic modelling of the behavior of different economic actors and to an increased prediction success. In this course, participants will understand those and other important deviations from rationality as well as their theoretical explanations/modelling, e.g., prospect theory and mental accounting. Most theories have been developed implementing psychological and economic experiments. Whereas psychological experiments are mostly asking the respondents for hypothetical choices, real decisions with actual monetary payoffs are implemented in economic experiments. Half of the course will be concerned with a profound introduction to the several deviations from rationality that have been reported with real decision makers and with the theoretical treatment of those deviations. The other half of the course will deal with different types of experiments and different experimental designs as well as the matching of research question and type of empirical method to be used.

Content

Whereas the first two days take the form of an interactive lecture and are mostly devoted to laying the basic knowledge in experimental research and behavioral decision theory, the next two days are devoted to specific applications of behavioral decision theory to selected topics in tax compliance, behavioral finance, behavioral insurance, entrepreneurial decisions, venture financing decisions, and consumer behavior. Whereas not all areas of business research are captured in the example studies, the applications are diverse as well as broad enough to have participants from different fields benefit from this course.

 

Selected Literature:

Friedman, D., Sunder, S. (1994): Experimental methods: A primer for economists. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK) and New York (USA).
Gigerenzer, G., Todd, P. M. and the ABC Research Group (1999): Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart. Oxford University Press, Oxford (UK).
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.

 

Essential Reading Material:

Reading Material (lecture)

A study of this part of the literature as well as the literature referenced under “selected literature” is obligatory for all participants.

Camerer, C. F. and Lovallo, D. (1999): Overconfidence and excess entry: An experimental approach. American Economic Review 89, 306-318.
Campbell, D. T. and Stanley, J. C. (1963): Experimental and quasi-experimental designs for research. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston.
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.
Samuelson, W. and Zeckhauser, R. (1988): Status quo bias in decision making. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 1, 7-59.
Sandri, S., Schade, C. D., Mußhoff, O., and Odening, M. (2010): Holding on for too long? - An experimental study on inertia in entrepreneurs' and non-entrepreneurs' disinvestment choices. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 76, 30-44.
Schade, C. D. (2005): Dynamics, experimental economics and entrepreneurship. Journal of Technology Transfer 30, 409-431.
Schade, C. D., Schröder, A., and Krause, K. (2010): Coordination after Gains and Losses: Is Prospect Theory's Value Function Predictive for Games? Journal of Mathematical Psychology 54, 426-445.
Shefrin, H. M. and Statman, M. (1985): The disposition to sell winners too early and ride losers too long: theory and evidence. Journal of Finance 40, 777-792.
Thaler, R. H. (1985): Mental accounting and consumer choice. Marketing Science 4, 199-214.

Reading Material (seminar)

Whereas it is assumed that everyone is having a deeper look into all of the following articles, each of the participants should prepare two or three of these papers intensively and be prepared to present the respective paper, discuss it, and formulate future research opportunities based on that paper. The presenters of the respective papers are fixed during the first seminar session (day 1).

Camerer, C. F. and Lovallo, D. (1999): Overconfidence and excess entry: An experimental approach. American Economic Review 89, 306-318.
Chan, C. S. R., & Park, H. D. (2015): How images and color of business plans influence venture investment screening decisions. Journal of Business Venturing 30, 732-748.
Charness, G. Gneezy, U. (2010): Portfolio Choice and Risk attitudes: An Experiment. Economic Inquiry 48, 133-146.
Franke, N., Gruber, M., Harhoff, D., Henkel, J. (2006): What you are is what you like: similarity biases in venture capitalists' evaluations of start-up teams. Journal of Business Venturing 21, 802-826.
Hallsworth, M., List, J., Metcalfe, R., Vlaev, I. (2014) (NBER Working Paper No. 20007): The Behavioralist As Tax Collector: Using Natural Field Experiments to Enhance Tax Compliance.
Koellinger, P., Minniti, M., and Schade, C. (2007): “I think I can, I think I can”: Overconfidence and entrepreneurial behavior. Journal of Economic Psychology 28, 502-527.
Schade, C., Kunreuther, H. C., and Koellinger, P. (2012): Protecting Against Low-Probability Disasters: The Role of Worry. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making 25, 534-543.
Schwartz, B., Ward, A., Monterosso, J., Lyubomirsky, S., White, K., Lehman, D. (2002): Maximizing Versus Satisficing: Happiness is a Matter of Choice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 83, 1178-1197.
Selten, R., Chmura, T., Pitz, T., Kube, S., Schreckenberg, M. (2007): Commuters route choice behavior. Games and Economic Behavior 58, 394-406.
Weber, M. and Zuchel, H. (2005), How Do Prior Outcomes Affect Risk Attitude? Comparing Escalation of Commitment and the House Money Effect. Decision Analysis 2, 30-43.
Weitzel, U., Urbig, D., Desai, S., Sanders, M., and Acs, Z. (2010): The good, the bad, and the talented. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 76, 64-81.
Zimmer, A., Gründl, H., Schade, C. D. and Glenzer, F. (2016): An incentive-compatible experiment on probabilistic insurance and implications for an insurer’s solvency level. Journal of Risk and Insurance. Published online first. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jori.12148/pdf

