Courses

Please check with the BSE Handbook which mandatory courses you have to choose in your PhD track. Not all courses listed here can be approved as Core Courses for all BSE PhD tracks.

Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at SPA 1, Room 21b / 025
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA 1, Room 21b
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing time series data. The focus is on univariate modelling tools. The lecture begins with classical components models. Then we cover different types of stochastic processes like ARIMA and GARCH models, deal with the unit root methodology and procedures for forecasting as well as for the specification, estimation and validation of models. Multivariate extensions are demonstrated, with emphasis on vector autoregressive (VAR) processes and its application in causality and impulse response analyses. Nonstationary systems with integrated and cointegrated variables will also be treated.
In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data. We will intensively make use of econometric software packages. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.
Literature:

- Hamilton (1994). Time Series Analysis. Princeton, University Press.
- Schlittgen/Streitberg (2001). Zeitreihenanalyse. Oldenburg Verlag, München.
- Lütkepohl, H. (2005). New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis. Springer Verlag, Heidelberg.

Empirical Tutorials take place at room 025 (Mon)
Exam: written exam (90 min)
Credits (ECTS): 9.0

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
04:00pm to 07:00pm
at SPA1, R23
Description:

Advanced Experimental Economics introduces methods and models currently used in analyses of economic experiments. The focus will be on structural models used to estimate utility functions, depth of reasoning, and subject heterogeneity. The course covers the numerical and econometric methods required to conduct structural analyses and the current behavioral approaches to model utilities and beliefs. Methods and models are developed in relation to standard experimental games and code examples illustrate their application on actual data. The topics include the estimation of social preferences in non-strategic environments (such as dictator games), the estimation of beliefs in normal-form games of complete information (e.g. level-k and quantal response equilibrium), the estimation of preferences and beliefs in strategic games (such as ultimatum and public goods games), the estimation of beliefs and updating errors in games of incomplete information (such as auctions), and the estimation of strategies in repeated games.

For the first 10 weeks of the course, I cover the core material in lectures. Along the way, topics for term papers are assigned and the participants start working on their topics. The term papers will apply the discussed methods and models to analyze existing experimental data sets, e.g. by estimating preferences and beliefs. PhD students will write papers of about 15-20 pages length, Master students will write papers of about 8-10 pages length. In the concluding five weeks of the course, the participants present the results of their projects in the class.

- Literature:
M. J. Osborne and A. Rubinstein. A course in game theory, 1994. MIT Press.
C. F. Camerer. Behavioral game theory, 2003. Princeton University Press.
K. L. Judd. Numerical methods in economics, 1998. MIT Press.
K. Train. Discrete choice methods with simulation, 2009 (2nd edition). Cambridge University Press.
C. A. Holt. Markets, games and strategic behavior, 2006. Addison Wesley.

- Exam (written? If yes: One or two exam dates?): Term paper and presentation by the end of the course

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
09:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 23
Description:

Advanced Experimental Economics introduces the methods and models used in
analyses of economic experiments. The focus will be on structural models
used to estimate utility functions, belief hierarchies, and subject
heterogeneity. The course covers the numerical and econometric methods
required to conduct structural analyses and the current behavioral
approaches to model utilities and beliefs. Methods and models are
developed in relation to standard experimental games and code examples
illustrate their application on actual data. The topics include the
estimation of social preferences in non-strategic environments (such as
dictator games), the estimation of beliefs in normal-form games of
complete information, the estimation of preferences and beliefs in
strategic games (such as ultimatum and public goods games), the estimation
of beliefs and updating errors in games of incomplete information (such as
auctions), and the estimation of strategies in repeated games.

In the first ten meetings, I cover these topics in lectures. During these
meetings, the participants are being assigned topics for their later term
paper. The topics relate to those discussed in class, and the term paper
involves analyzing existing data using the discussed methods. In the
remaining five weeks, you will present your term papers (up to three
presentations per week). Presentations will be organized so that everybody
has at least six weeks from assignment of topic to presentation of
results.

Literature: (Background reading)
M. J. Osborne and A. Rubinstein. A course in game theory, 1994. MIT Press.
C. F. Camerer. Behavioral game theory, 2003. Princeton University Press.
K. L. Judd. Numerical methods in economics, 1998. MIT Press.
K. Train. Discrete choice methods with simulation, 2009 (2nd edition).
Cambridge University Press.
C. A. Holt. Markets, games and strategic behavior, 2006. Addison Wesley.

Exam:
The course is classified as seminar, students are evaluated based on a term paper (80%) and a classroom
presentation (20%).

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at DOR 1 , 3.04
Tuesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at DOR 1 , 3.04
Description:

This course links the fundamentals of corporate finance to its current frontier of research. Based on discussions of both theoretical and empirical papers, its focus lies on capital structure, investment decisions, corporate governance and cash and payout policies. It starts with the seminal classics shaping modern corporate-finance theory and is designed to prepare students for research in the field. Students will acquire in-depth familiarity with the standard models as well as the application of econometric techniques, and implement some in the bi-weekly accompanying tutorials.

Literatur:
Academic articles in the area of corporate finance

Exam: 90 min (100%)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
12:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

This course introduces the students to recent developments in empirical asset pricing. The central question addressed in the course is: What causes the fluctuations in prices of risky assets? This question has been a source of intense debate among financial economists over the last decades, with no resulting consensus. It has divided our profession into two broad groups, “rational” and “behavioral”. The course starts with a brief review of the basic concepts of the asset pricing theory. The main part of the course is divided into three sections:
1. Time-series facts and excess volatility
2. Cross-sectional facts and anomalies
3. Empirical methods
Each section will include (i) lectures, (ii) empirical work and (iii) student presentations and discussions of the papers from the reading list.

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Instructor:
Tuesday, 02:15pm at DOR1, 3.04
Description:

Capital-Structure Theory, Financial Constraints, Internal Capital Markets, Delegated Investment Management, Empirical Methods

Corporate Governance, Behavioral Finance, Corporate Risk Management

Financial Contracting: Decision and Control Rights, Strategic Default, Investor Monitoring: Takeovers

Implementation of models and calculations of select papers from the seminar using GNU/R.

A component of the Seminar is an ungraded presentation of research paper, referee report.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstr. 1, Room 005
Description:

see syllabus

Literature: academic papers

 

no exam, but seminar paper

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at Dorotheenstr. 1, room 005
Description:

Upon completion of the course, students will be familiar with arguments and approaches in modern corporate finance theory, will be able to apply these in their own research, and will be able to critically evaluate current research in this area.

Literature: There is no single textbook. We will use selected parts of Jean Tirole, “The Theory of Corporate Finance,” as well as current and classic papers.

Exam: Take-home exam/ referee report

Credits:
6.00
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Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 005
Description:

This course provides a theoretical and empirical treatment of major topics in corporate finance, including capital structure, investment decisions, corporate governance, corporate cash and payout policy, as well as credit ratings and financial regulation. The course is based on academic articles and designed for Ph.D. students interested in corporate finance. An integral part is the computer lab where students implement key models and econometric methods in GNU/R.

Literature:
Academic articles

Exam (written?):
No final exam. Grading is based on the contribution to class discussions (20%), presentation of research paper (15%), lab code (25%), seminar paper (40%).

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 005
Description:

This course provides a theoretical and empirical treatment of major topics in the area of corporate finance, including capital structure, investment decisions, corporate governance and corporate cash and payout policy. We will examine these issues from both neoclassical and behavioral perspectives.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at SPA1, 125
Description:

Tutorials: Tuesday (14-16) or Wednesday (16-18)

Venue of tutorials: SPA1, 21a

The course deals with patterns of international trade, both in theory and empirics. Starting with the classic Ricardian and Heckscher-Ohlin trade models, students will be ntroduced to modern models, such as Eaton & Kortum (2002), Melitz (2003) and Melitz & Ottaviano (2008). In the tutorial students will present recent selected papers.

Literature:Robert C. Feenstra: „Advanced International Trade “ (2003), Princeton University Press;
Jonathan Eaton and Samuel Kortum: “Technology, Geography and Trade“ (2002), Econometrica (Vol. 70, No. 5);
Marc J. Melitz and Giancarlo I.P. Ottaviano: “Market Size, Trade, and Productivity“ (2008) , Review of Economic Studies (Vol. 75).

Exam: Presentation (30 %, the presentation is mandatory) and written Exam (90 min, 70 %); two exam dates.

Credits:
6.00
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Tuesday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

The course deals with patterns of international trade, both in theory and empirics. Starting with the classic Ricardian and Heckscher-
Ohlin trade models, students will be introduced to modern models, such as Eaton & Kortum (2002), Melitz (2003) and Melitz &
Ottaviano (2008). In the tutorial students will present recent selected papers.
Ungraded but obligatory: presentation and two summaries (1 page each).
Literature: Robert C. Feenstra: „Advanced International Trade“ (2015), Princeton University Press;
Selected journal papers

Allgemeine Info:

Organisatorisches:
StO/PO MA 2005 - 2010: 6 LP, Modul: "Advanced International Trade: Theory and Empirics"
StO/PO MA 2016: 6 LP, Modul: "Advanced International Trade: Theory and Empirics"
StO/PO MEMS 2016: 6 LP, Modul: "Advanced International Trade: Theory and Empirics", Major: Macroeconomics

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 125
Description:

The course deals with patterns of international trade, both in theory and empirics. Starting with the classic Ricardian and Heckscher-
Ohlin trade models, students will be introduced to modern models, such as Eaton & Kortum (2002), Melitz (2003) and Melitz &
Ottaviano (2008). In the tutorial students will present recent selected papers.
Ungraded but obligatory: presentation and two summaries (1 page each).
Literature: Robert C. Feenstra: „Advanced International Trade“ (2015), Princeton University Press;
Selected journal papers

Exam: Written exam (90 min)

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22
Thursday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Description:

Formal foundations of labor demand and labor supply; and strengths and weaknesses of the Marshallian paradigm of the labor market. Human capital; theories of wage determination; labor market imperfections and institutional constraints; introduction to search and matching models.

Literature:
Pierre Cahuc, Stéphane Carcillo and André Zylberberg, Labor Economics, 2nd edition (MIT Press, 2014) ISBN: 9780262027700;
Tito Boeri and Jan van Ours, The Economics of Imperfect Labor Markets, 2nd edition (Princeton University Press, 2013) ISBN: 9780691158938;
Skript

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 02:00pm at SPA1, R220
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA1, R125
Description:

The Marshall paradigm of the labor market; the foundations of labor demand and labor supply; human capital; wage determination; labor market imperfections and institutional constraints; introduction to search theory.

Literatur : Pierre Cahuc, Stéphane Carcillo and André Zylberberg, Labor Economics, 2nd edition (MIT Press, 2014) ISBN: 9780262027700, Tito Boeri and Jan van Ours, The Economics of Imperfect Labor Markets, 2nd edition (Princeton University Press, 2013) ISBN: 9780691158938

Bemerkung: StO/PO MA 2005 - 2010: 6 LP, Modul: "Advanced Labor Economics"
StO/PO MA 2016: 6 LP, Modul: "Advanced Labor Economics"
StO/PO MEMS 2016: 6 LP, Modul: "Advanced Labor Economics", Major: Macroeconomics
Prüfung: Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:15pm to 01:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Thursday,
12:15pm to 01:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms’ objectives and marketing activities. In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms’ objectives. In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data. Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Literature:
Berry, S.T. (1994), Estimating Discrete-Choice Models of Product Differentiation, RAND Journal of Economics, Vol. 25 (2), 242-262.
Wooldridge, J.M. (2008), Introductory Econometrics, South-Western Cengage Learning, Chapters 2, 3 and 4, 68-166.
Chintagunta, P., V. Kadiyali and N. Vilcassim (2004), Structural Models of Competition: A Marketing Strategy Perspective, Assessing Marketing Strategy Performance, eds. C. Moorman and D. Lehmann, Cambridge: Marketing Science Institute, 95-113.
Nevo, A. (2000), A Practitioner’s Guide to Estimation of Random-Coefficient Logit Models of Demand, in: Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Vol. 9(4), 513-548.
Train, K.E. (2009), Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10.
https://onlinecourses.science.psu.edu/stat501/node/2
Anderson, S.P., de Palma A. and Thisse, J.-F. (1992), Discrete Choice Theory of Product Differentiation, The MIT Press.
Dubin, J. A. (1998), Studies in Consumer Demand – Econometric Methods Applied to Market Data, Kluwer Academic Publishers Group.
Franses, P.H. and Paap, R. (2010), Quantitative Models in Marketing Research, Cambridge University Press.
Hanssens, D.M., Parsons, L.J. and Schultz, R.L. (2003), Market Response Models: Econometric and Time Series Analysis, Kluwer Academic Publishers Group.
Leeflang, P.S.H, Wieringa, J.E., Bijmolt, T.H.A and Pauwels, K.H. (2015), Modeling Markets – Analyzing Marketing Phenomena and Improving marketing Decision Making, Springer.
Train, K.E. (2009), Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation, Cambridge University Press. 1st edition is available here: http://elsa.berkeley.edu/books/train1201.pdf.
Verboven, F. (1996), International Price Discrimination in the European Car Market. RAND Journal of Economics, 27(2), 240–268.
Wooldridge, J.M. (2008), Introductory Econometrics, South-Western Cengage Learning.

Exam:
30% of the grade base on a written assignment of 5 pages about estimating price elasticities and promotion effects on the basis of store-level scanner using the econometric knowledge from this class that must be submitted after the last class. 70% of the grade base on 4 special work performances of 5 pages each that must be submitted during the semester.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:15pm to 01:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms’ objectives and marketing activities. In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms’ objectives. In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data. Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Literature: will be announced in class
Exam: written assignment

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 12:15pm at HU, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22
Description:

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms’ objectives and marketing activities. In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms’ objectives. In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data. Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Literature:


1. Anderson, S.P., de Palma A. and Thisse, J.-F. (1992), Discrete Choice Theory of Product Differentiation, The MIT Press.
2. Cody, R.P. and Smith, J.K. (2006), Applied Statistics and the SAS® Programming Language, Pearson.
3. Dubin, J. A. (1998), Studies in Consumer Demand – Econometric Methods Applied to Market Data, Kluwer Academic Publishers Group.
4. Franses, P.H. and Paap, R. (2010), Quantitative Models in Marketing Research, Cambridge University Press.
5. Hanssens, D.M., Parsons, L.J. and Schultz, R.L. (2003), Market Response Models: Econometric and Time Series Analysis, Kluwer Academic Publishers Group.
6. Train, K.E. (2009), Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation, Cambridge University Press. 1st edition is available here: http://elsa.berkeley.edu/books/train1201.pdf.
7. Verboven, F. (1996), International Price Discrimination in the European Car Market. RAND Journal of Economics, 27(2), 240–268.
8. Wooldridge, J.M. (2008), Introductory Econometrics, South-Western Cengage Learning.

Exam:
 4 non-graded Special Work Performances plus Graded written Assignment

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA 1, room 22
Description:

Wednesday 10.00 am ­ 12:00 pm
and Thursday 10:00 am ­ 12:00 pm, or 14:00 pm ­ 16:00 pm

Venue: Wednesday SPA 1, room 22; Thursday SPA 1, room 22 and room 23 (afternoon)

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms objectives and marketing activities.In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms objectives.In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and
market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data. Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Literature:

1. Anderson, S.P., de Palma A. and Thisse, J.-F. (1992), Discrete
Choice Theory of Product Differentiation, The MIT Press.

2. Cody, R.P. and Smith, J.K. (2006), Applied Statistics and the SAS®
Programming Language, Pearson.

3. Dubin, J. A. (1998), Studies in Consumer Demand ­ Econometric
Methods Applied to Market Data, Kluwer Academic Publishers Group.

4. Franses, P.H. and Paap, R. (2010), Quantitative Models in Marketing
Research, Cambridge University Press.

5. Hanssens, D.M., Parsons, L.J. and Schultz, R.L. (2003), Market
Response Models: Econometric and Time Series Analysis, Kluwer Academic
Publishers Group.

6. Train, K.E. (2009), Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation,
Cambridge University Press. 1st edition is available here:
http://elsa.berkeley.edu/books/train1201.pdf.

7. Wooldridge, J.M. (2008), Introductory Econometrics, South-Western
Cengage Learning.

Exam: Weekly, biweekly or monthly Assignments 70%,
Take-home case work 30%

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 220
Thursday, 10:15am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 220
Description:

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms’ objectives and marketing activities. In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms’ objectives. In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data.

Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Literature:
There is no assigned (must buy) textbook for the course.

Exam: weekly or biweekly assignment AND take-home case work.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at SPA1, R21b
Description:

This course is designed for students and researchers who want to develop professional skills in modern quantitative finance. It is offered to interested students who have had some experience with probability, statistics and software applications but have not had advanced courses in mathematical finance. Although the course assumes only a modest background it moves quickly between different fields of applications and in the end, the participant can expect to have theoretical and computational tools that are deep enough and rich enough to be relied on throughout
future professional careers. The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of value at risk, option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree construction will be discussed in detail. Modern financial engineering techniques such as the Implied volatility (IV) models or State Pricing Densities estimation will be also discussed as approaches to resolve a shortcoming of the BS model.

Literature: Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p).

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21b
Description:

The course Advanced Methods in Quantitative Finance aims to develop and equip students with professional skills in modern quantitative finance. The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of value at risk, option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, fundamentals of credit risk will be studied; rating migrations will be studied. Black‐Scholes (BS) Option model is presented leading to the analytic solution for the BS Option price. Numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree construction are discussed in detail. Modern financial engineering techniques such as the Implied volatility (IV) models or State Pricing Densities estimation will be also discussed as approaches to resolve a shortcoming of the BS model.

Exam:
Oral exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA 1 , 21b
Description:

This course is designed for students and researchers who want to develop professional skills in modern quantitative finance. It is offered to interested students who have had some experience with probability, statistics and software applications but have not had advanced courses in mathematical finance. Although the course assumes only a modest background it moves quickly between different fields of applications and in the end, the participant can expect to have theoretical and computational tools that are deep enough and rich enough to be relied on throughout future professional careers. The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of value at risk, option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree construction will be discussed in detail. Modern financial engineering techniques such as the Implied volatility (IV) models or State Pricing Densities estimation will be also discussed as approaches to resolve a shortcoming of the BS model.

Literature: Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied 
Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 
978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)

Exam: Oral

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21b
Description:

This course is designed for students and researchers who want to develop professional skills in modern quantitative finance. It is offered to interested students who have had some experience with probability, statistics and software applications but have not had advanced courses in mathematical finance. Although the course assumes only a modest background it moves quickly between different fields of applications and in the end, the participant can expect to have theoretical and computational tools that are deep enough and rich enough to be relied on throughout future professional careers. The compulsory textbook is readable for the graduate student in financial engineering as well as for the inexperienced newcomer to quantitative finance who wants to get a grip on modern statistical tools in financial data analysis. The experienced reader with a bright knowledge of mathematical finance will probably skip some sections but will hopefully enjoy the various computational tools of the presented techniques. A graduate student might think that some of the econometric techniques are well known. The mathematics of risk management and volatility dynamics will certainly introduce him into the rich realm of quantitative financial data analysis. The computer inexperienced user of this course is softly introduced into the interactive course concept and will certainly enjoy the various practical examples. The textbook is an e-book which is designed as an interactive document: a stream of text and information with various hints and links to additional tools and features. The course "Advanced Methods in Quantitative Finance" consists of four parts: Preliminaries, Value at Risk, Credit Risk and Implied Volatility. The first part of the course is a quick refresher of the most important concepts needed for this course. In the second part we treat the Approximation of the Value at Risk in conditional Gaussian Models, show how the VaR can be calculated using copulae and we discuss techniques of risk assessment beyond VaR. We then quantify the risk of yield spread changes via historical simulations. The third part deals with an analysis of rating migration probabilities. The forth part is devoted to the analysis of implied volatilities and their dynamics. We start with an analysis of the implied volatility surface and show how common PCA can be applied to model the dynamics of the surface. In the next two chapters we estimate the risk neutral state price density from observed option prices and the corresponding implied volatilities. We then calculate implied binomial trees to estimate the SPD, and present a method based on a local polynomial estimation of the implied volatility and its derivatives. The proposed methods are used to develop trading strategies based on the comparison of the historical SPD and the one implied by option prices.

Literature:
www.quantlet.de

Exam: Oral Exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
04:15pm to 05:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 203
Tuesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 125
Description:

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start by a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is at center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Literature:
Galí, Jordi (2008): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle, Princeton University Press.
Further literature: see Moodle

Exam:
Written exam

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:15pm at SPA1, 220
Description:

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start by a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is at center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Written exam (90 minutes)

Literature:
Galí, Jordi (2008): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle, Princeton University Press.

More documents will be made available on Moodle.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:00pm at SPA1, R201
Description:

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start by a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is at center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New
Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial
frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Literature:
Galí, Jordi (2008): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle,
Princeton University Press. More documents will be made available on moodle.

Exam: 90 minutes

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, SPA1, Room 22
Description:

How to use dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models for positive and normative analysis.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start by a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is at center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Literature:
Galí, Jordi (2008): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle, Princeton University Press.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
09:00am to 06:00pm
at FU, exact location tba
Description:

This course focuses on quantitative empirical archival accounting research, covering theoretical, methodological and technical aspects of this research program. The course concentrates on financial accounting issues but also touches on some auditing topics. After this course, participants should

  • have a clear understanding about the theoretical foundations of positive and capital market-based financial accounting research,
  • understand the methodological approaches to and common pitfalls of empirical archival research designs,
  • have acquired information about how to execute empirical archival studies, including the usability and inter-operability of different data sources,
  • have become familiar with a collaborative data science workflow using R/Stata and Github,
  • and, based on their own research proposal, have received constructive feedback on how to design and execute a viable study in the area of quantitative empirical financial accounting research.

Literature:
See syllabus

Exam:
Research Proposal and its presentation (see syllabus for details)

Interested students have to apply to participate by August 13 by sending an email to gassen@wiwi.hu-berlin.de.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Wednesday,
12:15pm to 01:45pm
at Spandauer Straße 1, room 21b
Description:

Basic concepts, models with fixed and random effects, specification tests, simultaneous equations and dynamic models, models for qualitative dependent variables.

Literature:
Badi H. Baltagi: Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley & Sons, 2005
Further literature will be announced in the course.

Time and venue:
Mondays, 14-16, Spandauer Straße 1, room 23 (Starting on April 15. Individual dates are held in room 25 (PC-Pool).)
Wednesdays, 12-14, Spandauer Straße 1, room 21b (Starting on April 10.)

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA1, R23
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at SPA1, R 21a / 025
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.
In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.
Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Empirical Tutorials take place at room 025 (Tue)
Exam: written exam (90 min), two exam dates
Credits (ECTS): 9.0

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Spandauer Straße 1, room 23
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Spandauer Straße 1, room 203; Empirical Tutorials take place at R025 (Thu)
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.
In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam: written exam (90 min), two exam dates

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 01:30pm at HU, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.
In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam: written exam (90 min)

Weekdays/Times: Mon, 10:00-12:00, room 23
Thu, 12:00-14:00, room 25

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analyzing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.

In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam: written exam (90 min).

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analyzing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.

In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam: written exam (90 min).

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

Covers the economic foundations of accounting research. Based on information economics and mechanism design. Topics include use of accounting information in contracting problems, accounting and regulation, accounting-based security valuation and performance evaluation.