 

Exam:

to be announced

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 09:30am at online
Description:

The objective of the “Financial Accounting Research Group” (FARG) is to introduce select students to current research in financial accounting. Participants of the FARG will learn the necessary skills to understand conceptual underpinnings and common empirical design choices in this area of research.

The FARG is organized around the Finance-Accounting Research Seminar that provides a forum for invited guest speakers to present current research papers. Participants of the FARG are welcome to attend the accounting talks of this seminar and expected to join internal discussion meetings of our institute in preparation of these talks. There are usually three accounting talks and three preparatory discussion meetings per semester. For details on the schedules of current and past semesters, please see here: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/bwl/finance/seminars

Students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) participating in the FARG for at least two semesters and (ii) writing three reviews (or two
reviews and a discussion protocol) on papers that are presented by our guest speakers. Enrolment into the FARG is possible at the beginning of each semester. Details on the application procedure will be announced in early April (summer term) and early October (winter term) via the website of our institute.

The number of participants is limited to 20 students. Registration until 15 April 2021 via Email: u.bruggemann@hu-berlin.de

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday, 10:15am to 11:45am at online
Description:

The objective of the course is to give an overview over modern theories of economic growth. The formal presentation uses the continuous–time framework in order to equip the students with the formal tools required to analyze continuous–time economic dynamics. Besides looking at growth models, the lecture addresses also related topics like the distribution of wealth and income, exhaustible resources and stochastic growth models. The lecture is accompanied by a tutorial.

Contents:

  • Formal Prerequisites: Differential Equations and Theory of Optimal Control
  • The Neoclassical Growth Model
  • The Ramsey Model
  • First Generation Models of Endogenous Growth
  • Second Generation Model of Endogenous Growth
  • Stochastic Growth

Literature:

The following two books cover most of the topics addressed in the lecture:

Acemuglu, D., (2009), Introduction to Modern Economic Growth (Princeton University Press).
Barro, R. & Sala-i Martin, X., (2004), Economic Growth (MIT–Press), 3rd edn.

Further references and recommendations for further reading will be given during the course.

Exam:

Written exam/Problem sets

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Friday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=103739

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Thursday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

Panel data are omnipresent in economics. They come with many advantages: the resulting larger data sets enable more precise inference, observing individuals/rms/countries at multiple points in time allows to model and estimate dynamic responses to changes in variables of interest over time, and they can overcome some endogeneity concerns and hence contribute to a convincing identication strategy.

Naturally, adding time as a second dimension to the data does not come without challenges. The aim of the course is to both make the advantages of panel data clear and equip students with the tools and technical understanding to make use of their potential. Starting from the linear one- and two-way error component models, we will venture into different advanced challenges in panel econometrics, including dynamic, unbalanced, and non-linear panel models. In accompanying computer sessions, we will implement and use some of the estimators ourselves in the statistical software R.

The main accompanying textbook is "Econometric Analysis of Panel Data" (5th edition) by Badi Baltagi. Additional references will be provided in the lecture.

The course will be held online via Zoom on Thursdays from 10 to 12. The Zoom link will be shared with all participants before the first lecture, which will take place on April 15th, 2021.

Exam:

The course will be assessed based on a 90 minute exam which will contain both a theory and a computer part. There will be the additional opportunity to gain bonus points for the exam by completing optional computer exercises during the term. For PhD students, there will be an additional take-home exam component assessing the parts of the course that are additionally offered for the PhD level.

Please register by writing an email to joschka.wanner@uni-potsdam.de before April 12th, 2021.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday, 10:00am at online
Description:

Causal inference has become the predominant toolbox in empirical research. The aim of this course is to provide participants with a deeper understanding of microeconometric methods that allow to draw causal inference in many settings and discuss the most-recent advances. The course will have a block-structure where we first discuss causality based on the potential outcome framework. After a brief discussion of experimental methods, we will introduce different popular quasi-experimental methods such as matching, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables or regression discontinuity. We will discuss the identifying assumptions and the pros and cons of each method based on empirical examples. The lecture will also be complemented by practical computer sessions where the estimators will be implemented in STATA or R.