Literature:
None. For reading list of current papers, refer to the full syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, room 106
Tuesday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, K 006b PC-Pool 2
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 11:00am at Garystr. 21, Dahlem
Description:

The aim of applied microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on the basis of micro data (cross-section and panel data) of individuals, households, and firms. The standard linear regression model is generally not applicable to micro data due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The most frequently applied microeconomic methods are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using real-world micro data and the software package STATA.

Literature: A. C. Cameron and P. K. Trivedi, Microeconometrics. Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press, 2005
Time(s): 2-4 weekly lectures, biweekly tutorial
Exam (written?): written 2 hours final exam, term paper

- PLEASE SEE THE LINK FOR THE CURRENT TIME SCHEDULE OF THE COURSE -

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr.
Description:

The aim of applied microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on the basis of micro data (cross-section and panel data) of individuals, households, and firms.
The standard linear regression model is generally not applicable to micro data due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The empirical methods most frequently applied in empirical microeconomics are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using micro data and the software package STATA.

Please see the attached link for further information and dates of the tutorial (Tuesday, 12pm - 2pm):
http://www.fu-berlin.de/vv/de/modul?id=71958&sm=314889

Literature:
M. Verbeek, A Guide to Modern Econometrics (4 ed.), Wiley, 2012.
A. C. Cameron and P. K. Trivedi, Microeconometrics. Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press, 2005
W. H. Greene, Econometric Analysis (7 ed.), Pearson, 2012, Chapters 11 and 17-19.
J. M. Wooldridge, Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, MIT Press, 2 ed. 2010
Selected journal articles on empirical applications.

Exam: Written final exam; research paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 02:30pm at FU Berlin, Garystr.
Description:

The aim of applied microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on the basis of micro data (cross-section and panel data) of individuals, households, and firms. The standard linear regression model is generally not applicable to micro data due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The empirical methods most frequently applied in empirical microeconomics are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using real-world micro data and the software package STATA.

Time(s): 2:30 - 4 pm (lectures); 8:30 - 10:00 am (tutorials)

Literature:
M. Verbeek, A Guide to Modern Econometrics (4 ed.), Wiley, 2012.
A. C. Cameron and P. K. Trivedi, Microeconometrics. Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press, 2005
W. H. Greene, Econometric Analysis (7 ed.), Pearson, 2012, Chapters 11 and 17-19.
J. M. Wooldridge, Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, MIT Press, 2 ed. 2010
Selected journal articles on empirical applications.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
03:00pm to 06:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr.
Description:

The aim of applied microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on the basis of micro data (cross-section and panel data) of individuals, households, and firms. The standard linear regression model is generally not applicable to micro data due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The empirical methods most frequently applied in empirical microeconomics are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using real-world micro data and the software package STATA.

Literature:

M. Verbeek, A Guide to Modern Econometrics (4 ed.), Wiley, 2012.

A. C. Cameron and P. K. Trivedi, Microeconometrics. Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press, 2005

W. H. Greene, Econometric Analysis (7 ed.), Pearson, 2012, Chapters 11 and 17-19.

J. M. Wooldridge, Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, MIT Press, 2 ed. 2010

Selected journal articles on empirical applications.

Exam: Written final exam; research paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
03:00pm to 06:00pm
at FU Berlin, Dahlem, Garystr. 21, Room 106
Description:

The aim of microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on the basis of micro data (crosssection and panel data) of individuals, households, and firms. The standard linear regression model is generally not applicable to micro data due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The empirical methods most frequently applied in empirical microeconomics are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using real-world microdata and the software package STATA.

Literature:
A. C. Cameron and P. K. Trivedi, Microeconometrics. Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press, 2005
W. H. Greene, Econometric Analysis (7 ed.), Pearson, 2012, Chapters 11 and 17-19.
J. M. Wooldridge, Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, MIT Press, 2 ed. 2010

Exam:
final exam, research paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
03:15pm to 05:45pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, Room 104
Description:

The aim of microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on the basis of micro data (crosssection and panel data) of individuals, households, and firms. The standard linear regression model is generally not applicable to micro data due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The empirical methods most frequently applied in empirical microeconomics are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using real-world microdata and the software package STATA.

Literature:
A. C. Cameron and P. K. Trivedi, Microeconometrics. Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press, 2005
W. H. Greene, Econometric Analysis (7 ed.), Pearson, 2012, Chapters 11 and 17-19.
J. M. Wooldridge, Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, MIT Press, 2 ed. 2010

The classes will be held by Kai-Uwe Müller (DIW).

Exam: Final exam and small empirical paper with presentation.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at Garystr. 21, 14195 Berlin-Dahlem, HS 106
Description:

The aim of applied microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on  the basis of micro data  (cross-section and panel data) of  individuals, households, and firms.  The standard linear regression  model is generally not applicable to micro data  due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of  dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The empirical methods most  frequently applied in empirical microeconomics are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using real-world micro data and the software package STATA

Lectures 10:15-11:45, Garystr. 21 HS 101
Computer Exercises biweekly 08:30-10:00, K 006a PC Pool 1

Literature: M. Verbeek, A Guide to Modern Econometrics (4 ed.), Wiley, 2012. A. C. Cameron and P. K. Trivedi, Microeconometrics. Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press, 2005 W. H. Greene, Econometric Analysis (7 ed.), Pearson, 2012, Chapters 11 and 17-19. J. M. Wooldridge, Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, MIT Press, 2 ed. 2010 Selected journal articles on empirical applications. Exam: Written final exam; research paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course covers: single unit auctions (private and common values) - role of risk aversion optimal auctions - affiliation - multi-unit auctions - sequential auctions -- applications. The course has three main objectives:
(i) Teach the mathematical methods of solving auction games and designing markets;
(ii) Review the main fields of the auctions literature and frontiers of current research;
(iii) Discuss practical experience (spectrum auctions, energy markets, take-over bidding, etc.).

Literature:
Vijai Krishna. Auction Theory. Academic Press 2002 and others

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

Bargaining is central to the working of the economy. This course is designed to introduce the major insights gained by the bargaining theory to students who will later develop, interpret or apply bargaining models in different fields within economics.

Literature:
Muthoo, A. (1999). Bargaining theory with applications. Cambridge Univ. Press
Osborne, M. J. & A. Rubinstein (1990). Bargaining and markets. Academic Press, San Diego and others

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at WZB Berlin, Room D112/113
Description:

In this reading group, we will discuss current research in behavioral and experimental economics. We will focus on four topics: Experimental Methodology, Belief formation and elicitation, Social Preferences, and Behavioral Economics Applications. Each of the topics will be discussed in 3-4 weeks. Participants are expected to read carefully one paper per week. Additionally, participants have to lead the discussion of an article 1-2 times per semester (depending on the number of participants). Discussants should not shy away from discussing details of the experimental design, econometric technique or modeling assumptions of a paper. By joining the reading group, students can commit to read and discuss interesting research each week and benefit from a cooperative environment where we help each other to understand details and to identify the gist of a paper.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 08:00am at SPA1, R23
Description:

Content of the course:

1. False perceptions:
narrow bracketing and other framing effect
probability updating errors
projection bias and time inconsistency
unawareness
exponential growth bias and other prediction errors
financial illiteracy

2. Preference anomalies:
probability weighting and prospect theory
present-biased preferences
ambiguity aversion

3. Interaction and markets:
markets with boundly rational agents
level-k and related models
course reasoning in markets

- A component of the seminar is an ungraded presentation.
- Organizational matters: Max. 20 participants.
- Please register with Professor Weizsäcker (weizsaecker@hu-berlin.de) until April 3, 2017.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Friday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Description:

Prerequisite:

To attend this class students must have completed the core micro courses (Microeconomics 1 and 2).

This course presents psychological and experimental research in economics indicating departures from perfect rationality, self interest, and other classical assumptions of economics. To do so, a variety of empirical results are discussed. The course, however, focuses on different ways of how these departures from the standard assumptions can be formally modeled. It also discusses the implications of these formal behavioral models for positive and normative predictions in different institutional settings. The course has three aims: (i) familiarizing students with the lively debate in experimental and behavioral economics; (ii) providing them with the methodological competence necessary to understand and judge original empirical research; (iii) provide formal tools for using so-called behavioral approaches in other areas of economics.

Literature:

There is no standard textbook in behavioral economics and the course is not based on a given textbook. Instead, students are expected to read original papers. Nevertheless, a good starting point is: Kahneman, Daniel and Amos Tversky. Choices, Values and Frames, New York: Russell Sage Foundation; Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Details of grading / exams depend on the number of participants and will be discussed in the first session.

The course will take place on the following dates: 16.10., 18.10., 06.11., 08.11., 20.11., 22.11., 27.11., 29.11., 04.12., 06.12., 11.12., 13.12., 18.12., 20.12.
Room number 00.21, ESMT Learning Center (room numbers for sessions on 20.11. and 22.11. to be confirmed)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT (the room number will be displayed on the info screen, foyer Schlossplatz entrance)
Description:

Prerequisite:

To attend this class students must have completed the core micro courses (Microeconomics 1 and 2).

This course presents psychological and experimental research in economics indicating departures from perfect rationality, self interest, and other classical assumptions of economics. To do so, a variety of empirical results are discussed. The course, however, focuses on different ways of how these departures from the standard assumptions can be formally modelled. It also discusses the implications of these formal behavioral model for positive and normative predictions in different institutional settings. The course has three aims: (i) familarizing students with the lively debate in experimental and behavioral economics; (ii) providing them with the methodological competence necessary to understand and judge original emprical research; (iii) provide formal tools for using so-called behavioral approaches in other areas of economics.

Literature:

There is no standard textbook in behavioral economics and the course is not based on a given textbook. Instead, students are expected to read original papers. Nevertheless, a good starting point is: Kahneman, Daniel and Amos Tversky. Choices, Values and Frames, New York: Russell Sage Foundation; Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Details of grading / exams depend on the number of participants and will be dicussed in the first session.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

To attend this class students must have completed the core micro courses (Microeconomics 1 and 2).

This course presents psychological and experimental research in economics indicating departures from perfect rationality, self interest, and other classical assumptions of economics. To do so, a variety of empirical results are discussed. The course, however, focuses on different ways of how these departures from the standard assumptions can be formally modelled. It also discusses the implications of these formal behavioral model for positive and normative predictions in different institutional settings. The course has three aims: (i) familarizing students with the lively debate in experimental and behavioral economics; (ii) providing them with the methodological competence necessary to understand and judge original emprical research; (iii) provide formal tools for using so-called behavioral approaches in other areas of economics.

Literature:

There is no standard textbook in behavioral economics and the course is not based on a given textbook. Instead, students are expected to read original papers. Nevertheless, a good starting point is: Kahneman, Daniel and Amos Tversky. Choices, Values and Frames, New York: Russell Sage Foundation; Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT (various rooms)
Description:

Prerequisite:

To attend this class students must have completed the core micro courses (Microeconomics 1 and 2).

 

This course presents psychological and experimental research in economics indicating departures from perfect rationality, self interest, and other classical assumptions of economics. To do so, a variety of empirical results are discussed. The course, however, focuses on different ways of how these departures from the standard assumptions can be formally modelled. It also discusses the implications of these formal behavioral model for positive and normative predictions in different institutional settings. The course has three aims: (i) familarizing students with the lively debate in experimental and behavioral economics; (ii) providing them with the methodological competence necessary to understand and judge original emprical research; (iii) provide formal tools for using so-called behavioral approaches in other areas of economics.

 

Literature:

There is no standard textbook in behavioral economics and the course is not based on a given textbook. Instead, students are expected to read original papers. Nevertheless, a good starting point is: Kahneman, Daniel and Amos Tversky. Choices, Values and Frames, New York: Russell Sage Foundation; Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 03:00pm at SPA1, room 22
Description:

Berlin Behavioral Economics Colloquium and Seminar
The Berlin Behavioral Economics Colloquium and Seminar are a joint effort between DIW, WZB, HU Berlin and TU Berlin (in cooperation with CRC TRR 190) with the aim of fostering the exchange between active researchers in the areas of behavioral and experimental economics.
The 2018 summer semester series will be held at Humboldt University, Spandauer Str. 1, 10178 Berlin, room 22, on Thursdays from 3:00-4:15 pm and 4:45-6:00 pm unless otherwise stated.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The WZB reading group takes places each Monday from 4pm-5 pm.

Exam: Two presentations and/or discussions
Location: to be announced

Please contact Philipp Albert (philipp.albert@wzb.eu), if you are interested in joining the reading group.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday,
02:00pm to 05:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Schmoller Room
Monday,
09:00am to 12:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Schmoller Room
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
02:00pm to 03:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Schmoller R1.2.026
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at SPA1, R23
Description:

The Economic Risk Seminar is one of three regular research seminars hosted by the Sonderforschungsbereich 649. The SFB-649 facilitates an exchange between national and international scientists. The Economic Risk Seminar covers a wide spectrum of topics with some focus on the quantitative analysis of financial markets. During semester the seminar takes place regularly on Mondays between 2 and 4pm in room 23 at the School of Business and Economics of the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin at Spandauer Straße 1. The talks are held in English or German.

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

The Economic Risk Seminar is one of three regular research seminars hosted by the Sonderforschungsbereich 649. The SFB-649 facilitates an exchange between national and international scientists. The Economic Risk Seminar covers a wide spectrum of topics with some focus on the quantitative analysis of financial markets. During semester the seminar takes place regularly on Mondays between 2 and 4pm in room 23 at the School of Business and Economics of the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin at Spandauer Straße 1. The talks are held in English or German.

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

This course is the Modul Ökonomische Theorie politischer Entscheidungen of the Master of Science in Public Economics and provides an introduction to the economic analysis of public …nances and public policy more generally. It considers how economic approaches can help to analyse and evaluate political decision-making processes. It starts with a brief introduction to social choice theory, covering Arrow's impossibility theorem and the Gibbard Satterthwaite theorem. The second part of the course is devoted to the tools of modern political economics. The third and longest part is devoted to applications. The course follows the textbook by Persson and Tabellini (2000), with additions from the recent literature.

Literature:
Acemoglu D 2005. Constitutions, Politics, and Economics: A Review Essay on Persson and Tabellinis The Economic Effects of Constitutions. Journal of Economic Literature, Volume 43, Number 4, pp. 1025-1048(24)
Acemoglu D, Robinson JA. 2005. Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Cambridge University Press.
Barbera S 2010. Strategy-Proof Social Choice. Mimeo.
Barbera S, Jackson M.O. 2006. On the Weights of Nations: Assigning Vot- ing Weights in a Heterogeneous Union. Journal of Political Economy, vol. 114, no. 2.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstr. 1, Room 204
Description:

The objective of this course is that students are able to (i) understand and critically evaluate seminal research in accounting and (ii) use these skills to develop an exposé for a research project that has the potential to contribute to extant literature.
The course entails group discussions of seminal papers that identify fundamental questions in accounting research and that use innovative methods to address such questions.

Literature:
Relevant literature will be provided during the term.

Exam:
Grades will be based on (i) active participation during the reading group sessions and (ii) an exposé for a research project.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 2.04
Description:

The course aims at equipping you with the necessary background and skill-set to read, comprehend and evaluate current empirical work in the area of financial accounting research. It is aimed at second year PhD students and requires a sound background in economics and microeconometrics. In addition, students should have a general understanding of the institutions of capital markets in general and financial accounting in particular.

Teaching is organized in topical sessions. For each session, one participant is expected to take the lead, suggesting papers to discuss two weeks in advance and structure the discussion.

Literature:
tba

Exam:
Students interested in obtaining 6 ECTS credits from this course are requested to hand in the following:

  • Two topic summaries (1,500 words not including references), handed in two weeks after the according class. These summaries should not be confined to the literature discussed in class and should include a discussion of potential avenues of future research.
  • A proposal for a potential research project (1,500 words not including references). This research project will be presented and discussed in the last session of the class. Ideally, this could be a kick-start for a part of your PhD work.

Grading will depend on the assignments (see above) and on class participation. All four components are given equal weights for the final grade.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 204
Description:

The course aims at equipping you with the necessary background and skill-set to read, comprehend and evaluate current empirical work in the area of financial accounting research. It is aimed at second year PhD students and requires a sound background in economics and microeconometrics. In addition, students should have a general understanding of the institutions of capital markets in general and financial accounting in particular.

Teaching is organized in topical sessions. For each session, one participant is expected to take the lead, suggesting papers to discuss two weeks in advance and structure the discussion.

Dates:
2018: Oct 26, Nov 16, Dec 7
2019: Jan 11, Feb 1

Literature:
tba

Exam:
Students interested in obtaining 6 ECTS credits from this course are requested to hand in the following:

  • Two topic summaries (1,500 words not including references), handed in two weeks after the according class. These summaries should not be confined to the literature discussed in class and should include a discussion of potential avenues of future research.
  • A proposal for a potential research project (1,500 words not including references). This research project will be presented and discussed in the last session of the class. Ideally, this could be a kick-start for a part of your PhD work.

Grading will depend on the assignments (see above) and on class participation. All four components are given equal weights for the final grade.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 02:00pm at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstr. 1, Room 2.04
Description:

The course aims at equipping you with the necessary background and skill-set to read, comprehend and evaluate empirical work in the area of financial accounting research. It is aimed at second year PhD-students and requires a sound background in economics
and microeconomics. In addition, students should have a general understanding of the institutions of capital markets in general and financial accounting in particular. Master students are invited to attend but it is not possible to obtain credits. If you are
interested in attending please contact Joachim Gassen (gassen@wiwi.hu-berlin.de).

Credits:
0.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday (All day) at DIW, Gustav SCHMOLLER room (1.2.026)
Friday (All day) at DIW, Gustav SCHMOLLER room (1.2.026)
Description:

This workshop of Prof. Eizenberg will be completed in two sessions, during the 28. and 29. May 2015.
The exact time is yet to be announced.

Credits:
2.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 22
Description:

This course provides an overview on the economic analysis of labor markets. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, human capital, education and training, changes in the wages structure and inequality, biased technological change and returns to skills, organizational change and skill demand, the closing gender gap. The introduction of topics will be on textbook level, but the focus will be on the discussion of empirical implementation strategies used in recent publications.

Acquaintance of intermediate microeconomics or labor economics and econometrics is highly recommended.

Literature:
R. Ehrenberg and R. Smith, 2003, Modern Labor Economics,
P. Cahuc and A. Zylberberg, 2004, Labor Economics,
and selected journal articles

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at SPA1, R22
Description:

Further description will follow.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at SPA1, R22
Description:

This course provides an overview on the economic analysis of labor markets. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, human capital, education and training, changes in the wages structure and inequality, biased technological change and returns to skills, organizational change and skill demand, the closing gender gap. The introduction of topics will be on textbook level, but the focus will be on the discussion of empirical implementation strategies used in recent publications.

Acquaintance of intermediate microeconomics or labor economics and econometrics is highly recommended.

Literature:
R. Ehrenberg and R. Smith, 2003, Modern Labor Economics;
P. Cahuc and A. Zylberberg, 2004, Labor Economics;
+ selected journal articles

Exam: written exam

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

This course provides an overview on the economic analysis of labor markets. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, human capital, education and training, changes in the wages structure and inequality, biased technological change and returns to skills, organizational change and skill demand, the closing gender gap. The introduction of topics will be on textbook level, but the focus will be on the discussion of empirical implementation strategies used in recent publications.

Literature: tba

Exam: Yes, 2 dates

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course in labor economics is appropriate for Master and Ph.D. students in Economics and other students with preparation in microeconomic theory and econometrics. The course teaches core topics in the field of labor economics as well as empirical methods for applied microeconomic analysis.

Literature:
Wooldridge, Jeffrey, 2002, Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Stock, James, and Mark Watson, 2003, Introduction to Econometrics, Addison-Wesley.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday,
02:00pm to 06:00pm
at SPA1, R22
Description:

This course provides an overview on the economic analysis of labor markets. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, human capital, education and training, changes in the wages structure and inequality, biased technological change and returns to skills, organizational change and skill demand, the closing gender gap. The introduction of topics will be on textbook level, but the focus will be on the discussion of empirical implementation strategies used in recent publications. Acquaintance of intermediate microeconomics or labor economics (ideally Prof. Burda’s course in labor economics) and econometrics is highly recommended.

 

Literature:

R. Ehrenberg and R. Smith, 2003, Modern Labor Economics P. Cahuc and A. Zylberberg, 2004, Labor Economics selected journal articles

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
Description:

This course aims at equipping students with the skill-set to design and conduct empirical studies based on observational (archival) data in the fields of accounting and finance. After successful completion of the course students should

• understand the fundamentals and common pitfalls of quasi-experimental research design,
• be familiar with matching mechanisms, instrumental variable and panel data approaches which help with causal inference,
• be aware of limitations of these research designs,
• and, using the statistical software packages STATA and/or SAS, have gathered experiences in designing and conducting large-scale research projects.

Course format
The course consists of a combination of lectures, practical exercises, and student presentations of homework assignments. Lectures will be based on the relevant literature and on seminal as well as recent journal articles. Participants are responsible for reading the assigned materials before class and to hand in the homework assignments on time. The homework assignments will be group-based.

Literature:
Angrist, Joshua D. and Jörn-Steffen Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion, Princeton University Press.
Morgan. Stephen L. and Christopher Winship (2007): Counterfactuals and Causal Inference: Methods and Principles for Social Research, Cambridge University Press.
Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, The MIT Press.

Exam: group homework and written exam (one exam date: 08.07.13)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21b
Description:

This course aims at equipping students with the skill-set to design and conduct empirical studies based on observational (archival) data in the fields of accounting and finance. After successful completion of the course students should

  • understand the fundamentals and common pitfalls of quasi-experimental research design,
  • be familiar with matching mechanisms, instrumental variable and panel data approaches which help with causal inference,
  • be aware of limitations of these research designs,
  • and, using the statistical software packages STATA and/or SAS, have gathered experiences
in designing and conducting large-scale research projects.

The course consists of a combination of lectures, practical exercises, and student presentations of homework assignments. Lectures will be based on the relevant literature and on seminal as well as recent journal articles. Participants are responsible for reading the assigned materials before class and to hand in the homework assignments on time. The homework assignments will be group-based.

Literature:
Angrist, Joshua D. and Jörn-Steffen Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion, Princeton University Press.
Morgan. Stephen L. and Christopher Winship (2007): Counterfactuals and Causal Inference: Methods and Principles for Social Research, Cambridge University Press.
Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, The MIT Press.

Exam:
The final grade will be based on the assignments (40 % combined) and on the written exam (60 %). Students need to achieve satisfactory grades in all assignments and the exam to pass the course.
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course aims at equipping students with the skill-set to design and conduct empirical studies based on observational (archival) data in the fields of accounting and finance. After successful completion of the course students should

• understand the fundamentals and common pitfalls of quasi-experimental research design,
• be familiar with matching mechanisms, instrumental variable and panel data approaches which help with causal inference,
• be aware of limitations of these research designs,
• and, using the statistical software packages STATA and/or SAS, have gathered experiences in designing and conducting large-scale research projects.

Course format
The course consists of a combination of lectures, practical exercises, and student presentations of homework assignments. Lectures will be based on the relevant literature and on seminal as well as recent journal articles. Participants are responsible for reading the assigned materials before class and to hand in the homework assignments on time. The homework assignments will be group-based.

Literature:
Angrist, Joshua D. and Jörn-Steffen Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion, Princeton University Press.
Morgan. Stephen L. and Christopher Winship (2007): Counterfactuals and Causal Inference: Methods and Principles for Social Research, Cambridge University Press.
Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, The MIT Press.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 104
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. The course covers alternative empirical approaches and important topics in empirical public economics including non-structural (“treatment effects” estimation) and structural estimation methodologies as well as the empirical ex-ante evaluation of tax-benefit reforms. Lectures on empirical methods are supplemented by classes on the application of the various methods using STATA. The course assumes knowledge of applied microeconometrics.