Topics:

  • Causality and the Potential Outcome Framework
  • Experiments
  • Matching
  • Difference-in-Differences
  • Instrumental Variables
  • Regression-Discontinuity Design

The course will be held in block structure between April 12 and June 22, 2021, with approximately seven lecture days (4 hours each) during the semester. The practical sessions – about six – will be blocked as well.

Updated course information will be available by March 22 under https://www.uni-potsdam.de/de/empwifo/studium-lehre/aktuelles-semester.html.

PhD students are asked to register by April 9 via huber@empwifo.uni-potsdam.de.

Literature:

paper-based. For an introduction, see Imbens G, Wooldridge J. (2009): Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation. Journal of Economic Literature, 2009;47(1):5-86.

Exam:

written exam (90 min) and term paper

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday, 04:15pm to 05:30pm at online
Wednesday, 08:30am to 09:45am at online
Description:

Corporations are the backbone of our economies. They employ us and provide us with goods and services. We invest our savings into them. They impact our ecological environment as well as our societies at large. Economic frictions make it necessary to monitor and regulate them. This requires some level of corporate transparency. In this course, transparency means the quality of information as generated, distributed, received, and processed by economic agents. Regulators, the media, and public interest activists have regularly criticized low levels of corporate transparency, while corporations have stressed the direct and indirect costs of corporate transparency as well as the risks of information overload. This has motivated the Collaborative Research Center TRR 266 “Accounting for Transparency” to develop a research program concentrated on corporate transparency.

This course is open for everybody who is interested in research on corporate transparency. It has been designed for Master and first year PhD students to get familiar with current research in this field and to take their first steps towards doing independent research on this topic. A set of leading academics from Europe and the U.S. will act as guest speakers and share their views on the field. After completing the course, students will understand its main findings and have reviewed them critically. Also, they will be able to develop research projects that add to this fascinating and relevant field. The course should be particularly useful for students in the area of business, economics and related social sciences that are interested in working this area. As an open online course, students and fellow academics from all institutions are encouraged to participate in the course.

Literature:

Will be announced during the course

Exam:

Class participation, Individual empirical assignments and a group project (see syllabus for details)

More information can be found in the syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday, 10:00am to 12:00pm at online
Description:

Discussion of current research papers in financial economics and related fields.

Prerequisites: "Advanced Financial Economics" (PhD level) or equivalent knowledge. Registration in the first session.

Literature:
Academic papers

Exam:
Term paper (30,000 characters)

More information can be found on Moodle: tba

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 06:00pm at online
Description:

The lecture deals with theoretical and practical concepts from the fields of statistical learning and machine learning. The main focus is on predictive modeling. The weekly tutorial applies these concepts and methods to real examples for illustration purposes. You are expected to work throughthe exercises for the tutorials. They will typically consist of proofs of theory and programming tasks like the implementation of algorithms.

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/course/view.php?id=90845#section-2

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm to 05:00pm at online
Description:

Course objectives

  • Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important.
  • Provide insights into strategy (especially, identification) in important papers in structural Labour, Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.
  • Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation.
  • Develop matrix programming skills using Matlab. Loops vs. vectorisation; readability vs. speed; sustainable coding for several projects.

More information about covered topics and references can be found in the attached syllabus.

Exam/ evaluation

If this course is taken for credits, the nal grade will be determined by

  • 2 problem sets (to be completed in groups of max. 2 participants), weighted 1/3 each, and
  • a final exam, weighted 1/3.
Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday, 12:00pm to 02:00pm at online
Thursday, 08:00am to 10:00am at online
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing time series data. The focus is on univariate modelling tools. The lecture begins with classical components models. Then we cover different types of stochastic processes like ARIMA and GARCH models, deal with the unit root methodology and procedures for forecasting as well as for the specification, estimation and validation of models. Multivariate extensions are demonstrated, with emphasis on vector autoregressive (VAR) processes and its application in causality and impulse response analyses. Nonstationary systems with integrated and cointegrated variables will also be treated. In the last session, a brief introduction to count time series, with particular emphasis in INAR(1) models and
their applications, will be introduced.

In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data. We will intensively make use of econometric software packages.

Classical components models; stochastic processes; stationarity; ARIMA processes, GARCH models; specification, estimation and validation of models; forecasting; unit root tests; multivariate extensions: VAR processes, causality and impulse response analysis, cointegrated processes. In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data.

Literature:

Hamilton, D.J. (1994). Time Series Analysis, Princeton University Press.
Lütkepohl, H. (2005). New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer Verlag, Heidelberg

Exam:

Written exam (90 min)

More information can be found on Moodle: https://moodle.hu-berlin.de/enrol/index.php?id=102841

Credits:
6.00
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