Literature:
Blundell, R., M. Costa-Dias (2009): Alternative approaches to evaluation in empirical microeconomics. Journal of Human Resources 44, 565–640.
Aaberge, R., U. Columbino (2018): Structural labour supply models and microsimulation. IZA DP No. 11562.

Time and venue:
Lectures: Wednesdays, 14:00-16:00, FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 104
Tutorials: Tuesdays, 10:00-12:00, FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2 or Wednesdays, 10:00-12:00, FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2

Exam:
2 hours final exam; research paper on empirical topic in public/labour economics (may be part of the PhD thesis)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at Freie Universität, Garystr. 21, lecture halle 104
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Freie Universität, Garystr. 21, K 006a PC Pool 1
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. The course covers alternative empirical approaches and important topics in empirical public economics including non-structural (“treatment effects” estimation) and structural estimation methodologies as well as the empirical ex-ante evaluation of tax-benefit reforms. Lectures on empirical methods are supplemented by classes on the application of the various methods using STATA. The course assumes knowledge of applied microeconometrics.

Literature:
Blundell, R., M. Costa-Dias (2009): Alternative approaches to evaluation in empirical microeconomics. Journal of Human Resources 44, 565–640.
Aaberge, R., U. Columbino (2018): Structural labour supply models and microsimulation. IZA DP No. 11562.

Exam:
2 hours final exam; research paper on empirical topic in public/labour economics (may be part of the PhD thesis)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Freie Universität, HS 104a (tba)
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. The course covers alternative empirical approaches and important topics in empirical public economics. Empirical approaches include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies.

Topics include: The measurement of the distribution effects of taxes and transfers, treatment effects estimation of policy reforms, structural estimation of labor supply models with taxes, and the empirical ex-ante evaluation of tax-benefit reforms. The course assumes knowledge of applied microeconometrics.

Literature: Journal articles
Exam (written?): 2 hours final exam; term paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:30pm to 05:00pm
at Dep. Economics, Garystr. 21, Berlin-Dahlem
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. The course covers alternative empirical approaches and important topics in empirical public economics. Empirical approaches include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies. Topics include: distributional analysis and the measurement of inequality; treatment effects estimation of government programs; structural estimation of labor supply models and the effects of personal income taxation; the empirical ex-ante evaluation of tax-benefit reforms. The course assumes some knowledge of applied microeconometrics.

Exam: one written final exam; one term paper, bonus points for paper presentation

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
03:00pm to 05:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Hs 104 Hörsaal
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. Topics covered include: Effects of taxes and government transfers on labor supply and savings behavior of households; taxable income literature; welfare analysis of tax reforms; incentive and welfare effects of social insurance programs. Empirical approaches covered in the course include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies, such as “natural experiments”, treatment effects estimation, ex-ante policy evaluation and microsimulation.

Literature: Journal articles

Exam: Final exam; research paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. Topics covered include: Effects of taxes and government transfers on labor supply and savings behavior of households; taxable income literature; welfare analysis of tax reforms; incentive and welfare effects of social insurance programs. Empirical approaches covered in the course include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies, such as “natural experiments”, treatment effects estimation, ex-ante policy evaluation and microsimulation.

Literature: Journal articles

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
03:15pm to 05:45pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, ro0m tba.
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. Topics covered include: Effects of taxes and government transfers on labor supply and savings behavior of households; taxable income literature; welfare analysis of tax reforms; incentive and welfare effects of social insurance programs. Empirical approaches covered in the course include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies, such as “natural experiments”, treatment effects estimation, ex-ante policy evaluation and microsimulation.

Literature: Journal articles

Exam: final exam; research paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
02:30pm to 05:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Room 105
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. Topics covered include: Effects of taxes and government transfers on labor supply, consumption and savings behavior of households; taxable income literature; welfare analysis of tax reforms; incentive and welfare effects of social insurance programs. Empirical approaches covered in the course include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies, such as “natural experiments”, treatment effects estimation, ex-ante policy evaluation and microsimulation. Doctoral students are expected to write a research paper on some topic in empirical public economics.

Literature:
Lecture notes and research papers.

Exam: 
Final exam (2 hours, 60 percent), research paper (40 percent).

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

This course presents nonparametric and semiparametric regression techniques and modern microeconometric methods for treatment effects estimation. The treatment focuses on the potential outcome approach, and students learn various methods to account for selection based on observables (regression, matching, inverse probability weighting) and for selection based on unobservables (Heckman selection correction, difference-in-differences, panel regression, instrumental variable regression, regression discontinuity design). These methods are used for cross-section data and longitudinal data, both repeated crosssections and panel data. Students will familiarize themselves with applying the methods to real empirical data using Stata.
Please check the homepage of the chair of econometrics for the course syllabus and for the course material covered in the first lecture before the first lecture on 15 October 2019.

Literature:
AP: Angrist, J. D. and J.-S. Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics – An Empiricist’s Companion, Princeton University Press.
CT: Cameron, A. C. and P. K. Trivedi (2005): Microeconometrics – Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press.
GR: Greene, W. (2008): Econometric Analysis, 6th, International Edition, Prentice Hall.
HL: Härdle, W. and O. Linton (1994): “Applied Nonparametric Methods”, in: Handbook of Econometrics, Vol. 4, R. F. Engle and O. F. McFadden, (eds.), Elsevier Science.
PU: Pagan, A. and A. Ullah (1999): Nonparametric Econometrics, Cambridge University Press.
WO: Wooldridge, J. M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (see also: http://mitpress.mit.edu/Wooldridge-EconAnalysis).
Further references, particularly regarding the method of Quantile Regression and the application of the methods, will be given in the course.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
08:30am to 10:00am
at HU, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 23
Tuesday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at HU, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 23
Description:

This course presents nonparametric and semiparametric regression techniques and modern microeconometric methods for treatment effects estimation. The treatment focuses on the potential outcome approach, and students learn various methods to account for selection based on observables (regression, matching, inverse probability weighting) and for selection based on unobservables (Heckman selection correction, difference-in-differences, panel regression, instrumental variable regression, regression discontinuity design). These methods are used for cross-section data and longitudinal data, both repeated cross-sections and panel data. Students will familiarize themselves with applying the methods to real empirical data using Stata.

Literature:
Angrist, J. D. and J.-S. Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics – An Empiricist’s Companion, Princeton University Press.
Pagan, A. and A. Ullah (1999): Nonparametric Econometrics, Cambridge University Press
Wooldridge, J. M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Exam:
Written exam (to register for the exam, PhD students must present a research paper)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at SPA 1, 22
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at SPA1, 22
Description:

This course presents nonparametric and semiparametric regression techniques and modern microeconometric methods for treatment effects estimation. The treatment focuses on the potential outcome approach, and students learn various methods to account for selection based on observables (regression, matching, inverse probability weighting) and for selection based on unobservables (Heckman selection correction, difference-in-differences, panel regression, instrumental variable regression, regression discontinuity design). These methods are used for cross-section data and longitudinal data, both repeated cross-sections and panel data. Students will familiarize themselves with applying the methods to real empirical data using Stata.

Main References:

AP: Angrist, J. D. and J.-S. Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics – An Empiricist’s Companion, Princeton University Press.
CT: Cameron, A. C. and P. K. Trivedi (2005): Microeconometrics – Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press.
GR: Greene, W. (2008): Econometric Analysis, 6th ed., International Edition, Prentice Hall.
HL: Härdle, W. and O. Linton (1994): "Applied Nonparametric Methods", in: Handbook of Econometrics, Vol. 4, R. F. Engle und O. F. McFadden, (eds.), Elsevier Science.
PU: Pagan, A. and A. Ullah (1999): Nonparametric Econometrics, Cambridge University Press.
WO: Wooldridge, J. M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (see also: http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/econometric-analysis-cross-section-and-pan... ).

Further references, particularly regarding the method of Quantile Regression and the application of the methods, will be given in the course.

Exam: written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 08:00am at SPA1, R22
Description:

Lectures/Exercises:
Tue, 8-10, SPA 1, 22
Tue, 14-16, SPA 1, 22

This course presents nonparametric and semiparametric regression techniques and modern microeconometric methods for treatment effects estimation. The treatment focuses on the potential outcome approach, and students learn various methods to account for selection based on observables (regression, matching, inverse probability weighting) and for selection based on unobservables (Heckman selection correction, difference-in-differences, panel regression, instrumental variable regression, regression discontinuity design). These methods are used for cross-section data and longitudinal data, both repeated cross-sections and panel data. Students will familiarize themselves with applying the methods to real empirical data using Stata.

Main References:

AP: Angrist, J. D. and J.-S. Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics – An Empiricist’s Companion, Princeton University Press.
CT: Cameron, A. C. and P. K. Trivedi (2005): Microeconometrics – Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press.
GR: Greene, W. (2008): Econometric Analysis, 6th ed., International Edition, Prentice Hall.
HL: Härdle, W. and O. Linton (1994): "Applied Nonparametric Methods", in: Handbook of Econometrics, Vol. 4, R. F. Engle und O. F. McFadden, (eds.), Elsevier Science.
PU: Pagan, A. and A. Ullah (1999): Nonparametric Econometrics, Cambridge University Press.
WO: Wooldridge, J. M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (see also: http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/econometric-analysis-cross-section-and-pan... ).

Further references, particularly regarding the method of Quantile Regression and the application of the methods, will be given in the course.

Exam: written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 125
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22
Description:

The lecture will cover the most important aspects of the European economic development from the turn of the 19th century to the outbreak of the First World War. Topics include the Industrial Revolution, population growth and migration, international trade, the Gold Standard, as well as the economics of nationalism, colonialism and war. In the tutorial, we will discuss key texts and important concepts.

Literature:
Broadberry, S.; O’Rourke, K. (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.

Time and venue:
Lectures: Tuesdays, 14:00-16:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 125
Tutorials: Wesnesdays, 10:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 125
Description:

The lecture will cover the most important aspects of the European economic development from the turn of the 19th century to the outbreak of the First World War. Topics include the Industrial Revolution, population growth and migration, international trade, the Gold Standard, as well as the economics of nationalism, colonialism and war. In the tutorial, we will discuss key texts and important concepts.

Literature:
Broadberry, S.; O’Rourke, K. (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at SPA1, 125
Description:

Tutorial: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
Venue of tutorials: SPA1, 22

The course deals with the economic development of Europe from the beginning of the First World War up to the current situation from a historical perspective. Key topics include the economics of the two wars, European hyperinflations, the Great Depression, the bloc-wise economic integration in Western and Eastern Europe, the Golden Age of Growth, the economics of stagflation, global integration and global imbalances in a long-run perspective.

Literature: Stephen Broadberry, and Kevin H O'Rourke (eds) (2010) "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe" , Vol 2: 1870 to the Present, Cambridge.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 125
Wednesday,
12:15pm to 01:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 125
Description:

The course deals with the economic development of Europe from the beginning of the First World War up to the current situation from a historical perspective. Key topics include the economics of the two wars, European hyperinflations, the great depression, the bloc-wise economic integration in Western and Eastern Europe, the Golden Age of Growth, the economics of stagflation, global integration and global imbalances in a long-run perspective.

Literature:
Stephen Broadberry, and Kevin H O'Rourke (eds) (2010) "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe" , Vol 2: 1870 to the Present, Cambridge.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 202
Thursday,
06:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 202
Description:

Processes of real economic integration via growth convergence, trade, factor mobility and fiscal transfers: theoretical and political
dimensions of the economic integration of Europe; rationales for European Monetary Union; the theory of optimal currency areas;
the European Central Bank, fiscal and monetary policy in a currency union; the impact of the banking and sovereign debt crises
on the financial stability of the Eurozone.

Literature:
Baldwin and Wyplosz, The Economics of European Integration, ausgewählte Literatur aus Fachbüchern und –zeitschriften

exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, MA 043
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 136, Room MA 043
Description:

This master course is offered for Ph.D students who haven't attended an experimental economics course yet.

Please see the detailed course description at http://www.wiwi-experimente.tu-berlin.de/menue/studium_und_lehre/lehrver....

Requirements: PhD students are required to design an experiment (30% of the final grade) and describe this design in a paper no more than 10 pages. The design should be suitable to answer an original research question either from one of the topics covered or another (new) topic. A key part of the proposal (besides the design) will be a review of the current literature with respect to your proposal – explaining the way in which your research is novel relative to what has been done before.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 136, Room MA 043
Description:

Students are introduced to the methods of economic experiments. They will receive an overview of the field with a focus on more recent reseach topics. Among the topics covered in the course are endowment effects, mental accounting, inattention/salience/shrouding, status-quo bias and defaults, charitable giving, intention-based fairness, level-k reasoning and Quantal Response Equilibrium.

Exam:
Participants have to give a short presentation and pass a final exam.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Description:

This seminar is a research-oriented introduction to experimental economics. The topics of the seminar change every year, and are for example based on recent contributions to market design or contract theory. In the first part of the course, a number of lectures will provide an introduction to the topic with a focus on theory. In a (shorter) second part, the participants will learn how conduct an experiment, e.g. how to recruit participants, how to pay them for their participation, how to run the experiment itself (e.g. with computers or paper-and-pencil), how to analyze the data. The main focus in this part will be on how to design an experiment that addresses the research question in the most effective way. In the last part, participants develop an experimental design, and conduct the experiment at a small scale in order to analyze the data. Students present their findings both in a talk and in a paper.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
08:00am to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21a
Description:

Abstract and Learning Objectives:
Various robust deviations from rational decision making have been reported such as loss aversion, probability weighting, status quo bias, overconfidence etc. Understanding those deviations leads to a more realistic modelling of the behavior of different economic actors and to an increased prediction success. In this course, participants will understand those and other important deviations from rationality as well as their theoretical explanations/modelling, e.g., prospect theory and mental accounting. Most theories have been developed implementing psychological and economic experiments. Whereas psychological experiments are mostly asking the respondents for hypothetical choices, real decisions with actual monetary payoffs are implemented in economic experiments. Half of the course will be concerned with a profound introduction to the several deviations from rationality that have been reported with real decision makers and with the theoretical treatment of those deviations. The other half of the course will deal with different types of experiments and different experimental designs as well as the matching of research question and type of empirical method to be used.

Content:
Whereas the first two days take the form of an interactive lecture and are mostly devoted to laying the basic knowledge in experimental research and behavioral decision theory, the next two days are devoted to specific applications of behavioral decision theory to selected topics in tax compliance, behavioral finance, behavioral insurance, entrepreneurial decisions, venture financing decisions, and consumer behavior. Whereas not all areas of business research are captured in the example studies, the applications are diverse as well as broad enough to have participants from different fields benefit from this course.

Literature: see syllabus

Exam: to be announced

Max. number of BDPEMS participants: 5

Please register with Ute Ottenbreit at the latest by May 31, 2019!

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at Spandauer Straße 1, room 112
Description:

Abstract and Learning Objectives
Various robust deviations from rational decision making have been reported such as loss aversion, probability weighting, status quo bias, overconfidence etc. Understanding those deviations leads to a more realistic modelling of the behavior of different economic actors and to an increased prediction success. In this course, participants will understand those and other important deviations from rationality as well as their theoretical explanations/modelling, e.g., prospect theory and mental accounting. Most theories have been developed implementing psychological and economic experiments. Whereas psychological experiments are mostly asking the respondents for hypothetical choices, real decisions with actual monetary payoffs are implemented in economic experiments. Half of the course will be concerned with a profound introduction to the several deviations from rationality that have been reported with real decision makers and with the theoretical treatment of those deviations. The other half of the course will deal with different types of experiments and different experimental designs as well as the matching of research question and type of empirical method to be used.

Content
Whereas the first two days take the form of an interactive lecture and are mostly devoted to laying the basic knowledge in experimental research and behavioral decision theory, the next two days are devoted to specific applications of behavioral decision theory to selected topics in tax compliance, behavioral finance, behavioral insurance, entrepreneurial decisions, venture financing decisions, and consumer behavior. Whereas not all areas of business research are captured in the example studies, the applications are diverse as well as broad enough to have participants from different fields benefit from this course.

Selected Literature:
Friedman, D., Sunder, S. (1994): Experimental methods: A primer for economists. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK) and New York (USA).
Gigerenzer, G., Todd, P. M. and the ABC Research Group (1999): Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart. Oxford University Press, Oxford (UK).
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.

More literature to be found in the syllabus.

Exam:
to be announced

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Market Design is a growing area of research, and it encompasses a number of different topics of which this seminar/ study project will only cover a subset of. The blog of Al Roth und Peter Coles at http://marketdesigner.blogspot.com/ gives you a good impression of the breadth and policy relevance of the topic.

Credits:
6.00
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Description:

The WZB reading group takes places each Wednesday from 1pm-2.30 pm.

Exam: Two presentations and/or discussions
Location: to be announced

Please contact Philipp Albert (philipp.albert@wzb.eu), if you are interested in joining the reading group.

Credits:
3.00
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Instructor:
Description:

The objective of the “Financial Accounting Research Group” (FARG) is to introduce selected students to current research in financial accounting. Participants of the FARG will learn the necessary skills to understand conceptual underpinnings and common empirical design choices in this area of research.
The FARG is organized around the Finance-Accounting Research Seminar that provides a forum for invited guest speakers to present current research papers. Participants of the FARG are welcome to attend the accounting talks of this seminar and expected to join internal discussion meetings of our institute in preparation of these talks. There are usually three accounting talks and three preparatory discussion meetings per semester. For details on the schedules of current and past semesters, please see here: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/bwl/finance/seminars
Students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) participating in the FARG for at least two semesters and (ii) writing three reviews (or two reviews and a discussion protocol) on papers that are presented by our guest speakers. Students who participated in the FARG for at least two semesters will receive a certificate that confirms their participation. Enrolment into the FARG is possible at the beginning of each semester. Details on the application procedure will be announced in early April (summer term) and early October (winter term) via the website of our institute.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The Institute of Accounting and Auditing is offering a Financial Accounting Research Group. This seminar is targeted at interested students which have an active interest in current financial accounting topics and in cutting-edge financial accounting research. The main objective of this seminar is to introduce eligible students to current research in the area of financial accounting and auditing.
In this context, we will provide participants with the necessary skills to comprehend common research design choices and to identify shortcomings of these choices. To achieve this, participants of the seminar will be invited to several lectures, tutorials and talks of international guests, which will take place at the institute. Since it is common to discuss the content of these talks beforehand, participants will also be invited to the corresponding discussion meetings at the institute. Each seminar period will last for one academic year and we expect participating students to commit to the full year. We expect to have around 12 meetings (6 research talks and 6 discussion meetings) scattered throughout the academic year.
A final seminar schedule will be distributed at beginning of each term. The discussion meetings prior academic talks will be arranged on short notice.
Enrolment into the seminar is possible at the beginning of winter or summer term. Students can chose to obtain 6 ECTS by submitting three reviews (or two reviews and a discussion protocol) on papers that are presented throughout the seminar.
The number of participants is limited. Relevant literature and additional material will be announced throughout the seminar.
The number of participants is limited to 8.
An application form will be available on our institute's website approximately two weeks before the term starts. The application period will end on 18 April 2016.

The exact dates will be announced due time.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
04:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1
Description:

The theory of financial contracts explains the features of financial arrangements, such as debt and equity, the allocation of control rights, etc. from fundamentals of the contracting problem. It provides the basis for the analysis of capital structure decisions, debt overhang, bankruptcy, etc. The focus is on fundamentals and analytic methods.

Exam: One exam at the end of the term.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Description:

The lecture deals with the statistical properties of financial market data and econometric methods that can be used to analyze these data. We will study procedures to test for the efficient market hypothesis and become familiar with methods to model the mean and the volatility of financial data series. Besides the application of nonparametric and classical test procedures, the focus will be on time series methods and models. In particular, ARMA and GARCH models will be covered.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Thursday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Description:

The lecture deals with the statistical properties of financial market data and econometric methods that can be used to analyze these data. We will study procedures to test for the efficient market hypothesis and become familiar with methods to model the mean and the volatility of financial data series. Besides the application of nonparametric and classical test procedures, the focus will be on time series methods and models. In particular, ARMA and GARCH models will be covered.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 22
Description:

The lecture deals with the statistical properties of financial market data and econometric methods that can be used to analyse these data. We will study procedures to test for the efficient market hypothesis and become familiar with methods to model the mean and the volatility of financial data series. Besides the application of nonparametric and classical test procedures, the focus will be on time series methods and models. In particular, ARMA and GARCH models will be covered.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The lecture deals with the statistical properties of financial market data and econometric methods that can be used to analyze these data. We will study procedures to test for the efficient market hypothesis and become familiar with methods to model the mean and the volatility of financial data series. Besides the application of nonparametric and classical test procedures, the focus will be on time series methods and models. In particular, ARMA and GARCH models will be covered.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Dorotheen Strasse 1, Room 05
Description:

The course focuses on Financial Economics through the lens of standard, neoclassical paradigm that postulates that
prices of assets must be determined by marginal utility of the investors. This simple idea has proven extremely
useful in explaining numerous asset pricing facts, but many puzzles remain unsolved, or at least there is no
consensus with respect to the fundamental reasons of why we observe some well-known, real-world phenomena
(like value premium, or profitability of momentum strategies). Much of the recent literature focuses therefore on the
extensions of the standard model, some of which are more plausible (frictions), and some less (large deviations from
investor rationality). But to understand the extensions, it is crucial to know the core, and the best papers are those,
which explain facts using as few departures from the neoclassical world as possible.

Starting: October 23, 2013

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
04:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 203
Description:

The course focuses on theoretical concepts, which are fundamental for corporate finance. Topics include: moral hazard, adverse selection, signaling, incomplete contracts and control rights, coordination failure – all with applications to theory of the firm, organizational design, and financial structure.

Literature:
Bolton and Dewatripont. Contract Theory. MIT Press, 2005,
Tirole. Theory of Corporate Finance. Princeton University Press, 2006, and selected articles

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The course focuses on theoretical concepts, which are fundamental for corporate finance. Topics include: moral hazard, adverse selection, signaling, incomplete contracts and control rights, coordination failure – all with applications to theory of the firm, organizational design, and financial structure.

Literature:
Bolton and Dewatripont. Contract Theory. MIT Press, 2005,
Tirole. Theory of Corporate Finance. Princeton University Press, 2006,
and selected articles.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21b
Description:

The course focuses on theoretical concepts, which are fundamental for corporate finance. Topics include: moral hazard, adverse selection, signaling, incomplete contracts and control rights, coordination failure – all with applications to theory of the firm, organizational design, and financial structure.


Literature:
Bolton and Dewatripont. Contract Theory. MIT Press, 2005,
Tirole. Theory of Corporate Finance. Princeton University Press, 2006, and selected articles

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 005
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 005
Description:

This course is based on academic articles and covers major theories and empirical studies in corporate finance, including financing & investment decisions, risk management, behavioral theories, capital structure, corporate governance and the market for corporate control. In addition, we will examine the impact of financial market regulations on corporate decisions.

Literature:
academic articles

Exam:
seminar papers

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course is based on academic articles and covers major theories and empirical studies in corporate finance, including financing & investment decisions, risk management, behavioral theories, capital structure, corporate governance and the market for corporate control. In addition, we will examine the impact of financial market regulations on corporate decisions.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

Introduction to asset pricing at an advanced level. Topics include: decision-theoretic foundations of asset pricing, consumption-based asset pricing, the fundamental theorem of finance, bounds on the pricing kernel, implications for return predicability, factor models, factor representation of pricing kernels, static and dynamic models of asset pricing under asymmetric information, capital constraints and limits of arbitrage.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Dorotheenstr. 1, room 005
Description:

Instead of an exam, three two-page research proposals will have to be handed in (one for each course part). Please see the attached syllabus for more information.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Description:

This course introduces students to the regulation of financial markets and the participants in these markets. It consists of four parts. The first two parts analyze the financial disclosure requirements of non-financial corporations and the impact of these requirements on corporate policies. The third part discusses the most relevant financial frictions that policy makers should consider when regulating financial institutions. Part IV reviews the economics of financial crises and discusses what regulatory mechanisms exist to prevent financial crises.

Part I: Financial Reporting and Disclosure (Prof. Gassen)

Part II: Recent Changes in Financial Markets Regulations (Prof. Adam)

Part III: Financial Frictions and Macroeconomics (Prof. Weinke)

Part IV: Macroprudential Regulation of Financial Markets (Prof. Heinemann)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 005
Description:

This course introduces students to the regulation of financial markets and the participants in these markets. It consists of three parts. The first two parts analyze the financial disclosure requirements of non-financial corporations and the impact of these requirements on corporate policies. The third part discusses the most relevant financial frictions that policy makers should consider when regulating financial institutions. Part IV reviews the economics of financial crises and discusses what regulatory mechanisms exist to prevent financial crises. 

Course Outline:

  • April 11, 2012: Introduction to Course (fix date of final exam)
  • April 18, 2012: Financial Reporting and Disclosure: An Institutional Primer (Gassen)
  • April 25, 2012: Regulated versus Voluntary Disclosure: Intended and Unintended Consequences (Gassen)
  • May 2, 2012: Financial Reporting and Mechanism Design: Contractual Consequences (Gassen)
  • May 9, 2012: SOX (Adam)
  • May 16, 2012: Financial Reporting and the Capital Market (Gassen)
  • May 23, 2012: Regulation FD* (Adam)
  • May 30, 2012: Rule12h-6 (Adam)
  • June 6, 2012: Financial Frictions in DSGE Models I (Weinke)
  • June 13, 2012: Financial Frictions in DSGE Models II (Weinke)
  • June 20, 2012: Financial Frictions in DSGE Models III (Weinke)
  • June 27, 2012: Basic Mechanisms of Financial Crises (Heinemann)
  • July 4, 2012: Maturity Transformation and Systemic Risk (Heinemann)
  • July 11, 2012: Capital Adequacy Requirements and Lender of Last Resort (Heinemann)

* alternatively: Symposium des Humboldt-Forums Wirtschaft mit dem Thema "Europa -- zum Glück vereint?"

Literature:

syllabus

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
01:00pm to 03:00pm
at HU, Rudower Chaussee 26, 0.311
Thursday,
01:00pm to 03:00pm
at HU, Rudower Chaussee 26, 1.304
Monday,
03:00pm to 05:00pm
at HU, Rudower Chaussee 26, 1.304
Description:

The course is planned to be held in German. Upon request, the course can be held in English!

Zeitlich diskrete stochastische Finanzmarktmodelle und Analyse der entsprechenden martingaltheoretischen und funktionalanalytischen Methoden (Arbitragefreiheit und Martingalmaße, das Cox-Ross-Rubinstein Modell und die Black-Scholes Formel, optimales Stoppen und amerikanische Optionen, Risikomaße) sowie Einführung in zeitstetige Modelle und der pfadweise Ito-Kalkül.

Inhalt:
Einleitung
Ein-Perioden Modelle
Dynamische Absicherungsstrategien in diskreter Zeit
Das Cox-Ross-Rubinstein Modell
Optimalen Stoppen und Amerikanische Optionen
Risikomaße
Der pfadweise Ito-Kalkül
Das Bachelier Modell in stetiger Zeit

Prüfung:
je nach Teilnehmerzahl Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

It is possible that you might not find all of the courses on this page. Please double-check also the Fall 2018 Course Catalogues of each institution:

HU
TU
FU
University of Potsdam
ESMT
DIW

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

It is possible that you might not find all of the courses on this page. Please double-check also the Spring 2019 course catalogues of each institution:

HU
FU
TU
DIW
ESMT

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

It is possible that you might not find all of the courses on this page. Please double-check also the Fall 2018 Course Catalogues of each institution:

HU
TU
FU
ESMT
DIW

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
Description:

We study coordination and incentive problems within and between firms based on seminal and recent research papers from the fields of organizational and personnel economics. We will especially focus on coordination in hierarchies, teamwork, and economic perspectives on leadership.

Literature:
tba

Exam:
There will be a one-hour exam at the end of the course that students need to pass. In addition, students are required to either write a short term paper presenting an own research idea that is related to the topic of the course or write a referee report on a paper covered in the course. The course will be successfully completed if the exam and the term paper/referee report are each graded with 4.0 or better. The final grade for the course will be the average of the two grades.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Friday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Description:

PLEASE NOTE: THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Course dates: April 15, 17, 22, 24, 29 and May 06, 08, 13, 15, 20, 22(tbc), 27, 29 and June 3(tbc)
Time: 9:00 – 13:00.

This course familiarizes students with classic questions and models in industrial organization. We first cover basic models of static as well as dynamic competition with applications to competitive strategy, mergers, collusion, managerial incentives, and trade policy. The course then analyzes in depth competitive strategies of vertical relations and control (B to B contracting) and introduces the extensive literature on two-sided markets. We also briefly discuss research on pricing when consumers violate classic assumptions on consumer behavior, e.g. erroneously analyze prices or contract offers.

Course prerequisites: Students must have completed the first-year microeconomics sequence in the BDPEMS.

Grading/exams: The exact course requirements will be discussed during the first lecture as they depend on how many students participate in the class.

Literature:
We will prescribe numerous original research articles to read. Good textbooks on basic models of industrial organization are:
Tirole (1988), The Theory of Industrial Organization, MIT Press.
Belleflamme and Peitz (2009), Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies
The following textbook introduces questions of antitrust and economic models of competition that have been written to answer them:
Motta (2004), Competition Policy: Theory and Practice
The following textbook highlights implications of various consumer biases on market outcomes:
Spiegler, Ran (2011), Bounded Rationality and Industrial Organization

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15/00.33
Friday, 09:00am at ESMT Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15/00.33
Description:

Course dates: April 16, 23, 25, 30 and May 02, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 28, 30
Time: 9:00 – 13:00.

This course familiarizes students with classic questions and models in industrial organization. We first cover basic models of static as well as dynamic competition with applications to competitive strategy, mergers, collusion, managerial incentives, and trade policy. The course then analyzes in depth competitive strategies of vertical relations and control (B to B contracting) and introduces the extensive literature on two-sided markets. We also briefly discuss research on pricing when consumers violate classic assumptions on consumer behavior, e.g. erroneously analyze prices or contract offers.

Course prerequisites: Students must have completed the first-year microeconomics sequence in the BDPEMS.

Grading/exams: The exact course requirements will be discussed during the first lecture as they depend on how many students participate in the class.

Literature:
We will prescribe numerous original research articles to read. Good textbooks on basic models of industrial organization are:
Tirole (1988), The Theory of Industrial Organization, MIT Press.
Belleflamme and Peitz (2009), Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies
The following textbook introduces questions of antitrust and economic models of competition that have been written to answer them:
Motta (2004), Competition Policy: Theory and Practice
The following textbook highlights implications of various consumer biases on market outcomes:
Spiegler, Ran (2011), Bounded Rationality and Industrial Organization

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course familiarizes students with classic questions and models in industrial organization. We first cover basic models of static as well as dynamic competition with applications to competitive strategy, mergers, collusion, managerial incentives, and trade policy. The course then analyzes in depth competitive strategies of vertical relations and control (B to B contracting) and introduces the extensive literature on two-sided markets. We also briefly discuss research on pricing when consumers violate classic assumptions on consumer behavior, e.g. erroneously analyze prices or contract offers.

Course prerequisites: Students must have completed the first-year microeconomics sequence in the BDPEMS.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15
Friday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15
Description:

This course familiarizes students with classic questions and models in industrial organization. We first cover basic models of static as well as dynamic competition with applications to competitive strategy, mergers, collusion, managerial incentives, and trade policy. The course then analyzes in depth competitive strategies of vertical relations and control (B to B contracting) and introduces the extensive literature on two-sided markets. We also briefly discuss research on pricing when consumers violate classic assumptions on consumer behavior, e.g. erroneously analyze prices or contract offers.

The course starts April 17 and ends May 29th. During that time period, we meet every Wednesday and Friday from 9:00 – 13:00.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THE SEMINAR ROOM HAS CHANGED FROM 00.21 TO 00.15.

Course prerequisites: Students must have completed the first-year microeconomics sequence in the BDPEMS.

Grading/exams: The exact course requirements will be discussed during the first lecture as they depend on how many students participate in the class.

Literature:

We will prescribe numerous original research articles to read. Good textbooks on basic models of industrial organization are:
Tirole (1988), The Theory of Industrial Organization, MIT Press.
Belleflamme and Peitz (2009), Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies

The following textbook introduces questions of antitrust and economic models of competition that have been written to answer them:
Motta (2004), Competition Policy: Theory and Practice

The following textbook highlights implications of various consumer biases on market outcomes:
Spiegler, Ran (2011), Bounded Rationality and Industrial Organization

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:30am to 01:00pm
at ESMT
Description:

Prerequisite: Microeconomics 1, especially a solid understanding of game theory.

This course familiarizes students with classic questions and models in industrial organization and strategic management. We cover mainly classic models of static as well as dynamic competition with applications to competitive strategy, mergers, collusion, managerial incentives, regulation, and trade policy. Nevertheless, some new developments in IO are also discussed in class. Students are meant to learn how various modeling choices determine results as well as develop a through understanding of the game-theoretic tools applied in industrial organization and strategic management.

Background Literature:

  • Tirole (1988), The Theory of Industrial Organization, MIT Press.
  • Motta (2004), Competition Policy: Theory and Practice.
  • Belleflamme and Peitz (2009), Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies
  • Selected journal articles.
Credits:
4.50
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday, 02:00pm at DIW, Schmoller R1.2.026
Description:

Federico Ciliberto (University of Virginia) will hold his lecture from 14:00-17:30 (13.11) until 09:00-12:30(16.11).

This seminar will over two papers in empirical industrial organization in detail to show how frontier methodologies can be implemented in Matlab. By the end of the class, the students will be able to adapt and extend the methodologies to new problems. We will begin with the estimation of complete information, static, discrete games. Then, we will consider the estimation of dynamic models of strategic interaction with incomplete information, with a particular focus on discrete choice dynamic models. Each lecture will consist of two parts: in the first part we will go over selected parts of the articles, where the article makes the fundamental methodological advances; in the second part we will go in detail over how the methodological advances are actually implemented in Matlab. The unifying theme in the two papers is how to use moment inequalities to estimate models of strategic competition.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at tba
Description:

The ability to innovate ensures the competitiveness of high-income countries and its enterprises. At the same time innovations question the classical economic equilibrium models.

The course intends to shed light on different typologies of innovations, also considering multiple methodologies of empirical research in innovation economics. The second part of the course deals with different explanatory approaches of innovation economics: amongst others neo-classical, evolutionary and historic-institutional ones.

The course studies both theoretical models and their empirical application, changing between micro and macro-economic perspectives.

Literature:
G. M. P. Swann (2009): The Economics of Innovation;
P. Stoneman (2002): The Economics of Technological Diffusion;
Schumpeter (1911): A theory of economic development;
Schumpeter (1939): Business Cycles;
Schumpeter (1942): Capitalism, socialism and democracy;
K. J. Arrow (1959): Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention, NBER Working Paper 1856;
V. Sena (2004): The Return of the Prince of Denmark: A Survey on Recent Developments in the Economics of Innovation, The Economic Journal 114, F132-F332;
Nordhaus (1962): Invention, Growth and Welfare;
R. Nelson and S. Winter (1982): An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change;
P. A. Geroski (2000): Models of technology diffusion, Research Policy 29, pp. 603–625

Written exam (2 dates) plus homework assessment/presentation.

Credits:
6.00
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Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at VWS 128, Schleuseninsel, TU Berlin, Müller-Breslau-Str. 15
Description:

The ability to innovate ensures the competitiveness of high-income countries
and its enterprises. At the same time innovations question the classical
economic equilibrium models.

The course intends to shed light on different typologies of innovations,
also considering multiple methodologies of empirical research in innovation
economics. The second part of the course deals with different explanatory
approaches of innovation economics: amongst others neo-classical,
evolutionary and historic-institutional ones.

The course studies both theoretical models and their empirical application,
changing between micro and macro-economic perspectives.

Literature:
G. M. P. Swann (2009): The Economics of Innovation; P. Stoneman
(2002): The Economics of Technological Diffusion; Schumpeter (1911): A
theory of economic development; Schumpeter (1939): Business Cycles;
Schumpeter (1942): Capitalism, socialism and democracy; K. J. Arrow (1959):
Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention, NBER Working
Paper 1856; V. Sena (2004): The Return of the Prince of Denmark: A Survey on
Recent Developments in the Economics of Innovation, The Economic Journal
114, F132-F332; Nordhaus (1962): Invention, Growth and Welfare; R. Nelson
and S. Winter (1982): An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change; P. A.
Geroski (2000): Models oftechnology diffusion, Research Policy 29, pp.
603–625

Exam:
Written exam plus homework assessment/presentation.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Reasons for governmental commitment in technology and research policy, tools of innovation political methods (e.g., Standardization, Basic Research); development and economics of technology and research policy at the national and European level; evaluation of innovation policy (Best Governance of the Innovation System).

For an introduction and a general overview on the topic, please refer to:
http://innovation-policy.net/compendium/

http://www.inno.tu-berlin.de/menue/studium_und_lehre/sommersemester_2014...

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Lectures and presentations on relevant topics of Innovation Policy: Development and economics of technology and research policies at national and European level; evaluation of Innovation Policy (best governance of the innovation system), introduction to empirical innovation research; external guest lectures on current topics in Innovation Policy by institutions of national and European Innovation Policy; papers and discussions of the participants.

Exam: 1 written exam at the end of the semester

Lecture: 10am-12pm
Tutorial: 2-4pm

Credits:
6.00
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Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117
Description:

The course develops core models of international finance, and surveys selected topics in international financial markets; exchange rates and purchasing power parity; international CAPM; equity and bond home biases; determinants of capital flows; sovereign debt crisis; speculative attacks and financial crises; contagion and financial linkages; exchange rate regimes and monetary policy choices; and the stability of the international financial system.

Instructor:
Prof. Marcel Fratzscher, Ph.D.

Time and Venue:
The course takes place generally Fridays from 14:00-16:00 at DIW Berlin. Some exceptions may apply and will be communicated well ahead of time.

Requirements and Grades:
Students will be assessed on the basis of three elements; first, an essay/brief term paper (30%) and presentation thereof (20%) addressing a specific question/paper in an area of choice; second, an empirical exercise with data using an econometric software (50%).

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 03:30pm at DIW, Mohrenstraße 58, Karl Popper Room (2.3.020)
Description:

Researchers face the challenge to translate their academic results to policy makers and to the public. Often the results are derived using complex theoretical or empirical models, which are based on strong assumptions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods and skills, which allow to explain the models and the assumptions to policy makers and to derive results and policy conclusions based on the models.
This course provides an introduction to policy analysis and to evidence-based policy advice. The course addresses the following questions:
How to motivate the research and policy questions?
How to discuss the methods and assumptions used for the policy analysis?
How to discuss limitations of the research design?
How to present the results to policy makers?
How to derive policy conclusions?
During the course students will prepare a policy paper which should be ideally based on a paper of the dissertation. We will focus on oral and written presentations of the policy paper.

Prerequisites:
Students need to have an excellent background in theoretical and empirical methods (Required courses are: Econometrics I&II and two courses out of Micro I&II, Macro I&II or ManSci I&II.) They should have a clear idea of which field they want to write their dissertation in. Moreover, they should have already chosen their supervisor and a topic for a first paper of the dissertation. PhD students have the possibility to take the course in the 3rd or the 5th term.

Organization of the Course:
The course is interactive and applied. In the beginning, the students need to develop a research question with a clear policy focus. The question and the research design can be related to any field of economics. The research question is closely related to the first paper of the dissertation and should be developed in close cooperation with the supervisor.
At the same time, a course advisor from the pool of instructors will be matched with the students. The advisors provide guidance throughout the course and offer office hours.

There will be four class meetings with the following requirements (concrete dates are listed in the syllabus):
1. Introduction (mid October) – organization and example of policy briefing (Tomaso Duso and Peter Haan)
2. Abstract (200 words) of the research project that will be the basis for the policy paper (shortly after the first meeting, mid October). Based on this abstract we will match students to a course advisor.
3. Presentation of the research question (after 4 weeks – mid November)
Students have to hand in a two page description of the question, including a motivation of why the question is important for policy – specifically taking into account the debate relevant to their question – and which research design will be chosen. During the meeting students need to present their research question in 5 minutes.
4. Presentation of the method and assumptions (Mid-term) (after 2 months – mid December)
Mid-term paper: Students have to hand in a five-page description of the method and the assumptions and first preliminary results. During the meeting students need to present their mid-term paper in 7 minutes.
5. Presentation of the results and of the policy conclusions (after 4 months).
Students have to hand in a final 10 page policy paper including executive summary, motivation, method, results and policy conclusion. During the meeting students need to present their results in 10 minutes.

Related Literature:
Jayaraman, R. and J. Rocholl (2017): Research-based policy advice to the G20, G20 Insights, May 21. Available online at http://www.g20-insights.org/policy_briefs/research-based-policy-advice-g20/
Financial Stability Board (2017): Framework for Post-Implementation Evaluation of the Effects of the G20 Financial Regulatory Reforms. Available online at http://www.fsb.org/2017/07/framework-for-post-implementation-evaluation-...

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Search and matching frictions as a fundamental defining attribute of labor markets. Introduction to search theory. Jovanovic’s model. Models of wage-posting. Roy model of spatial mobility. Incorporation of search-matching frameworks in general equilibrium models: Diamond, Mortensen/Pissarides, and other macro models. Welfare analysis.

 

The following topics will be covered in the course:

  • The drawbacks of Marshallian analysis of the labor market
  • Nonsequential and sequential models of search: Stigler v. McCall
  • Search models: A dynamic programming perspective
  • Continuous time formulations
  • Search on the job, directed search
  • The Jovanovic model
  • Equilibrium models of unemployment and search: Diamond/Mortensen/Pissarides
  • Models of wage posting and monopsony (Burdett/Mortensen)
  • Macro models with search frictions in the labor market (Merz, Andolfatto, Shimer)
  • Insights from search and matching models for economics of labor market institutions

 

Literature of Labor Markets with Search and Matching Frictions:

  • Andolfatto, David. 1996. “Business Cycles and Labor-Market Search.” American Economic Review, 86(1): 112–32.
  • Boeri, Tito and Jan van Ours (2009) Imperfect Labor Markets Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Burdett, Keith, and Mortensen, Dale T., (1998) “Wage Differentials, Employer Size, and Unemployment.” International Economic Review 39: 257-273.
  • Cahuc Pierre and André Sylberberg (2004) Labor Economics Cambridge, USA: MIT Press.
  • Diamond, Peter A. (1982) “Aggregate Demand Management in Search Equilibrium.” Journal of Political Economy, 90(5): 881–94.April 12 2010 3.
  • Franz, Wolfgang (2006) Arbeitsmarktökonomik Berlin: Springer.
  • Jovanovic, Boyan (1979a). “Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover.” Journal of Political Economy, 87(5): 972–90.
  • Jovanovic, Boyan (1979b) “Firm-Specific Capital and Turnover.” Journal of Political Economy, 87(6): 1246–60.
  • Lyungqvist Lars and Thomas Sargent (2004) Recursive Macroeconomic Theory Cambridge, USA: MIT Press.
  • Manning, Alan (2003) Monopsony in Motion Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Merz, Monika. 1995. “Search in the Labor Market and the Real Business Cycle.” Journal of Monetary Economics, 36(2): 269–300.
  • Mortensen, Dale T., and Christopher A. Pissarides.1994. “Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment.” Review of Economic Studies, 61(3): 397–415.
  • Mortensen, Dale T., and Christopher A. Pissarides.1999a. “New Developments in Models of Search in the Labor Market,” in Handbook of Labor Economics. O. Ashenfelter and D. Card, eds. Amsterdam: North Holland, 2567–2627.
  • Pissarides, Christopher (2000) Equilibrium Unemployment Theory Cambridge MA MIT Press.
  • Rogerson Richard, Robert Shimer and Randall Wright (2005) “Search-theoretic Models of the Labor Market: A Survey” Journal of Economic Literature 43: 959-588.
  • Sargent, Thomas (1987) Dynamic Macroeconomic Theory Harvard: Harvard University Press Chapter 2.
  • Shimer Robert, (2009) Labor Markets and Business Cycles, Manuscript, University of Chicago.
  • Stigler, George. 1961. “The Economics of Information.” Journal of Political Economy, 69(3):213–25.
  • Shimer, Robert (2005) “The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies.” American Economic Review, 95(1): 25–49.
  • Zenou, Z. (2008) „Job Search and Mobility in Developing Countries: Theory and Policy Implications” Journal of Development Economics 86: 336-355.
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
06:00pm to 08:00pm
at tba
Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
06:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 224
Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA1, R23
Description:

What determines business cycle fluctuations? How can we make causal statements in macroeconomics in general? In this course, students will study concepts, methods and techniques used in empirical macroeconomics. Therefore, it will be a good complement to advanced macroeconomics courses. The course consists of three blocks (see tentative schedule below). In the first block, the course covers basic time series models, estimation and inference methods and forecasting. In the second block, the course will introduce students to the identification of causal effects in macroeconomic time series through restrictions coming from economic theory and/or other information. The third block, subject to time availability, will be devoted to more advanced topcs. Students will also learn how to program in Matlab.

The course consists of a weekly lecture throughout the semester (2SWS). A repetition section (2SWS) will cover analytical and computer exercises. Due to the extensive nature of the material covered, successful completion of the course makes it essential to attend class regularly. Lectures will be in English.
Pre-requisites: IAMA/Advanced Monetary Economics/other advanced macroeconomics courses and Introduction to Econometrics/Macroeconometrics (BSc). In general, students should have taken standard undergraduate level econometrics and be knowledgeable in basic probability and modern dynamic macroeconomic models (DSGE). Some prior knowledge of scientific programming is desirable but not essential for successful completion of the course.

Aims/Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:
(a) Communicate and explain key concepts in (time series) macroeconometrics.
(b) Specify, estimate and critically assess vector autoregressive models.
(c) Understand the concept of identification and the link between DSGE models and the data.
(d) Formulate and solve macroeconometric problems with computer software.
(e) Develop further analytical and computational skills.
(f) Appreciate the differences between empirical approaches to tackle macroeconomic questions.

The following books cover most of the material. Further references/readings will be provided during the lecture.

*Canova, F. (2007) “Methods for Applied Macroeconomic Research”, Princeton University Press
*Hamilton, J.D (1994), Time Series Analysis, Princeton U Press
*Kilian, L and Lütkepohl, H (2017), Structural Vector Autoregressive Analysis (online)
*Lütkepohl, H (2007), New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Description:

This is a methodological course on statistics with a focus on research techniques used in management science. The pre-requisites are a basic level of statistics and probability theory, including distributions, sampling and inference. The topics covered in this course include linear and nonlinear modeling, time-to-event analysis and factor analysis. Applications will focus on areas such as pricing and revenue management. The course will also include empirical work, underlining the link between theory and applications and using statistical software packages such as SPSS, Matlab and SAS. The techniques developed in this course are fundamental research tools in modern management science, and they enable the students to engage in research at the interface of fields such as operations, marketing, finance, and strategy.

Literature:
Details will be provided soon.

Credits:
4.50
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
04:15pm to 05:45pm
at FU Garystr. 21, HS 108
Description:

Wer sich mit moderner Finanzierungstheorie beschäftigt, stößt recht bald auf mathematische Begriffe wie "Martingal" oder "Filtrierung", die nur selten in der Ausbildung zum Betriebs- oder Volkswirt erläutert werden. Ziel dieser Veranstaltung ist es, eine Einführung in den dazugehörigen mathematischen Apparat zu geben und so den Einstieg in die aktuelle finanzwirtschaftliche Forschung zu erleichtern.

Diese Vorlesung ist formal äußerst anspruchsvoll und wendet sich nur an fortgeschrittene Studenten, die keine Berührungsängste mit mathematischen Begriffen besitzen. Da das Gebiet der Martingaltheorie sehr komplex ist, werden wir uns fast ausschließlich auf den mathematischen Kalkül konzentrieren müssen und können praktisch nicht auf die ökonomischen Anwendungen eingehen. Die Vorlesung findet unregelmäßig statt.

Die Vorlesung findet zunächst auf Deutsch statt, später im Semester dann auf Englisch. Aktuelle Informationen zu dieser Veranstaltung, auch zu Zeit und Ort, finden Sie ausschließlich hier: http://www.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/institute/bank-und-finanzwirtschaft/loeff....

The lecture will be held in German first, but is planned to be taught in English after a few sessions.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday,
02:00pm to 05:00pm
at WZB, Room D112/113
Description:

This is a Ph.D. level course on Matching Market Design. The aim of the course is to provide PhD
students with the core knowledge on the field so that they can immediately start their own (theoretical or
experimental) research projects. For this reason, I will cover the most important results and go over the
proofs line by line, which enables students to understand the latest papers in the field.
Market Design concerns the creation of a venue in which buyers and sellers can meet and a format
through which they can interact. There are several applications for which market design has been quite
fruitful, the most notable ones being auction design and matching markets. As one of the most important
functions of markets, matching focuses on who gets what, particularly when the scarce goods are indivisible
and heterogeneous: for exampple, who gets which job at which firm, which buyer transacts with which
seller, which student goes to which school, or which patient gets which transplantable organ. Matching
Market Design aims to design a desirable matching procedure based on reported preferences in terms of
incentive compatibility, efficiency, and fairness.

Grading Requirements:

1. Attendance (20%)
2. Weekly assignments (40%): There will be an homework assignment weekly. Basically it is to prove some results.
I strongly recommend students to work together with your classmates. If so, please write their names explicitly.
3. Presentation (20%): I will list up recent papers. A student is supposed to choose one of them and present it once.
4. Research proposal (20%): Every student needs to write a research proposal in Matching. It can be on theory or
experiments. Please discuss your ideas with me.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA1, R21a
Description:

The course covers a part of mathematical statistics which deals with the limiting behavior of different sample statistics, U-statistics, M-, L- and R-Estimates. This course gives better understanding for the basic tools learned in the elementary Statistics I and II, like Law of Large Numbers, Central Limit Theorem, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Cramer-von-Mises tests, sample mean and sample variance behavior, etc. This course is laying a bridge between the probability theory and the mathematical statistics by manipulating with “probability” theorems to obtain “statistical” theorems.

In the first part of the course we discuss basic tools of asymptotic theory in statistics: convergence in distribution, in probability, almost surely, in mean. We also consider main probability limit laws: LLN and CLT. Then we deal with the usual statistics computed from a sample: the sample distribution function, the sample moments, the sample quantiles, the order statistics. Properties, such as asymptotic normality and almost sure convergence will be derived in the lecture. Afterwards, comes the asymptotics of statistics concocted as transformations of vector of more basic statistics. Next part concerns statistics arising in classical parametric inference and contingency table analysis. These include maximum-likelihood estimates, likelihood-ratio tests, etc. Last part of the course treats U-statistics, statistics obtained as solutions of equations (M-estimates), linear function of order statistics (L-estimates) and rank statistics (R-estimates).

Literature:
R.J.Serfling, Approximation theorems of mathematical statistics, 1980, Wiley series in mathematics.

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Mohrenstr. 39, WIAS (Erhard-Schmidt-Hörsaal)
Description:

The Mathematical Statistics Seminar is one of three regular research seminars hosted by the Sonderforschungsbereich 649 (SFB-649). The SFB-649 facilitates an exchange between national and international scientists. The Mathematical Statistics Seminar covers a wide spectrum of topics with some focus on quantitative analysis methods. During semester the seminar takes place regularly on Wednesdays between 10 am and 12pm in the Erhard- Schmidt-Hörsaal at Weierstraß-Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (Mohrenstr. 39, 10117 Berlin). The presentations are held in English or German.

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at WIAS, Mohrenstraße 39
Description:

The Mathematical Statistics Seminar is one of three regular research seminars hosted by the Sonderforschungsbereich 649 (SFB-649). The SFB-649 facilitates an exchange between national and international scientists. The Mathematical Statistics Seminar covers a wide spectrum of topics with some focus on quantitative analysis methods. During semester the seminar takes place regularly on Wednesdays between 10 am and 12pm in the Erhard- Schmidt-Hörsaal at Weierstraß-Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (Mohrenstr. 39, 10117 Berlin). The presentations are held in English or German.

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course on mathematics aims at refreshing basic mathematical knowledge essential for economic analysis. The course solely deals with deterministic mathematics. For some theorems formally rigorous proofs are presented in order to make participants more comfortable with - and ideally to provide some intuition for - constructing and understanding of mathematical proofs. Throughout the course proper use of notation will be stressed. It covers: sets, relations, preferences; vector spaces and linear algebra; topology and convex optimization; differential calculus.

Literature:
Schofeld, Norman. Mathematical Methods in Economics and Social Choice, Springer
de la Fuente, Angel. Mathematical Methods and Models for Economists, Cambridge University Press

Credits:
0.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday, 10:00am at SPA1, R21a
Description:

Dear BDPEMS students,

I am organizing this semester's micro theory reading group with Roland Strausz.
In case you are not on last semester's mailing list and you are interested in information economics, feel free to join the reading group on the informed principal problem.

First (organizational) meeting
Friday, October 21, 10am (you will be able to attend Anja's talk at 11!)
room 21 a (at HU, Spandauer Str 1)

First paper discussion
Friday, November 4, 10am - 12ish
same room

Reading the abstracts of the "seminal papers" cited below should give you some impression of what to expect. I am very open to include applications as well (see, e.g., Benabou&Tirole's social norms paper).
You may use the following list as a guide to pick a paper to discuss:
https://sites.google.com/site/tmylovanov/informed-principal

Let me know when you are interested so I can put you on the list.

Best regards,
Vincent, vincent.meisner@tu-berlin.de

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The aim of microeconometrics is to analyze individual behavior on the basis of micro data (crosssection and panel data) of individuals, households, and firms. The standard linear regression model is generally not applicable to micro data due to the non-metric measurement and censoring of dependent variables at the individual level, selectivity and incomplete observability of endogenous variables, and the dependence of individual observations over time. The empirical methods most frequently applied in empirical microeconomics are surveyed and several applications in empirical microeconomics are presented. Students learn how to apply these methods using real-world microdata and the software package STATA.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 112
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Literature:
announced at first meeting

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 112
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Literature:
tba

Exam:
Presentations and oral participation

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21b
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Literature:
tba

Exam:
Presentations and oral participation

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday, 03:30pm at DIW, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall/Karl Popper Room
Description:

In this seminar, the participants shall prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the European crisis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (especially the monetary policy of the ECB) as well as the functioning of the financial markets or the contagion effects of the crisis. The paper can be empirical or theoretical and shall orientate towards the academic literature in this field.
To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

Discussion of seminar topics: 29.10.2019, 10:00-12:30 & 31.10.2019, 10:00-12:30
Presentation and discussion of seminar papers: 23.01.2020, 10:00-14:00 & 30.01.2020, 10:00-14:00

Registration: 7.10.2019 - 11.10.2019 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de (Please indicate your program and matriculation number.)

Exam:
Ungraded presentation and discussion, and term paper.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 10:00am at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr.58, Friedensburg room
Description:

Schedule:
Die 10:00-11:30 Einzel (1) M. Fratzscher
Die 10:00-11:30 Einzel (2) M. Fratzscher
Mo 10:00-11:30 Einzel (3) M. Fratzscher
Do 10-13 Einzel (4) M. Fratzscher
Fr 10-13 Einzel (5) M. Fratzscher
Die 10-13 Einzel (6) M. Fratzscher

1) findet am 25.10.2016 statt
2) findet am 01.11.2016 statt
3) findet am 07.11.2016 statt
4) findet am 26.01.2017 statt
5) findet am 27.01.2017 statt
6) findet am 31.01.2017 statt

Discussion of seminar topics: 25.10., 01.11., 07.11.2016
Presentation and discussion of seminar papers: 26.01., 27.01., 31.01.2017

In this seminar, the participants shall prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the European crisis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (especially the monetary policy of the ECB) as well as the functioning of the financial markets or the contagion effects of the crisis.

The paper can be empirical or theoretical and shall orientate towards the academic literature in this field. To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

Restriction to participation: 25
Registration: 10.10.2016 - 15.10.2016 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de
Audience: Master students, PhD (BDPEMS, GC)
Exam: Seminar paper (100%) + presentation and discussion

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
03:00pm to 05:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr.58, Friedensburg Raum 22008
Thursday,
09:00am to 06:00pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Schumpeter Hall
Friday,
09:00am to 06:00pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Schumpeter Hall
Description:

Lecturer: Prof. Marcel Fratzscher, Ph.D.
Place: DIW Berlin, Schumpeter Hall, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin
Time: April 23, 2014, 15:00-17:30 o'clock, Discussion of seminar topics
June 19/20, 2014, 09:00-18:00 o'clock, Presentation and discussion of seminar papers

Short description of content: This seminar requests each participant to prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the European cirsis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (especially the monetary policy of the ECB) as well as the functioning of the financial markets or the contagion effects of the crisis.
The paper can be empirical or theoretical and shall orientate towards the academic literature in this field.
To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

Restriction to participation: 15
Registration: Till 20.04.2014 by e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de
Audience: Master students, PhD (BDPEMS, GC)
Organisatorisches:
MA: 6 SP, Modul: "Topics in Macroeconomics"
Exam: Seminar paper (10-15 pages, 70%) + presentation and discussion (30%)

Credits:
4.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 10:15am at DIW, Garystr. 21, room 105
Description:

Participating students are expected to be familiar with basic time series analysis and methods of econometrics. The course covers advanced methods of modelling and analysing multiple time series. Students are introduced to the models, parameter estimation and specification of the relevant models. They will learn to use them for economic analysis and forecasting.

Contents

Review of univariate time series analysis
Vector autoregressive (VAR) models
Specification and estimation of VAR models
Cointegration
Vector error correction models (VECMs)
Estimation of VECMs
Cointegration tests and specifications of VECMs
Structural vector autoregressive analysis

Literature

Hamilton, J., Time Series Analysis, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1994.
Johansen, S., Likelihood-based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1995.
Lütkepohl, H., New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, 2005.

Thursdays from 10:15 to 11:45 and 14:15 to 15:45. The first lecture will take place on April 21.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at K 005 Seminarraum UG (Garystr. 21)
Thursday,
02:15am to 03:45pm
at K 005 Seminarraum UG (Garystr. 21)
Description:

Participating students are expected to be familiar with basic time series analysis and methods of econometrics. The course covers advanced methods of modelling and analysing multiple time series. Students are introduced to the models, parameter estimation and specification of the relevant models. They will learn to use them for economic analysis and forecasting.

Contents:
- Review of univariate time series analysis
- Vector autoregressive (VAR) models
- Specification and estimation of VAR models
- Cointegration
- Vector error correction models (VECMs)
- Estimation of VECMs
- Cointegration tests and specifications of VECMs
- Structural vector autoregressive analysis

Literature:
H. Lütkepohl, New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, 2005.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, Room 102
Thursday, 10:15am at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, Room 101
Description:

Time/location: Thursdays at 10:15-11:45am in HS 101 and at 2:15-3:45 in HS 102, Garystr. 21.
The first lecture is on April 11, 14:15-15:45.

Participating students are expected to be familiar with basic time series analysis and methods of econometrics. The course covers advanced methods of modelling and analysing multiple time series. Students are introduced to the models, parameter estimation and specification of the relevant models. They will learn to use them for economic analysis and forecasting.

Contents:
- Review of univariate time series analysis
- Vector autoregressive (VAR) models
- Specification and estimation of VAR models
- Cointegration
- Vector error correction models (VECMs)
- Estimation of VECMs
- Cointegration tests and specifications of VECMs
- Structural vector autoregressive analysis

Literature:
H. Lütkepohl, New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, 2005.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Participating students are expected to be familiar with basic time series analysis and methods of econometrics. The course covers advanced methods of modelling and analysing multiple time series. Students are introduced to the models, parameter estimation and specification of the relevant models. They will learn to use them for economic analysis and forecasting. 

Contents:

  • Review of univariate time series analysis
  • Vector autoregressive (VAR) models
  • Specification and estimation of VAR models
  • Cointegration
  • Vector error correction models (VECMs)
  • Estimation of VECMs
  • Cointegration tests and specifications of VECMs
  • Structural vector autoregressive analysis

Literature: 
H. Lütkepohl, New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, 2005.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, Room 104a
Thursday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, Room 104a
Description:

Participating students are expected to be familiar with basic time series analysis and methods of econometrics. The course covers advanced methods of modelling and analysing multiple time series. Students are introduced to the models, parameter estimation and specification of the relevant models. They will learn to use them for economic analysis and forecasting.
 

Contents: 

  • Review of univariate time series analysis
  • Vector autoregressive (VAR) models
  • Specification and estimation of VAR models
  • Cointegration
  • Vector error correction models (VECMs)
  • Estimation of VECMs
  • Cointegration tests and specifications of VECMs
  • Structural vector autoregressive analysis


Literature:
H. Lütkepohl, New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, 2005.

Please note that the first lecture on 12 April 2012 will exceptionnally be from 2:15 to 3:45 pm in the Lecture Room C, Henry-Ford-Bau (Garystraße 35).

 

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
08:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1
Description:

Most of the observable phenomena in the empirical sciences are of a multivariate nature. In financial studies, assets in the stock markets are observed simultaneously and their joint development is analyzed to better understand general tendencies and to track indices. In medicine recorded observations of subjects in different locations are the basis of reliable diagnoses and medication. In quantitative marketing consumer preferences are collected in order to construct models of consumer behavior. The underlying theoretical structure of these and many other quantitative studies of applied sciences is multivariate. The course of Multivariate Statistical Analysis (MVA) describes a collection of procedures which involve observation and analysis of more than one statistical variable at a time.

 

Literature:

- Backhaus, Erichson, Plinke, Weiber (2008, 12. Auflage) Multivariate Analysemethoden, Springer, München, New York

- Johnson, Wichern (1998, 4th edition) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis, Prentice Hall

- Härdle, Hlavka (2007) Multivariate Statistics: Exercises and Solutions, Springer Verlag

- Härdle, Klinke, Müller (1999) XploRe - Academic Edition, The Interactive Statistical Computing Environment, Springer, New York

- Härdle, Simar (2007, 2nd extended ed.) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis, Springer Verlag

- Härdle, Simar (2012), Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis (2nd edititon), Springer Lehrbuch

- Mardia, Bibby, Kent (1979) Multivariate Analysis, Academic Press

 

Exam: Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
08:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 203
Description:

Most of the observable phenomena in the empirical sciences are of a multivariate nature. In financial studies, assets in the stock markets are observed simultaneously and their joint development is analyzed to better understand general tendencies and to track indices. In medicine recorded observations of subjects in different locations are the basis of reliable diagnoses and medication. In quantitative marketing consumer preferences are collected in order to construct models of consumer behavior. The underlying theoretical structure of these and many other quantitative studies of applied sciences is multivariate. The course of Multivariate Statistical Analysis (MVA) describes a collection of procedures which involve observation and analysis of more than one statistical variable at a time.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
08:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 203
Description:

Most of the observable phenomena in the empirical sciences are of a multivariate nature. In financial studies, assets in the stock markets are observed simultaneously and their joint development is analyzed to better understand general tendencies and to track indices. In medicine recorded observations of subjects in different locations are the basis of reliable diagnoses and medication. In quantitative marketing consumer preferences are collected in order to construct models of consumer behavior. The underlying theoretical structure of these and many other quantitative studies of applied sciences is multivariate. The course of Multivariate Statistical Analysis (MVA) describes a collection of procedures which involve observation and analysis of more than one statistical variable at a time.

Literature:
Härdle, Simar (2007, 2nd extended ed.) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis, Springer Verlag

Exam:
one part presentation, other part(s) to be announced

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Most of the observable phenomena in the empirical sciences are of a multivariate nature. In financial studies, assets in the stock markets are observed simultaneously and their joint development is analyzed to better understand general tendencies and to track indices. In medicine recorded observations of subjects in different locations are the basis of reliable diagnoses and medication. In quantitative marketing consumer preferences are collected in order to construct models of consumer behavior. The underlying theoretical structure of these and many other quantitative studies of applied sciences is multivariate. The course of Multivariate Statistical Analysis (MVA) describes a collection of procedures which involve observation and analysis of more than one statistical variable at a time.

Literature:
Härdle, Simar (2007, 2nd extended ed.). Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis, Springer Verlag

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 10:00am at DIW, Mohrenstrasse 58, Friedensburg Room
Description:

The seminar deals with changes and new developments in the theoretical and empirical literature on monetary policy. Topics covered through lectures and seminar papers include the following: the appropriate mandates and objective function of central banks, the relationship between monetary policy and financial supervision, the role of the exchange rates, the functioning of monetary policy in a monetary union, the importance of fiscal dominance, quantitative easing during financial crises, the role of communication of objectives and policies, the functioning of central bank committees, transparency and independence and accountability, global coordination of monetary policy, the international role of the euro and the US dollar.

The course will first start with a series of lectures addressing these various issues. The seminar participants are then asked to prepare a seminar paper on one of the issues, which then have to be presented and discussed towards the end of the semester.
To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

The lectures will take place on 22 and 29 April and 3 May. The seminar presentations will take place on 14 and 19 July.

Location: DIW, Mohrenstr. 58, Friedensburg Room
Restriction to participation: 20
Registration: 11. to 15.04.2016 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de

Grading: Seminar paper (10 - 15 pages, 70 %) + presentation and discussion (30 %)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
at DIW Mohrenstr. 58, Friedensburg Room (2.2.008)
Description:

Course dates: April 20, 22, May 5 and July 2, 3.
Time: 10:00 – 13:00.

The seminar deals with changes and new developments in the theoretical and empirical literature on monetary policy.
Topics covered through lectures and seminar papers include the following: the appropriate mandates and objective function of central banks, the relationship between monetary policy and financial supervision, the role of the exchange rates, the functioning of monetary policy in a monetary union, the importance of fiscal dominance, quantitative easing during financial crises, the role of communication of objectives and policies, the functioning of central bank committees, transparency and independence and accountability, global coordination of monetary policy, the international role of the euro and the US dollar.

The course will first start with a series of lectures addressing these various issues. The seminar participants are then asked to prepare a seminar paper on one of the issues, which then have to be presented and discussed towards the end of the semester.

To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

The lectures will take place on 20 and 22 April and 5 May. The seminar presentations will take place on 2 and 3 July.
Location: DIW, Mohrenstr. 58, Friedensburg Room
Restriction to participation: 20
Registration: 13. to 18.04.2015 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de

Exam: Seminar paper (10 - 15 pages, 70 %) + presentation and discussion (30 %)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 11:00pm
at HU, Rudower Chaussee 26, 1.304
Thursday,
11:00am to 01:00pm
at HU, Rudower Chaussee 26, 3.006
Description:

The course is planned to be held in German. Upon request, the course can be held in English!

Mathematische Grundlagen der nichtkooperativen Spieltheorie (mengenwertige Abbildungen, Fixpunktsätze von Kakutani und Fan-Glicksberg, Key-Fan Theorem), Nash-Gleichgewichte in statischen und dynamischen Spielen, Spiele mit vollständiger und unvollständiger Information, Verhaltensstrategien und sequentielle Gleichgewichte in Markovschen Spielen.

Inhalt:
Statische Spiele: Spiele in Normalform, 2 Personen Nullsummenspiele, Mengenwertige Abbildungen und Fixpunkttheoreme (Schauder, Kakutani, Fan-Glicksberg)
Stochastische Spiele: Markovsche Spiele und Verhaltensstrategien, Gemischte Strategien und der Satz von Kuhn, Spiele mit unvollständiger Information, Sequentielle Gleichgewichte

Prüfung:
je nach Teilnehmerzahl Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21a
Description:

The course Non- and Semiparametric Modelling gives an overview over the flexible regression methods. The course starts with an introduction into the density estimation (histogram, kernel density estimation). Nonparametric regression methods and their applications are discussed. Furthermore additive models will be introduced in the course. At the end of the course the students will be able to implement methods to solve practical problems.

Literature:

Härdle, Müller, Sperlich, Werwatz (2004): Non- and Semiparametric Modelling, Springer
Fan, J. and Gijbels, I. (1996): Local Polynomial Modelling and Its Applications, Chapman and Hall, New York
Härdle, W. (1990): Applied Nonparametric Regression, Econometric Society Monographs No. 19, Cambridge University Press
Härdle, W. (1991): Smoothing Techniques, With Implementations in S, Springer, New York
Härdle, Klinke, Müller (1999): XploRe - Academic Edition, The Interactive Statistical Computing Environment, Springer, New York
Scott, D. W. (1992): Multivariate Density Estimation: Theory, Practice, and Visualization, John Wiley & Sons, New York, Chichester
Silverman, B. W. (1986): Density Estimation for Statistics and Data Analysis, Vol. 26 of Monographs on Statistics and Applied Probability, Chapman and Hall, London
Wand, M. P. and Jones, M. C. (1995): Kernel Smoothing, Chapman and Hall, London
Yatchew, A., (2003): Semiparametric Regression for Applied Econometrician, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge

Students can purchase the Professional Edition of XploRe and/or a bookset for a reduced price. For details please ask the lecturer or send an email to mdtech@mdtech.de.

Exam:
written

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The course Non- and Semiparametric Modelling gives an overview over the flexible regression methods. The course starts with an introduction into the density estimation (histogram, kernel density estimation). Nonparametric regression methods and their applications are discussed. Furthermore additive models will be introduced in the course. At the end of the course the students will be able to implement methods to solve practical problems.

Literature:
Härdle, Müller, Sperlich, Werwatz (2004): Non- and Semiparametric Modelling, Springer
Fan, J. and Gijbels, I. (1996): Local Polynomial Modelling and Its Applications, Chapman and Hall, New York
Härdle, W. (1990): Applied Nonparametric Regression, Econometric Society Monographs No. 19, Cambridge University Press
Härdle, W. (1991): Smoothing Techniques, With Implementations in S, Springer, New York
Härdle, Klinke, Müller (1999): XploRe - Academic Edition, The Interactive Statistical Computing Environment, Springer, New York
Scott, D. W. (1992): Multivariate Density Estimation: Theory, Practice, and Visualization, John Wiley & Sons, New York, Chichester
Silverman, B. W. (1986): Density Estimation for Statistics and Data Analysis, Vol. 26 of Monographs on Statistics and Applied Probability, Chapman and Hall, London
Wand, M. P. and Jones, M. C. (1995): Kernel Smoothing, Chapman and Hall, London
Yatchew, A., (2003): Semiparametric Regression for Applied Econometrician, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21a
Description:

The course Non- and Semiparametric Modelling gives an overview over the flexible regression methods. The course starts with an introduction into the density estimation (histogram, kernel density estimation). Nonparametric regression methods and their applications are discussed. Furthermore additive models will be introduced in the course. At the end of the course the students will be able to implement methods to solve practical problems.

Literature:

  • Härdle, Müller, Sperlich, Werwatz (2004): Non- and Semiparametric Modelling, Springer
  • Fan, J. and Gijbels, I. (1996): Local Polynomial Modelling and Its Applications, Chapman and Hall, New York
  • Härdle, W. (1990): Applied Nonparametric Regression, Econometric Society Monographs No. 19, Cambridge University Press
  • Härdle, W. (1991): Smoothing Techniques, With Implementations in S, Springer, New York
  • Härdle, Klinke, Müller (1999): XploRe - Academic Edition, The Interactive Statistical Computing Environment, Springer, New York
  • Scott, D. W. (1992): Multivariate Density Estimation: Theory, Practice, and Visualization, John Wiley & Sons, New York, Chichester
  • Silverman, B. W. (1986): Density Estimation for Statistics and Data Analysis, Vol. 26 of Monographs on Statistics and Applied Probability, Chapman and Hall, London
  • Wand, M. P. and Jones, M. C. (1995): Kernel Smoothing, Chapman and Hall, London
  • Yatchew, A., (2003): Semiparametric Regression for Applied Econometrician, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge

Students can purchase the Professional Edition of XploRe and/or a bookset for a reduced price. For details please ask the lecturer or send an email to mdtech@mdtech.de.

Exam:
written
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday, 10:00am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21b
Description:

In the macroeconomic literature, models are characterized by non-linear dynamical features. The use of standard linear methods can no longer be appropriate to solve such general equilibrium macroeconomic models. The inaccuracy of standards methods can have non trivial consequences on models outcomes. We therefore need methods to solve such models. The aim of this course is to introduce the non-linear methods. This course attempts to provide theories and materials (Matlab codes) for solving DSGE models with nonlinear methods. A particular emphasis will be placed on projections methods which allows to deal with kink. Simulations and accuracy tests will be investigated.

Literature:

-Den Haan, W. and Marcet, A. (1990): “Solving the Stochastic Growth Modelby Parameterizing Expectations,” Journal of Business & Economic Statistics., Vol. 8. pp. 31-34.

-Den Haan,W. and Marcet, A. (1994): “Accuracy in simulations” Review of Economic Studies., Vol. 61(1). pp. 3-17.

-Judd, K. (1998): “Numerical methods in economics,” MIT press.

-Judd, K., Maliar L. and Maliar, S. (2011): “Numerically stable and accurate stochastic simulation approaches for solving dynamic economic models” Journal of Business & Economic Statistics., Vol. 21(1), pp. 88-92.

-Heer, B. and Maussner, A. (1998): “Dynamic General Equilibrium Modelling: computational methods and applications,” Springer.

-Maliar L. and Maliar, S. (2003): “Parameterized Expectations Algorithm

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
08:00am to 12:00pm
at 1st part: SPA1, R025; 2nd part: SPA1, R21b
Description:

Log-Lineraization, Policy Function Iteration, Value Function Iteration, Model Evaluation, 2nd Order Approximation

 

Literature:

Ljungqvist, L. and T. Sargent, Recursive Macroeconomic Theory, MIT Press.

Marimon, R. and A. Scott, editors, Computational Methods for the Study of Dynamic Economies, Oxford University Press 1999.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
08:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Spandauer Str. 1, room 026 (PC pool)
Description:

This course will cover a variety of numerical methods for solving dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, including policy and value function iteration, log-linearization and Euler equation methods. In addition, students will learn how to choose parameters for models by calibration.

Exam: 3 take-home problem sets

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course will cover a variety of numerical methods for solving dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, including policy and value function iteration, log-linearization and Euler equation methods. In addition, students will learn how to choose parameters for models by calibration.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
09:30am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Description:

Objectives:
This seminar aims to provide foundation knowledge in the Organizational Behavior (OB) field, including classic and contemporary theories, ongoing controversies, and ground breaking empirical studies. Drawing on multiple disciplines such as psychology, sociology, and communication, this course focuses on behavioral phenomena at and across individual, group/team/departmental, and firm levels, including attitudes, motivation, leadership, emotions, group processes, team effectiveness, creativity, and organizational culture, among others. The course also pays particular attention to different empirical approaches in the OB field, surveying a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods.

Overview of Class Sessions
(9:30 am – 1:00 pm)

1 – May 15 (Thur) Introduction to Organizational Behavior Research
2 – May 22 (Thur) Management Classics: Motivation, Organizational Commitment and Leadership
3 – May 28 (Wed)* Emotions in Organizations
4 – June 5 (Thur) Groups and Teams

June 6th 5 pm Paper proposal due

5 – June 12 Independent session (no class; office hour or appointment to be offered)
6 – June 19 Beyond What is Obvious

7 – June 26 Paper Presentation (Term paper due)

(Note: * Most class sessions occur on Thursday morning, except May 28th is Wednesday. The class schedule listed above is subject to change with notice. There is no “academic quarter” - please come to class on time. Visitors and speakers will be invited to the class. )

You will be evaluated by the following dimensions for this course:

Class Participation and Contribution: 35 %
Critique assignment: 15 %
Term paper and presentation: 50% (Presentation 15% and Paper 35%)

Credits:
4.50
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT (the room number will be displayed on the info screen, foyer Schlossplatz entrance)
Description:

This seminar aims to provide foundation knowledge in the Organizational Behavior (OB) field, including classic and contemporary theories, ongoing controversies, and ground breaking empirical studies. Drawing primarily on psychology and sociology, this course has a special focus on the role of the individuals and teams within organizations. Major topics include: individual personality, attitudes and emotions, motivation, leadership, organizational justice, group/team diversity and processes, power and influence, organizational culture, and social networks. It is critical to read the required readings before class and spend some time thinking about the implications of the readings, both separately and as a collection.

Some background readings include:

Davis, M. (1971). That’s interesting! Philosophy of Social Science, 309-344.
Dutton, J. E. & Dukerich, J. M. (2006). The relational foundation of research: An underappreciated dimension of interesting research. Academy of Management Journal, 49, 21-26.
Heath, C., & Sitkin, S. (2000). Big-B versus Big-O: An examination into what is distinctly organizational about organizational behavior. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 22, 1-16.
Sutton, R. I. & Staw, B. M. (1995). What theory is not. Administrative Science Quarterly, 40, 371-384.

There will be no in-class exam in this course. However, each participant is expected to turn in a term paper and present it in class, which is the equivalent of the final exam. Specifically,

The term paper is a research proposal due in our last class. The research proposal provides each student the opportunity to conceive and plan a study on some issue within the domain of the course. An initial one-page proposal for your study is expected. In the term paper, you should provide a literature review of the related work to-date, a theoretical framework consisting of hypotheses, and methodology to be used for testing the hypotheses (for the format, use AMJ publications as examples). The paper should be in no more than 15 double-spaced pages of text. Each student will give a 20 minutes presentation of his or her term paper in the last class (pending on the number of participants).

Dates:
November 30, 2012
December 7, 2012
December 14, 2012
January 11, 2013
January 18, 2013
January 25, 2013
February 1, 2013

Credits:
4.50
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 22
Thursday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at SPA1, R22
Description:

Basic concepts, models with fixed and random effects, specification tests, simultaneous equations and dynamic models, models for qualitative dependent variables.

Literature:
Badi H. Baltagi: Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, Wiley & Sons, 1995

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analyzing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.

In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 10:00am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21a
Description:

This course studies recent developments in the literature on “persuasion games”. The goal is to develop a good understanding of these games, their theoretical underpinning, and the underlying economic mechanisms which they capture and emphasize. In each session a course participant actively presents a specific research papers in this field for 45 to 60 minutes, pointing out and explaining its main contributions. In the remaining 45 to 30 minutes, all course participants jointly and actively discuss the relevance and the relation to the rest of this literature. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions and participate actively.

Credits:
4.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday, 10:00am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

This course studies recent developments in the literature on “persuasion games”. The goal is to develop a good understanding of these games, their theoretical underpinning, and the underlying economic mechanisms which they capture and emphasize. In each session a course participant actively presents a specific research papers in this field for 45 to 60 minutes, pointing out and explaining its main contributions. In the remaining 45 to 30 minutes, all course participants jointly and actively discuss the relevance and the relation to the rest of this literature. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions and participate actively.

Credits:
4.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
10:00am to 05:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

The Preparatory Math Course aims to equip students with the necessary math background for the first year (compulsory) economics graduate level courses. It is mainly meant to be a refresher of existing math knowledge. More information will follow soon.

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Tuesday,
10:00am to 05:00pm
at HU, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21 A
Description:

The Preparatory Math Course aims to equip students with the necessary math background for the first year (compulsory) economics graduate level courses. It is mainly meant to be a refresher of existing math knowledge. Please find a list of the topics that will be covered in the attached syllabus. Students who feel unfamiliar with some of these topics are encouraged to read up on them prior to the start of the course. A useful set of references is provided at the end of the syllabus. Please also note the attached timetable.

Please note that only on October 2, 2018, the course will be held at DIW, Schwartz Room.

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Instructor:
Monday,
12:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 125
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room H 0107
at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room H 5143a (tutorial)
Description:

The course discusses aspects of international taxation from a public economics point of view. The focus is on capital tax competition between jurisdictions (countries, states, municipalities). The students gain insights into the reasons for the inefficient provision of public goods due to detrimental tax competition and become acquainted with policy instruments to mitigate tax competition. We also address other issues like, e.g., commodity tax competition, international profit shifting (tax planning) of multinational firms and taxation of foreign profits.

There will be a tutorial, the time slot will be discussed in the first session of the lecture in order to account for the Ph.D. students’ preferences.

Syllabus:
- Basic principles of international taxation
- Basic framework of capital tax competition and harmonization
- Tax competition and foreign firm ownership
- Tax competition and fiscal equalization
- (Further) Reasons for inefficient overtaxation
- Taxation of foreign profits of multinational firms
- Profit shifting of multinational firms
- Separate Accounting versus Formula Apportionment in corporate taxation
- Preferential tax regimes in international taxation
- Commodity tax competition

Literature: A reading list is provided in the first session of the lecture.

Exam: 1 written exam at the end of the semester

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Gebäudeteil Mechanik, room M 128 (lecture)
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Hauptgebäude, room H3004 (tutorial)
Description:

Please note that there is both a lecture and a tutorial:

Instructor(s): Marco Runkel (lecture), Zarko Kalamov (tutorial)
Time frame (date of first and last class): October 17, 2017 until February 13, 2018 (lecture), October 20, 2017 until February 16, 2018 (tutorial)
Weekday(s): Tuesday (lecture), Friday (tutorial)
Time(s): 10am – 12am (lecture), 2pm – 4pm (tutorial)
Location(s): Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Gebäudeteil Mechanik, room M 128 (lecture)
Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Hauptgebäude, room H3004 (tutorial)

English description of the course: given in the first session
Literature: given in the first session
Exam: final exam (90 minutes)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at Frauenhoferstrasse 33-36 - FH314
Description:

Content:

Basic principles of international taxation
Basis framework of capital tax competition
Tax harmonization, tax coordination and fiscal equalization
Tax competition and foreign firm ownership
Tax competition and fiscal equalization
Taxation of foreign profits of multinational firms
Profit shifting of multinational firms
Seperate Accounting versus Formula Apportionment in corporate taxation
Preferential tax regimes in international taxation
Commodity tax competition

Literature:
Haufler, A. (2001), Taxation in a Global Economy, Cambridge University Press.

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Instructor:
Wednesday, 08:00am at FH 314, Fraunhoferstr. 33 – 36, 10587 Berlin
Description:

The students

  • Get introduced into the fundamental effects of taxes on capital ows and trade in open economies
  • Learn about the consequences of globalization on national and international tax policy
  • Gain insights into the reasons for the inecient provision of public goods due to tax competition
  • Become aquainted with policy instruments to mitigate tax competition
  • Acquire knowledge about prot shifting of multinational rms and dierent corporate tax systems
  • Learn how international trade of goods and services should be taxes

Literature: Literature: Haufler, A. (2001), Taxation in a Global Economy, Cambridge University Press

 

Exam: written

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at TU Berlin, Room H 5143 A, 5. floor
Description:

The students

· Get introduced into the fundamental eects of taxes on capital ows and trade in open economies

· Learn about the consequences of globalization on national and international tax policy

· Gain insights into the reasons for the inecient provision of public goods due to tax competition

· Become aquainted with policy instruments to mitigate tax competition

· Acquire knowledge about prot shifting of multinational rms and dierent corporate tax systems

· Learn how international trade of goods and services should be taxes

Literature: Haufler, A. (2001), Taxation in a Global Economy, Cambridge University Press

Exam: written, one, 24. February, 11 am – 13 pm, room EB 407, Strasse des 17. Juni 145, 10623 Berlin

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135 (Hauptgebäude), Room H 5143a
Description:

There will be an additional tutorial, reading course for Ph.D. students (1 hour).
Time slot will be discussed in the first session of the lecture in order to account for the Ph.D. students¹ preferences

The course discusses aspects of international taxation from a public economics point of view. The focus is on capital tax competition between jurisdictions (countries, states, municipalities). The students gain insights into the reasons for the inefficient provision of public goods due to detrimental tax competition and become acquainted with policy instruments to mitigate tax competition.
We also address other issues like, e.g., commodity tax competition, international profit shifting (tax planning) of multinational firms and taxation of foreign profits.

Syllabus:
- Basic principles of international taxation
- Basic framework of capital tax competition and harmonization
- Tax competition and foreign firm ownership
- Tax competition and fiscal equalization
- (Further) Reasons for inefficient overtaxation
- Taxation of foreign profits of multinational firms
- Profit shifting of multinational firms
- Separate Accounting versus Formula Apportionment in corporate taxation
- Preferential tax regimes in international taxation
- Commodity tax competition

Literature: A reading list is provided in the first session of the
lecture.

Exam:
One written exam at the end of the semester

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday, 08:00am at SPA1, R21b
Description:

Bayesian methods have become increasingly popular, especially in macroeconomics. The large dimensionality of macro-econometric models and the complexity of modern DSGE models often require the use of prior information and computational algorithms to conduct econometric inference. This course will give an introduction to Bayesian estimation both from a technical and practical point of view. The curriculum will cover basic notions of Bayesian inference and posterior simulators, with applications to regression and state space models. Empirical applications and more advanced topics will be treated in reading groups. Although the focus of the course is on macro-oriented models, micro-oriented student presentations are encouraged. This course is tailored towards advanced masters and graduate students in Economics or other related disciplines.

Please see the attached syllabus for more detailed information. Registration will take place in the first lecture.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA1, R23
Description:

Reading group on mechanism design without transfers

Literature: Original papers on mechanism design without transfers
Exam (written?): No

Credits:
3.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at tba.
Description:

Please see the attached syllabus for more information.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

The course is designed to train students in the use of advanced methods of theoretical and empirical analyses of labor market regulations and to introduce them to the cutting edge of labor market regulation research. The focus will be on four topics:

Part I: Theory of Labor market imperfections (Burda)
Part II: Labor in Economic Development (Jayaraman)
Part III: Regulation of Markets for Education (Kübler)
Part IV: Theory of Labor Market Regulation (Schöb)

Please find more information in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 23
Description:

The course is designed to train students in the use of advanced methods of theoretical and empirical analyses of labor market regulations and to introduce them to the cutting edge of labor market regulation research. The focus will be on three topics: the theory of labor market regulations, the role of public education for the development of the labor market and the analysis of the interaction between product and labor market regulation.

Outline:
Introduction (April 12, 2012)
I. Regulation of markets for education (Kübler: April 19/26, 2012)
II. Labor in Economic Development (Jayaraman: May 3/10/24, 2012)
III. Theory of labor market regulation (Schöb: May 31, June 7, 2012 à 3 hours)
IV. Product market regulation and the labor market (Spitz-Oener: June 21/28, July 5/12, 2012)

Literature:
Selected journal articles, see attached syllabus

Exam:
to be announced

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

This course introduces students to the regulation of financial markets and the participants in these markets. It consists of four parts. The first two parts analyze the financial disclosure requirements of non-financial corporations and the impact of these requirements on corporate policies. The third part discusses the most relevant financial frictions that policy makers should consider when regulating financial institutions. Part IV reviews the economics of financial crises and discusses what regulatory mechanisms exist to prevent financial crises.

Part I: Financial Reporting and Disclosure (Prof. Gassen)

Part II: Recent Changes in Financial Markets Regulations (Prof. Adam)

Part III: Financial Frictions and Macroeconomics (Prof. Weinke)

Part IV: Macroprudential Regulation of Financial Markets (Prof. Heinemann)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Friday, 02:15pm at SPA1, room 21b
Description:

The objective of the course is twofold. First, it familiarizes students with the most standard results and standard analyses of regulation in product markets. This part of the course addresses, in particular, regulatory issues due to market power and focuses on monopoly regulation. Second, the course discusses regulatory issues that are directly related to the research themes of the doctoral program, in particular the regulation of networks and environmental regulation.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21b
Description:

The objective of the course is twofold. First, it familiarizes students with the most standard results and standard analyses of
regulation in product markets. The course addresses, in particular, regulatory issues due to market power and concentrates on
monopoly, merger regulation and anti-trust. Second, the course discusses regulatory issues that are directly related to the research
themes of the doctoral program, in particular environmental regulation and regulation in vertical relationships.

Course Outline:
I. Price and Monopoly Regulation (Strausz)
II. Regulation in Networks: interconnected networks and switching costs (Bedre-Defolie)
III. Regulation in Vertical Markets (Baake)
IV. Environmental Regulation (Schmidt)

Please note that the grades will be obtained throughout the course, there will be no exam at the end of the lecture period.

25.10.2013: Roland Strausz
01.11.2013: Roland Strausz
08.11.2013: Roland Strausz
15.11.2013: Özlem Bedre (Lecture starts at 14:00 sharp)
22.11.2013: Özlem Bedre (Lecture starts at 14:00 sharp)
29.11.2013: Özlem Bedre (Lecture starts at 14:00 sharp)
06.12.2013: Özlem Bedre (Lecture starts at 14:00 sharp)
13.12.2013: Pio Baake
20.12.2013: Pio Baake
10.01.2014: Pio Baake
17.01.2014: Pio Baake
24.01.2014: Robert Schmidt
31.01.2014: Robert Schmidt
07.02.2014: Robert Schmidt
14.02.2014: Robert Schmidt

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 22
Description:

The objective of the course is twofold. First, it familiarizes students with the most standard results and standard analyses of regulation in product markets. The course addresses, in particular, regulatory issues due to market power and concentrates on monopoly, merger regulation and anti-trust. Second, the course discusses regulatory issues that are directly related to the research themes of the doctoral program, in particular environmental regulation and regulation in vertical relationships.

 
Course Outline:
I. Antitrust and Merger Regulation (Bester)
II. Price and Monopoly Regulation (Strausz)
III. Regulation in Vertical Markets (Baake)
IV. Environmental Regulation (Schmidt)
 
Literature:
see RTG website
 
Exam:
written exam (90 min)
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The objective of the course is twofold. First, it familiarizes students with the most standard results and standard analyses of regulation in product markets. The course addresses, in particular, regulatory issues due to market power and concentrates on monopoly, merger regulation and anti-trust. Second, the course discusses regulatory issues that are directly related to the research themes of the doctoral program, in particular environmental regulation and regulation in vertical relationships.

Course Outline:
I. Antitrust and Merger Regulation (Bester)
II. Price and Monopoly Regulation (Strausz)
III. Regulation in Vertical Markets (Baake)
IV. Environmental Regulation (Schmidt)
 
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at SPA1, R22
Description:

The objective of the course is twofold. First, it familiarizes students with the most standard results and standard analyses of regulation in product markets. The course addresses, in particular, regulatory issues due to market power and concentrates on monopoly, merger regulation and anti-trust. Second, the course discusses regulatory issues that are directly related to the research themes of the doctoral program, in particular environmental regulation and regulation in vertical relationships.

Literature:
see: http://lehre.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/Professuren/vwl/mt/RTG/syllabus-regulatio...

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course offers students the possibility to learn about ongoing research in behavioral and experimental economics through seminar presentations from external scholars. Students who want to take this course for credit need to write three referee reports per semester selected from the list of papers that are presented and hand these in three days before the seminar. In addition, they need to attend both semi-annual internal all-day workshops and present own original research in at least one of these workshops.

Prerequisite:
Students should have taken a PhD-level class in behavioral or experimental economics.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:


Prerequisite:

Students should have taken a PhD-level class in behavioral or experimental economics.

 

Please note, that you have to participate two semesters in this research class in order to achieve 6 ECTS Students who want to take the two-semester sequence for credit should also attend the preliminary (organizational) meeting: October 20, 15:00 at WZB.

The course offer students the possibility to learn about ongoing research in behavioral and experimental economics through seminar presentations from external scholars. Students who want to take this course for credit need to write three referee reports per semester selected from the list of papers that are presented and hand these in three days before the seminar (i.e. deadline is 1pm on the last Monday prior to the seminar). In addition, they need to attend both semi-annual internal all-day workshops and present own original research in at least one of these workshops.

 

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
04:30pm to 06:00pm
at ESMT (the room number will be displayed on the info screen, foyer Schlossplatz entrance)
Description:

Prerequisite:

Students should have taken a PhD-level class in behavioral or experimental economics.
Please note that you have to participate in this research class for two semesters in order to achieve 6 ECTS. Students who want to take the two-semester sequence for credit should also attend the preliminary (organizational) meeting: Wednesday, October 24, 16:00 at ESMT, Room 'Garden View'.

The course offers students the possibility to learn about ongoing research in behavioral and experimental economics through seminar presentations from external scholars. Students who want to take this course for credit need to write three referee reports per semester selected from the list of papers that are presented and hand these in three working days before the seminar (i.e. deadline is 1pm on the last Friday prior to the seminar). In addition, they need to attend both semi-annual internal all-day workshops and present own original research in at least one of these workshops.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstr. 1, Room 405
Description:

The course will introduce students to current research topics in financial intermediation, via reading, presenting, and discussing papers together. We will start with more “classic” topics such as bank runs (e.g. Diamond and Dybvig 1983, Allen and Gale 1998, Morris and Shin 1998) and techniques for estimating the effect of bank balance sheet shocks on credit supply (Khwaja and Mian 2008). Other topics in the area of financial intermediation will be chosen according to the specific interests of seminar participants. Participants will learn about the literature and thereby be better able to find their own research topics that contribute to said literature.

Literature:
Academic papers

Exam:
Term paper (30,000 characters)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 01:00pm
at WZB, Reichpietschufer 50, room B004
Description:

The course will provide an overview of some select topics in development economics. The starting point will be a short treatment of macro-economic approaches to development, particularly, a) classical growth theories, the convergence debate, and its policy implications; b) comparative development--culture, geography, and institutions; and c) unified growth theory: growth over the last 13,000 years.

From there, the course will move to a more micro-oriented perspective, which will be the focus of the rest of the course. This part will start from a methodological discussion on how to detect and quantify the causal effects of policy interventions and development programs. Then some select topics will be addressed, amongst which:
- the condition of the poor, poverty lines, and risk exposure
- economic preferences: measurement, determination, and their role in farming and investment decisions
- credit and insurance: formal and informal institutions
- health and fertility decisions

The course will mostly be based on the presentation and critical discussion of papers, combined with about 1/3 of presentation of more formal theory by the instructor. The students are encouraged to actively partake in the discussions, and substantial reading prior to the sessions is a requirement. This is indeed necessary to obtain at least a superficial understanding of a very large research field. The length of the course will depend on the number of students.

Literature: to be determined

Course dates: The course, which includes 3 hours per week, starts on October 14 and ends in December (date tba.).

Exam: The grade will be made up of a presentation during the class (30%), class participation and discussion (20%), and a final essay (50%).

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday, 12:15am at Spandauer Str. 1, R 21b
Description:

Description of the course:
The course covers a part of mathematical statistics which deals with the limiting behavior of different sample statistics, U-statistics, M-, L- and R-Estimates. This course gives better understanding for the basic tools learned in the elementary Statistics I and II, like Law of Large Numbers, Central Limit Theorem, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Cramer-von-Mises tests, sample mean and sample variance behavior, etc. This course is laying a bridge between the probability theory and the mathematical statistics by manipulating with “probability” theorems to obtain “statistical” theorems.
In the first part of the course we discuss basic tools of asymptotic theory in statistics: convergence in distribution, in probability, almost surely, in mean. We also consider main probability limit laws: LLN and CLT. Then we deal with the usual statistics computed from a sample: the sample distribution function, the sample moments, the sample quantiles, the order statistics. Properties, such as asymptotic normality and almost sure convergence will be derived in the lecture. Afterwards, comes the asymptotics of statistics concocted as transformations of vector of more basic statistics. Next part concerns statistics arising in classical parametric inference and contingency table analysis. These include maximum-likelihood estimates, likelihood-ratio tests, etc. Last part of the course treats U-statistics, statistics obtained as solutions of equations (M-estimates), linear function of order statistics (L-estimates) and rank statistics (R-estimates).

Literature:
R.J.Serfling, Approximation theorems of mathematical statistics, 1980, Wiley series in mathematics.

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1
Description:

The course covers a part of mathematical statistics which deals with the limiting behavior of different sample statistics, U-statistics, M-, L- and R-Estimates. This course gives better understanding for the basic tools learned in the elementary Statistics I and II, like Law of Large Numbers, Central Limit Theorem, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Cramer-von-Mises tests, sample mean and sample variance behavior, etc. This course is laying a bridge between the probability theory and the mathematical statistics by manipulating with “probability” theorems to obtain “statistical” theorems. In the first part of the course we discuss basic tools of asymptotic theory in statistics: convergence in distribution, in probability, almost surely, in mean. We also consider main probability limit laws: LLN and CLT. Then we deal with the usual statistics computed from a sample: the sample distribution function, the sample moments, the sample quantiles, the order statistics. Properties, such as asymptotic normality and almost sure convergence will be derived in the lecture. Afterwards, comes the asymptotics of statistics concocted as transformations of vector of more basic statistics. Next part concerns statistics arising in classical parametric inference and contingency table analysis. These include maximum-likelihood estimates, likelihood-ratio tests, etc. Last part of the course treats U-statistics, statistics obtained as solutions of equations (M-estimates), linear function of order statistics (L-estimates) and rank statistics (R-estimates).

 

Literature: R.J.Serfling, Approximation theorems of mathematical statistics, 1980, Wiley series in mathematics.

 

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1 , 21b
Description:

The course covers a part of mathematical statistics which deals with the limiting behavior of different sample statistics, U-statistics, M-, L- and R-Estimates. This course gives better understanding for the basic tools learned in the elementary Statistics I and II, like Law of Large Numbers, Central Limit Theorem, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Cramer-von-Mises tests, sample mean and sample variance behavior, etc. This course is laying a bridge between the probability theory and the mathematical statistics by manipulating with "probability" theorems to obtain "statistical" theorems. In the first part of the course we discuss basic tools of asymptotic theory in statistics: convergence in distribution, in probability, almost surely, in mean. We also consider main probability limit laws: LLN and CLT. Then we deal with the usual statistics computed from a sample: the sample distribution function, the sample moments, the sample quantiles, the order statistics. Properties, such as asymptotic normality and almost sure convergence will be derived in the lecture. Afterwards, comes the asymptotics of statistics concocted as transformations of vector of more basic statistics. Next part concerns statistics arising in classical parametric inference and contingency table analysis. These include maximum-likelihood estimates, likelihood-ratio tests, etc. Last part of the course treats U-statistics, statistics obtained as solutions of equations (M-estimates), linear function of order statistics (L-estimates) and rank statistics (R-estimates).

Literature:
Sering R.J. (1980) Approximation Theorems of Mathematical Statistics / Wiley.

Exam:
oral exam

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21a
Description:

The course covers a part of mathematical statistics which deals with the limiting behavior of different sample statistics, U-statistics, M-, L- and R-Estimates. This course gives better understanding for the basic tools learned in the elementary Statistics I and II, like Law of Large Numbers, Central Limit Theorem, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Cramer-von-Mises tests, sample mean and sample variance behavior, etc. This course is laying a bridge between the probability theory and the mathematical statistics by manipulating with "probability" theorems to obtain "statistical" theorems. In the first part of the course we discuss basic tools of asymptotic theory in statistics: convergence in distribution, in probability, almost surely, in mean. We also consider main probability limit laws: LLN and CLT. Then we deal with the usual statistics computed from a sample: the sample distribution function, the sample moments, the sample quantiles, the order statistics. Properties, such as asymptotic normality and almost sure convergence will be derived in the lecture. Afterwards, comes the asymptotics of statistics concocted as transformations of vector of more basic statistics. Next part concerns statistics arising in classical parametric inference and contingency table analysis. These include maximum-likelihood estimates, likelihood-ratio tests, etc. Last part of the course treats U-statistics, statistics obtained as solutions of equations (M-estimates), linear function of order statistics (L-estimates) and rank statistics (R-estimates).

 
Literature: 
Sering R.J. (1980) Approximation Theorems of Mathematical Statistics / Wiley.
 
Exam: 
oral exam
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The course covers a part of mathematical statistics which deals with the limiting behavior of different sample statistics, U-statistics, M-, L- and R-Estimates. This course gives better understanding for the basic tools learned in the elementary Statistics I and II, like Law of Large Numbers, Central Limit Theorem, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Cramer-von-Mises tests, sample mean and sample variance behavior, etc. This course is laying a bridge between the probability theory and the mathematical statistics by manipulating with "probability" theorems to obtain "statistical" theorems. In the first part of the course we discuss basic tools of asymptotic theory in statistics: convergence in distribution, in probability, almost surely, in mean. We also consider main probability limit laws: LLN and CLT. Then we deal with the usual statistics computed from a sample: the sample distribution function, the sample moments, the sample quantiles, the order statistics. Properties, such as asymptotic normality and almost sure convergence will be derived in the lecture. Afterwards, comes the asymptotics of statistics concocted as transformations of vector of more basic statistics. Next part concerns statistics arising in classical parametric inference and contingency table analysis. These include maximum-likelihood estimates, likelihood-ratio tests, etc. Last part of the course treats U-statistics, statistics obtained as solutions of equations (M-estimates), linear function of order statistics (L-estimates) and rank statistics (R-estimates).

Literature:
Sering R.J. (1980) Approximation Theorems of Mathematical Statistics / Wiley.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at SPA 1, R21a
Description:

The course covers a part of mathematical statistics which deals with the limiting behavior of different sample statistics, U-statistics, M-, L- and R-Estimates. This course gives better understanding for the basic tools learned in the elementary Statistics I and II, like Law of Large Numbers, Central Limit Theorem, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Cramer-von-Mises tests, sample mean and sample variance behavior, etc. This course is laying a bridge between probability theory and mathematical statistics by manipulating “probability” theorems to obtain “statistical” theorems.

 

Literature:

R. J. Serfling, Approximation theorems of mathematical statistics, 1980, Wiley series in mathematics.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 112
Friday, 09:00am to Monday, 06:00am
at Zingst, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
Description:

The research seminar takes place every semester in form of a retreat. It provides the possibilty to enlarge upon the methodology previously learnt in our Master classes. It is thus an ideal preparation for writing a Master thesis at our chair. At the beginning of the semester, participants receive research questions from the areas of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, which they will empirically investigate in small, independent research projects. Each participant will write a seminar thesis about his or her research project. Results will be presented and discussed at the seminar retreat at the end of the semester.
Goals: Taking part in this seminar will acquaint students with a deep knowledge on selected aspects of behavioral entrepreneurial decision making, experimental design and innovation processes.
Students know how to develop a research question and to design the respective experimental design or empirical research to solve it. They understand how to conduct a scientific literature search and know how to write and structure a scientific seminar paper. Finally, students are able to present their scientific work and to critically discuss it with the audience.

Please register by sending the filled registration form (attached) to Ute Ottenbreit until March 31, 2019!

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at HU, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

Social or other-regarding preferences refer to preferences of economic agents regarding other people’s outcomes. These preferences can be both benevolent and malevolent, but crucially they differ from selfish preferences without any regard for others. The course provides an introduction to key evidence about the relevance of social preferences in economic interaction as well as the most important theoretical approaches that aim at explaining these results. Most of the discussed evidence will be from controlled laboratory experiments. Critique regarding the relevance of (laboratory) experiments on social preferences will be discussed as well. Apart from methodological critique, experimental studies that critically reflect on prominent papers and research agendas will be presented in order to highlight the relevance of apparent subtleties in experimental design.

Literature:
The course literature consists of a list of journal articles. Some key articles are below, further literature will be announced during the course.

Andreoni, James (1995). Cooperation in Public Goods Experiments: Kindness or Confusion? American Economic Review 85(4), 891-904.
Andreoni, James and John H. Miller (2002). Giving According to GARP: An Experimental Test of the Consistency of Preferences for Altruism. Econometrica 70(2), 737-753.
Bénabou, Roland and Jean Tirole (2006). Incentives and prosocial behavior. American Economic Review 96(5). 1652-1678.
Blanco, Mariana, Dirk Engelmann, and Hans-Theo Normann (2011). A Within-Subject Analysis of Other-Regarding Preferences. Games and Economic Behavior 72(2), 321-338.
Bolton, Gary E. and Axel Ockenfels (2000). ERC: A Theory of Equity, Reciprocity and Competition. American Economic Review 90(1), 166-193.
Dufwenberg, Martin, Paul Heidhues, Georg Kirchsteiger, Frank Riedel, and Joel Sobel (2011). Other-Regarding Preferences in General Equilibrium. Review of Economic Studies 78(2), 613-639.
Engelmann, Dirk and Martin Strobel (2004). Inequality Aversion, Effciency, and Maximin Preferences in Simple Distribution Experiments. American Economic Review 94(4), 857-869.
Fehr, Ernst and Simon Gächter (2000). Cooperation and Punishment in Public Goods Experiments. American Economic Review 90(4), 980-994.
Fehr, Ernst and Klaus M. Schmidt (1999). A Theory of Fairness, Competition and Cooperation. Quarterly Journal of Economics 114(3), 817-868.
Levitt, Steven D. and List, John A. (2007). What Do Laboratory Experiments Measuring Social Preferences Reveal About the Real World? Journal of Economic Perspectives 21(2), 153-174.
Nikiforakis, Nikos, 2008. Punishment and Counter-punishment in Public Good Games: Can we Really Govern Ourselves? Journal of Public Economics 92(1-2), 91-112.

Early relevant surveys are provided in:
Camerer, Colin F. (2003). Behavioral Game Theory, Princeton University Press. Chapter 2
Ledyard, John (1995): Public Goods: A Survey of Experiment Research. In: John H. Kagel and Alvin E. Roth, Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton University Press.

Exam:
written exam

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

Social or other-regarding preferences refer to preferences of economic agents regarding other people’s outcomes. These preferences can be both benevolent and malevolent, but crucially they differ from selfish preferences without any regard for others. The course provides an introduction to key evidence about the relevance of social preferences in economic interaction as well as the most important theoretical approaches that aim at explaining these results.
Most of the discussed evidence will be from controlled laboratory experiments. Critique regarding the relevance of (laboratory) experiments on social preferences will be discussed as well. Apart from methodological critique, experimental studies that critically reflect on prominent papers and research agendas will be presented in order to highlight the relevance of apparent subtleties in experimental design.
Specific requirements:
Some knowledge of game theory is helpful, but fairly basic experience is mostly sufficient. Knowledge of statistical analysis will make it easier to follow the data analysis in the experimental papers and thus enable a more critical view, but is not strictly necessary.

Literature:
The course literature consists of a list of journal articles. Some key articles are below, further literature will be announced during the course.
Andreoni, James (1995). Cooperation in Public Goods Experiments: Kindness or Confusion? American Economic Review 85(4),
891-904.
Andreoni, James and John H. Miller (2002). Giving According to GARP: An Experimental Test of the Consistency of Preferences for Altruism. Econometrica 70(2), 737-753.
Bénabou, Roland and Jean Tirole (2006). Incentives and prosocial behavior. American Economic Review 96(5). 1652-1678.
Blanco, Mariana, Dirk Engelmann, and Hans-Theo Normann (2011). A Within-Subject Analysis of Other-Regarding Preferences. Games and Economic Behavior 72(2), 321-338.
Bolton, Gary E. and Axel Ockenfels (2000). ERC: A Theory of Equity, Reciprocity and Competition. American Economic Review 90(1), 166-193.
Dufwenberg, Martin, Paul Heidhues, Georg Kirchsteiger, Frank Riedel, and Joel Sobel (2011). Other-Regarding Preferences in General Equilibrium. Review of Economic Studies 78(2), 613-639.
Engelmann, Dirk and Martin Strobel (2004). Inequality Aversion, Effciency, and Maximin Preferences in Simple Distribution Experiments. American Economic Review 94(4), 857-869.
Fehr, Ernst and Simon Gächter (2000). Cooperation and Punishment in Public Goods Experiments. American Economic Review 90(4), 980-994.
Fehr, Ernst and Klaus M. Schmidt (1999). A Theory of Fairness, Competition and Cooperation. Quarterly Journal of Economics 114(3), 817-868.
Levitt, Steven D. and List, John A. (2007). What Do Laboratory Experiments Measuring Social Preferences Reveal About the Real World? Journal of Economic Perspectives 21(2), 153-174.
Nikiforakis, Nikos, 2008. Punishment and Counter-punishment in Public Good Games: Can we Really Govern Ourselves? Journal of Public Economics 92(1-2), 91-112.
Early relevant surveys are provided in:
• Camerer, Colin F. (2003). Behavioral Game Theory, Princeton University Press. Chapter 2
• Ledyard, John (1995): Public Goods: A Survey of Experiment Research. In: John H. Kagel and Alvin E. Roth, Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton University Press.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 04:00pm at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 22
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course communicates how to develop data science applications that comply to the FAIR principles of open science. That means that they are findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. After this course, participants should

  • be able to use common collaboration tools in software development like Git and Github,
  • understand how to use functional and object-oriented programming approaches to develop accessible code,
  • be capable to develop test routines and debug code,
  • have gained an understanding on how to profile code,
  • have developed routines for standard data analysis tasks, like data scraping, cleaning and visualization, and
  • have understood how to package statistical applications so that they are portable across platforms.

While this course is targeted at incoming doctoral researchers of the TRR 266 “Accounting for Transparency”, non TRR members at the doctoral and master level are free to attend, capacity permitting. Please apply by September 2nd by sending an email including a brief CV and your current transcript to gassen@wiwi.hu-berlin.de. Students will be informed about their acceptance by September 4th.

More information on the course can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at SPA1, R21b
Description:

The course offers an overview of advanced statistical methods in quantitative finance and insurance which should be comprehensible for a graduate student in financial engineering as well as for an inexperienced newcomer who wants to get a grip on advanced statistical tools applied in these fields.

Literature:
− Cizek, Härdle, Weron (2011) "Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance" 2nd ed., Springer Verlag.
− Franke, Härdle, Hafner (2011) "Statistics of Financial Markets", 3rd ed.,Springer Verlag.
− Härdle, Hautsch, Overbeck (2009) "Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed.,Springer Verlag.
− Härdle, Simar (2012) "Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis", 3rd ed., Springer Verlag.
− Gentle, Härdle, Mori (2012) "Handbook of Computational Statistics, Concepts and Methods", 2nd ed., Springer Verlag.
− Klugman, Panjer and Willmot (1998) "Loss Models: From Data to Decisions", Joh Wiley & Sons.

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday, 10:15am at Spandauer Str. 1, R 21a
Description:

The course offers an overview of advanced statistical methods in quantitative finance and insurance which should be comprehensible for a graduate student in financial engineering as well as for an inexperienced newcomer who wants to get a grip on advanced statistical tools applied in these fields.

   

Literature:

-      Cizek, Härdle, Weron (2011): Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag.

-      Franke, Härdle, Hafner (2011): Statistics of Financial Markets. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag.

-      Härdle, Hautsch, Overbeck (2009): Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag.

-      Härdle, Simar (2012): Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag.

-      Gentle, Härdle, Mori (2012): Handbook of Computational Statistics, Concepts and Methods. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag.

-      Klugman, Panjer and Willmot (1998): Loss Models: From Data to Decisions. Joh Wiley & Sons.

   

Exam: Oral exam

 

 

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21b
Description:

The course offers an overview of advanced statistical methods in quantitative finance and insurance which should be comprehensible for a graduate student in financial engineering as well as for an inexperienced newcomer who wants to get a grip on advanced statistical tools applied in these fields.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The course offers an overview of advanced statistical methods in quantitative finance and insurance which should be comprehensible for a graduate student in financial engineering as well as for an inexperienced newcomer who wants to get a grip on advanced statistical tools applied in these fields.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Spandauer Str. 1, rom 21a
Description:

The course offers an overview of advanced statistical methods in quantitative finance and insurance which should be comprehensible for a graduate student in financial engineering as well as for an inexperienced newcomer who wants to get a grip on advanced statistical tools applied in these fields.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, stochastic processes in discrete time are presented and the Wiener process is introduced. Itô's Lemma is derived and the Black-Scholes (BS) Option model is presented leading to the analytic solution for the BS Option price. Numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree constructions are discussed in detail.
Literature:

Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2011) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-16520-7 (599 p)
Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)
Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908-4 (816 p)
Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2007) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 3-540-72243-4 (456 p)
Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
04:00pm to 08:00pm
at SPA1, R23
Description:

Learn from Nobel price winners, such as Engle (ARCH Models, 2003), Scholes, Merton, (Derivative Valuation, 1997) or Modigliani (Financial Markets Analysis, 1985) to understand statistics of financial markets!

The class is addressed to students with excellent knowledge of multivariate statistics and students with good skills in statistical software. This course is a starting point for students interested in quantitative finance and students with ambitions to work in the derivative, investment and risk-control departments. Former students of this course work for example at Deutsche Bank, Sal. Oppenheim, Citigroup, European Central Bank, BAFin, KPMG, Nadler Company and many international universities.

Literature:
− Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2015) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 4th ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-54538-2 (555 p)
− Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)
− Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908- 4 (816 p)
− Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2015) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 4th ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-662-45170-0 (580 p)
− Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

Exam: Oral exam

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday,
04:15pm to 07:45pm
at Spandauer Str. 1, R 23
Description:

Description of the course:

Learn from Nobel prize winners, such as Engle (ARCH Models, 2003), Scholes, Merton, (Derivative Valuation, 1997) or Modigliani (Financial Markets Analysis, 1985) to understand statistics of financial markets!

The class is addressed to students with excellent knowledge of multivariate statistics and students with good skills in statistical software. This course is a starting point for students interested in quantitative finance and students with ambitions to work in the derivative, investment and risk-control departments. Former students of this course work for example at Deutsche Bank, Sal. Oppenheim, Citigroup, European Central Bank, BAFin, KPMG, Nadler Company and many international universities.

   

Literature:

-      Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2011): Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-16520-7 (599 p)

-      Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009): Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)

-      Hull (2005): Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908- 4 (816 p)

-      Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2007): Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 3-540-72243-4 (456 p)

-      Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011): Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

   

Exam: Oral exam (70%) and presentation (30%)

 

 

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
04:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1
Description:

Learn from Nobel price winners, such as Engle (ARCH Models, 2003), Scholes, Merton, (Derivative Valuation, 1997) or Modigliani (Financial Markets Analysis, 1985) to understand statistics of financial markets! The class is addressed to students with excellent knowledge of multivariate statistics and students with good skills in statistical software. This course is a starting point for students interested in quantitative finance and students with ambitions to work in the derivative, investment and risk-control departments. Former students of this course work for example at Deutsche Bank, Sal. Oppenheim, Citigroup, European Central Bank, BAFin, KPMG, Nadler Company and many international universities.

Literature: 
-       Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2011) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-16520-7 (599 p)
-       Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)
-       Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908- 4 (816 p)
-       Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2007) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 3-540-72243-4 (456 p)
-       Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

Exam:Oral exam

 

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday,
04:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, stochastic processes in discrete time are presented and the Wiener process is introduced. Itô's Lemma is derived and the Black-Scholes (BS) Option model is presented leading to the analytic solution for the BS Option price. Numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree constructions are discussed in detail.

Literature:

Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2011) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-16520-7 (599 p)
Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)
Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908-4 (816 p)
Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2007) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 3-540-72243-4 (456 p)
Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

Exam:
oral

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
04:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, stochastic processes in discrete time are presented and the Wiener process is introduced. Itô's Lemma is derived and the Black-Scholes (BS) Option model is presented leading to the analytic solution for the BS Option price. Numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree constructions are discussed in detail.

Literature: 
  • Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2011) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-16520-7 (599 p)
  • Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)
  • Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908-4 (816 p)
  • Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2007) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 3-540-72243-4 (456 p)
  • Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)
Exam: 
oral
Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at SPA1, room 23
Description:

Please register in the respective Moodle course, see http://lvb.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/Teaching_Moodle

In the second part (Statistics of Financial Markets II), the course focuses on quantitative methods in risk management such as Value at Risk (VaR) and backtesting. The implications of the current Basel II directive to the risk management of the financial institution are discussed. The students will be equipped with the knowledge of the standard time-series models ARMA, unit-root tests, ARCH and GARCH models that are essential for understanding the standard risk-management models e.g. Risk Metrics methodology. The advanced statistical methods based on the Copulae dependence concept, Extreme Values, Neural Networks as well nonparametric and adaptive methods are introduced and applied to the risk management problems.

Literature:
Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2011) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-16520-7 (599 p)
Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)
Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908-4 (816 p)
Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2007) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 3-540-72243-4 (456 p)
Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

Exam: oral exam (70%) and presentation (30%)

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

Learn from Nobel prize winners, such as Engle (ARCH Models, 2003), Scholes, Merton, (Derivative Valuation, 1997) or Modigliani (Financial Markets Analysis, 1985) to understand statistics of financial markets!
The class is addressed to students with excellent knowledge of multivariate statistics and students with good skills in statistical software. This course is a starting point for students interested in quantitative finance and students with ambitions to work in the derivative, investment and risk-control departments. Former students of this course work for example at Deutsche Bank, Sal. Oppenheim, Citigroup, European Central Bank, BAFin, KPMG, Nadler Company and many international universities.

Literature:
Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2015) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 4th ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-54538-2 (555 p)

Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)

Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908- 4 (816 p)

Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2015) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 4th extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-662-45170-0 (580 p)

Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

www.quantlet.de

Exam: Oral Exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
11:15am to 12:45pm
at HU Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 26, Raum 0110
Wednesday,
11:15am to 12:45pm
at HU Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 26, Raum 0110
Description:

This course is held in German.

Voraussetzungen: Analysis I und II, Lineare Algebra und Analytische Geometrie I und II. Empfohlen werden die maßtheoretischen Grundlagen aus Analysis III.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
09:00am to 11:00am
at Vorlesung: HU Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 25, Raum 1.013
Friday,
09:00am to 11:00am
at Vorlesung: HU Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 25, Raum 1.013
Tuesday,
11:00am to 01:00pm
at Übung: HU Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 25, Raum 3.007
Description:

Note: This course is held in German.

Kursinhalte:
Zufällige Versuche und Wahrscheinlichkeitsräume, Zufallsgrößen und zufällige Vektoren, ihre Verteilungsfunktionen und ihre Momente, Unabhängigkeit, Korrelation, bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeiten, charakteristische Funktionen, Summen unabhängiger Zufallsgrößen, Gesetze der großen Zahlen, Zentrale Grenzwertsätze, Hauptsatz der Mathematischen Statistik (Gliwenko-Cantelli), Elemente der Schätz- und Testtheorie.

Oben vermerkte Zeiten sind die der Vorlesung und einer von drei möglichen Übungen. Für die anderen Übungstermine bitte AGNES konsultieren.


Prüfung:
Maximal dreistündige Klausur oder halbstündige mündliche Prüfung. Zulassungsvoraussetzung für die Prüfung: Übungsschein Stochastik I

 

Credits:
10.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Please note: This course is held in German and it is organized by the Department of Mathematics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.
Einführung in die zur Analyse zufälliger Erscheinungen entwickelten mathematischen Ideen und Methoden, Gesetze der großen Zahlen und zentrale Grenzwertsätze, Elemente der Mathematischen Statistik.

Literature:
Georgii, H.-O. (2007). Stochastik, De Gruyter Verlag
Klenke, A. (2008). Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie, Springer
Elstrodt, J. (2007). Maß- und Integrationstheorie, Springer

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Standards and standardisation are ubiquitous. Successful examples are mobile telephones, which experienced rapid diffusion in Europe by benefiting from the timely release of the GSM standard, and laser technology, for which the German industry via early standardisation achieved a leading position both in Europe and worldwide.

We are aware of some of these standards like standardised paper sizes, standards in the www, plugs and sockets of electronic equipment, bolts matching nuts etc.. Other standards we may not be aware of like standards for the height of steps on a flight of stairs or standards for the safety of playground equipment.

Even though we might not be aware of all types of standards they both have an impact on our modern life and at the same time are important tools of strategic entrepreneurship as well as relevant for industry at large, policy and society.

In this respect, the relevance of standards can take many forms. Some are elements of the technical infrastructure of our society. Other standards facilitate the exchange of goods and services. Yet other standards provide users with a common terminology or accepted aspects of measuring and testing. Standardisation can be a channel of knowledge and technology transfer. Standards can contribute to the integration of economic areas, like the Single European Market, via their integration into the European health, environmental and safety regulations. Maybe most important from an economic and business perspective and at the same time surely the least understood aspect of standards and standardisation is their relationship to innovation. The reason for the lack of understanding of this relationship is mainly due to the fact that standards do not automatically spur innovation. Rather, certain aspects of standards can have a beneficial effect while others might hold the danger of reducing innovation. The discipline of standardisation research can provide valuable insights into this relationship and help to strengthen the positive aspects of standards and standardisation.

This series of introductory lectures will cover the topic of standards and standardisation from a holistic perspective integrating findings from the field of standardisation research on the relation of standards and innovation, the role of standards in innovation policy as well as practical knowledge about standards, standardisation and of standardisation work into a coherent curriculum. Students passing this curriculum will have a better understanding not only of the economic theories behind standards and standardisation but also will have a better understanding of how standards have an impact on the microlevel of companies, the macrolevel of the national, European and global innovation landscape, the relevance of standards in innovation policy or R&D policy and the relation between standadisation and regulation. Moreover, students will be introduced to the different institutions that make up the vast standardisation landscape at the national, European and international level, how these levels and institutions interact, which rules govern standardisation and how both public and private stakeholders can participate in successful standardisation work.

Lecture Schedule
Strategic Standardization

Date
Topic and Lecturer
15/04/2014
Introductory session, 09.00 - 10.00 a.m., Room EB 202
16/04/2014
Introduction (Blind/Mangelsdorf)
23/04/2014
Standardization System (Krukenberg)
30/04/2014
Standardization Process (Krukenberg)
07/05/2014
Standards Consortia and Fora (Pohlmann)
14/05/2014
Private Standards (Großmann)
21/05/2014
Quality Infrastructure (Denkler/Mangelsdorf)
28/05/2014
Reserach, Innovation and Standardization (Blind)
04/06/2014
IPR and Standardization (Pohlmann)
11/06/2014
Macroeconomic Impacts (Mangelsdorf)
18/06/2014
Microeconomic Impacts (Blind)
25/06/2014
Standardization Strategies (Mangelsdorf)
02/07/2014
Standardization Foresight (Blind)
01/07/2014
Standardization Policy (Blind), Exam Preparation
tba/07/2013
Exam, Room tba

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Lecture: 12-2pm
Tutorial: 4-6pm

The lecture introduces standardization as a strategic tool in the economy and society, e.g. reducing barriers to trade, for the marketability of innovations and relieving governmental regulation. The relationship between standards and patents and the strategic options for their application are explained. Business and economic benefits of standardization are described and explained using a variety of examples.

Experts of standardization processes (business, academic, public authorities) are integrated as guest speakers in the lecture. Upon passing the exam the student receives the publicly recognized DIN Certification "Normungsexperte" (Modul 1). Short introduction to the topic: Tuesday, April 9th, 2013, 09:00 - 10:00, room EB 202.

Literature:
1 written exam at the end of the semester

Tutorial:
Gather practical experiences: Participate in events of DIN (workshops, seminars, conferences) and sessions of technical committees (national, European and international) in standardization.

Four block courses (some half day and some full day) once a month (October 2013 - February 2014) after deciding on topics and dates, including generation of a report. A broad variety of topics and dates from the standardization sessions are available.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
02:30pm to 05:30pm
at DIW
Description:

Course objectives:

Covers statistical methods relevant for the analysis of data based on structural economic models
• Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important.
• Focus on discrete choice methods for cross section and panel data
• Provide insights into strategy (especially, identification) in important papers in structural Labour, Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.
• Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as simulation, numerical integration and discretisation; coding best-practice using Matlab, such as loops vs. vectorisation, readability vs. speed, and sustainable coding for several projects.
• The aim is to equip students with skills allowing them to carry out independent empirical research

Course organization:

• Part I is taught by Daniel Kemptner, Part II by Peter Haan, Luke Haywood, and Hannes Ullrich.
• Credit points: 12 ECTS. 5 sessions in Part I, 8 sessions in Part II. Both parts must be completed to gain credits.
• Prerequisites: skills in advanced econometric methods (Master or Ph.D. level)
• All sessions in this course take place at DIW.
• First session: 20.4.2017
• Final session: 20.7.2017 (Exam)

Credits:
12.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
02:30pm to 05:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr.58, Friedensburg Raum 22008
Description:

This course takes place on each Wednesday at DIW from May 13 to July 15, 14:30-17:30 o'clock. It discusses advantages and limitations of structural econometric models to give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important. It also provides insights into strategy in important papers in structural Labor, Public and IO literature and establishes basic estimation techniques and numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation. Besides of that, the course provides introduction to the matrix programming language MatLab.

Please note, that as of May 18th there is a new version of the syllabus uploaded.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
02:30pm to 05:30pm
at Friedensburg Room 2.2.008, DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58
Description:

Course objectives:

Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding
of why and when adding structure is important.

Provide insights into strategy (especially, identi cation) in important papers in structural Labour,
Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.

Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration
and Discretisation.

Provide introduction to the matrix programming language Matlab. Loops vs. vectorisation; read-
ability vs. speed; sustainable coding for several projects

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
02:30pm to 05:30pm
at DIW, Mohrenstraße 58, Room 2.2.008 (Friedensburg)
Description:

Course objectives:

  • Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important.
  • Provide insights into strategy (especially, identification) in important papers in structural Labour, Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.
  • Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation.
  • Develop matrix programming skills using Matlab. Loops vs. vectorisation; readability vs. speed; sustainable coding for several projects.

More information can be found in the course syllabus.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:30pm to 05:30pm
at DIW, Room 3.3.002A (Schmoller)
Description:

Course objectives
- Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important.
- Provide insights into strategy (especially, identification) in important papers in structural Labour, Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.
- Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation.
- Develop matrix programming skills using Matlab. Loops vs. vectorisation; readability vs. speed; sustainable coding for several projects.

For further details, please see the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 05:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58, Karl Popper Room
Description:

This is the first course of a sequence of two courses on structural econometrics offered by the DIW Graduate Center. It focuses on discrete choice models for cross section and panel data. It covers simulation-based estimation techniques such as Maximum Simulated Likelihood (MSL), Method of Simulated Moments (MSM), and Indirect Inference. Applied papers from the fields of labour economics, health economics, industrial organization, and behavioral economics will be discussed. Exercises will include the use of a software package (Matlab). The aim is to equip students with skills allowing them to carry out independent empirical research.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 05:30pm
at DIW
Description:

Course objectives:
- This is the first course of a sequence of two courses on structural econometrics offered by the DIW Graduate Center
- Focuses on discrete choice models for cross section and panel data
- Covers simulation-based estimation techniques such as Maximum Simulated Likelihood (MSL), Method of Simulated Moments (MSM), and Indirect Inference
- Applied papers from the fields of labour economics, health economics, industrial organization, and behavioral economics will be discussed
- Exercises will include the use of a software package (Matlab)
- The aim is to equip students with skills allowing them to carry out independent empirical research

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday,
09:00am to 12:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin, Elinor Ostrom Hall 1.2.019 except: 16.05. Friedensburg Room 2.3.001, 17.05. & 23.05. Schwartz Room 5.2.010
Description:

Course contents:

  1. Vector Autoregressive Models
  2. Vector Error Correction Models
  3. Structural VAR Tools
  4. Bayesian VAR Analysis
  5. Identification by Short-Run Restrictions
  6. Identification by Long-Run Restrictions
  7. Inference for Impulse Responses
  8. Sign Restrictions
  9. Identification by Heteroskedasticity or Non-Gaussianity
  10. Identification Based on External Instruments
  11. Structural VAR Analysis in a Data-Rich Environment
  12. Nonfundamental Shocks

Literature:
Lutz Kilian and Helmut Lütkepohl (2017), Structural Vector Autoregressive Analysis, Cambridge University Press.
Helmut Lütkepohl (2005), New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer-Verlag.

Time:
16 × 90 min lectures during the period 13-24 May 2019

The grade for the course will be based on a paper which is due shortly after the end of the course. Details will be announced in class.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday, 02:15pm at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Lecture Hall 104a
Description:

The course “Taxation” consists of a lecture (2 class hours) and problem class (1 class hour) covering the economics of taxation. The course is primarily concerned with the microeconomic theory of taxation.

We cover the following topics:
• Fundamentals of Taxation
• Taxation and Labor Supply
• The Excess Burden of Taxation
• Tax Incidence
• Optimal Direct Taxation
• Optimal Indirect Taxation
• The Effects of Taxation on Savings
• Taxation and Risk Taking
• Taxation and Investment
• Taxation and Capital Structure
• Tax Evasion

Literature:
• Textbook: Salanié, Bernard (2011): "The Economics of Taxation", 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
• Further literature will be announced in class.

Exam:
Participants take a final written exam (120 minutes). In addition, PhD students are required to write a term paper (theoretical or empirical).

Dates and Venue:
The lecture and problem class take place in Lecture Hall B, Henry Ford Building, Garystr. 35-37, in the first seven weeks of the summer term (20.4.-2.6.16).
Problem class: Wednesday 16:15-17:45,
Lecture: Thursday 14:15-17:30.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Lecture Hall 104a
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Lecture Hall 104a
Description:

The course “Taxation” consists of a lecture (2 class hours) and problem class (1 class hour) as well as a literature reading class (1 class hour) about the economics of taxation. The lecture and problem class are primarily concerned with the microeconomic theory of taxation, e.g., optimal taxation theory. In the reading class, selected topics in the economics of taxation are further explored. We discuss theoretical as well as empirical papers.

The lecture and problem class cover the following topics:
• Fundamentals of Taxation
• Taxation and Labor Supply
• The Excess Burden of Taxation
• Tax Incidence
• Optimal Direct Taxation
• Optimal Indirect Taxation
• The Effects of Taxation on Savings
• Taxation and Risk Taking
• Taxation and Investment
• Taxation and Capital Structure
• Tax Evasion

Textbook:
• Salanié, Bernard (2011): "The Economics of Taxation", 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Reading list (examples):
• Atkinson, Anthony B. and Joseph E. Stiglitz (1976): The design of tax structure: Direct versus indirect taxation. Journal of Public Economics 6.1-2, 55-75.
• Bach, Stefan, Giacomo Corneo, and Viktor Steiner (2012): Optimal top marginal tax rates under income splitting for couples. European Economic Review 56, 1055-1069.
• Blundell, Richard, Mike Brewer, Peter Haan, and Andrew Shephard (2009): Optimal Income Taxation of Lone Mothers: An Empirical Comparison of the UK and Germany. Economic Journal 119.535, F101-F121.
• Cullen, Julie Berry, and Roger H. Gordon (2007): Taxes and entrepreneurial risk-taking: Theory and evidence for the US. Journal of Public Economics 91.7, 1479-1505.
• Dwenger, Nadja, and Viktor Steiner (2012): Profit taxation and the elasticity of the corporate income tax base. Evidence from German corporate tax return data. National Tax Journal 65.1, 117-150.
• Fossen, Frank M. (2009): Would a flat-rate tax stimulate entrepreneurship in Germany? A behavioural microsimulation analysis allowing for risk. Fiscal Studies 30.2, 179-218.
• Gentry, William M., and R. Glenn Hubbard (2000): Tax policy and entrepreneurial entry. American Economic Review 90.2, 283-287.
• Gruber, Jon and Emmanuel Saez (2002): The elasticity of taxable income: Evidence and implications. Journal of Public Economics 84, 1-32.
• Piketty, Thomas, and Emmanuel Saez (2013): A theory of optimal inheritance taxation. Econometrica 81.5, 1851-1886.
• Poterba, James M., and Andrew A. Samwick (2003): Taxation and household portfolio composition: US evidence from the 1980s and 1990s. Journal of Public Economics 87.1, 5-38.
• Saez, Emmanuel (2001): Using elasticities to derive optimal income tax rates. Review of Economic Studies 68.1, 205-229.
• Saez, Emmanuel (2002): The desirability of commodity taxation under non-linear income taxation and heterogeneous tastes. Journal of Public Economics 83.2 217-230.
• Wen, Jean-Francois, and Daniel V. Gordon (2013): An empirical model of tax convexity and self-employment. Forthcoming in: Review of Economics and Statistics, doi:10.1162/REST_a_00388.

Exam:
Participants take a final written exam (120 minutes). In addition, PhD students present research articles and actively participate in the discussions in the reading class. The written exam accounts for 2/3 and the presentation and class participation for 1/3 of the grade.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at FU, Garystr. 21, Lecture hall 104a (April 17, May 8 and 29: 102!)
Thursday,
10:15am to 11:45pm
at FU, Garystr. 21, Lecture hall 104a
Description:

• Fundamentals of Taxation
• Taxation and Labor Supply
• The Excess Burden of Taxation
• Tax Incidence
• Optimal Direct Taxation
• Optimal Indirect Taxation
• The Effects of Taxation on Savings
• Taxation and Risk Taking
• Taxation and Investment
• Taxation and Capital Structure
• Tax Evasion

Literature:
• Salanié, Bernard (2011): "The Economics of Taxation", 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
• Further literature references will be provided during class.

Exam:
Final written exam.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

the tutorial is Monday from 10-12 and the lecture from 14-16

Content:The Economics of Climate Change is an introductory course into economic assessment of climate change impacts and optimal mitigation and adaptation response. Welfare-economic concepts such as cost-benefit analysis, discounting, intergenerational equity, non-market valuation are applied to understand the impact of climate change and mitigation on long-term welfare and growth.
·         Topics: Along the lines of the Stern Review and the IPCC fifth assessment report, we provide a systematic overview of the relevant issues in climate change economics.
This includes, inter alia:
·         physics of climate change: global warming, radiative forcing, greenhouse gases, feedbacks, carbon cycle, uncertainties and projections
·         climate change impacts on biological and human systems, vulnerability, adaptive capacity, tipping points
·         social cost-benefit analysis, market and non-market valuation of impacts, discounting, and its ethical implications for inter-generational equity
·         stock pollutants: the atmosphere as a limited disposal space for greenhouse gases
·         macroeconomic modeling approaches to assess the costs of climate stabilization
·         concepts of social welfare
·         the interrelation between climate change and economic development and growth
·         theories of economic growth, such as the Solow and Ramsey growth models
·         Hotellig’s rule for optimal resource extraction
·         mitigation options in different sectors, including land and bioenergy, cities and transport, power generation and variable renewables

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00am
at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room tba
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00am
at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room H 0107
Description:

The Economics of Climate Change is an introductory course into the economic assessment of climate change impacts and optimal mitigation and adaptation response. Welfare-economic concepts such as cost-benefit analysis, (inter-generational) discounting, non-market valuation, and different concepts of social welfare are applied to understand the impact of climate change and climate change mitigation on long-term welfare and growth. Since these concepts can be applied to many public policy problems, the course is also an introduction into intertemporal welfare theory and public economics.

The Economics of Climate Change is taught in the summer semester. In the winter semester, there is a complementary course on The Economics of Climate Policy. That course takes a decentralized policy perspective, discussing incentives, policy instruments, and game theory.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at tba
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at tba
Description:

The Economics of Climate Policy is an introductory course into the economics of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies. Essentially, the mitigation of climate change is a global public good, posing policy challenges both at the national level (within countries) as well as at the international level (between countries). In the course, concepts such as market failures, externalities, and Pigouvian taxes are developed and applied to climate change. Game theory will be introduced to understand the challenges in international climate negotiations. The history and status quo of international negotiations will be reviewed, as well as implementation policies such as the EU ETS and Germany’s Energiewende. Since these concepts can be applied to many public policy problems, the course is also an introduction into allocation theory, environmental economics, public finance and game theory.

Topics:
Starting from the perspective of decentralized decision making and coordination, we provide a systematic overview of the relevant issues in climate change policy. This includes, inter alia:

  • Climate change as a market failure: externalities and public goods, internalization options such as Pigouvian tax and cap and trade systems (prices vs. quantities), policy instrument design
  • Game theory, behavioral economics and Elinor Ostrom’s approaches to governing commons
  • The international politics of climate change: the history and status quo of UNFCCC climate negotiations from Rio to Kyoto and Paris, incentives for countries to reduce emissions: co-benefits, double dividend, and climate agreements
  • Climate policies today: The European Union Emission Trading scheme (EU ETS), Germany’s Energiewende, and the U.S. EPA Clean Power Plan

Literature:

Obligatory readings (along with the course)

  • Perman et al.: Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Pearson.
  • Stern Review, part IV – VI
  • IPCC AR5 WG III, chapters 13-15
  • Edenhofer et al.: The Atmosphere as a Global Common - Challenges for International Cooperation and Governance, Handbook of the Macroeconomics of Global Warming
  • A number of specific articles will be distributed during the semester. Students are expected to read about one paper per week.

Recommended readings (to prepare for the course)

  • Fudenberg & Tirole: Game theory, MIT Press.
  • The timeline of UNFCCC climate negotiations.

Exam:

Students will be graded based on weekly problem sets (homework assignments) and a written mid-term exam. There is no final exam. Ph.D. students will be asked to take an oral exam in addition to the assignments and the mid-term exam.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at tba
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at tba
Description:

The Economics of Climate Policy is an introductory course into the economics of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies. Essentially, the mitigation of climate change is a global public good, posing policy challenges both at the national level (within countries) as well as at the international level (between countries). In the course, concepts such as market failures, externalities, and Pigouvian taxes are developed and applied to climate change. Game theory will be introduced to understand the challenges in international climate negotiations. The history and status quo of international negotiations will be reviewed, as well as implementation policies such as the EU ETS and Germany’s Energiewende. Since these concepts can be applied to many public policy problems, the course is also an introduction into allocation theory, environmental economics, public finance and game theory.

Topics:
Starting from the perspective of decentralized decision making and coordination, we provide a systematic overview of the relevant issues in climate change policy. This includes, inter alia:

  • Climate change as a market failure: externalities and public goods, internalization options such as Pigouvian tax and cap and trade systems (prices vs. quantities), policy instrument design
  • Game theory, behavioral economics and Elinor Ostrom’s approaches to governing commons
  • The international politics of climate change: the history and status quo of UNFCCC climate negotiations from Rio to Kyoto and Paris, incentives for countries to reduce emissions: co-benefits, double dividend, and climate agreements
  • Climate policies today: The European Union Emission Trading scheme (EU ETS), Germany’s Energiewende, and the U.S. EPA Clean Power Plan

Literature:

Obligatory readings (along with the course)

  • Perman et al.: Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Pearson.
  • Stern Review, part IV – VI
  • IPCC AR5 WG III, chapters 13-15
  • Edenhofer et al.: The Atmosphere as a Global Common - Challenges for International Cooperation and Governance, Handbook of the Macroeconomics of Global Warming
  • A number of specific articles will be distributed during the semester. Students are expected to read about one paper per week.

Recommended readings (to prepare for the course)

  • Fudenberg & Tirole: Game theory, MIT Press.
  • The timeline of UNFCCC climate negotiations.

Exam:

Students will be graded based on weekly problem sets (homework assignments) and a written mid-term exam. There is no final exam. Ph.D. students will be asked to take an oral exam in addition to the assignments and the mid-term exam.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday, 02:00pm at Eugene-Oaul-Wigner-Gebäude - EW 201
Monday, 10:00am at Hauptgebäude TU - H 0106
Description:

The Economics of Climate Policy is an introductory course into the economics of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies. Essentially, the mitigation of climate change is a global public good, posing policy challenges both at the national level (within countries) as well as at the international level (between countries). In the course, concepts such as market failures, externalities, and Pigouvian taxes are developed and applied to climate change. Game theory will be introduced to understand the challenges in international climate negotiations. The history and status quo of international negotiations will be reviewed, as well as implementation policies such as the EU ETS and Germany’s Energiewende. Since these concepts can be applied to many public policy problems, the course is also an introduction into allocation theory, environmental economics, public finance and game theory.

Grading: Students will be graded based on weekly problem sets (homework assignments) and a mid-term exam; there is no final exam. Make sure you attend the course from the beginning on, as we start with assignments immediately. Ph.D. students will be asked to write a term paper in addition to the assignments.

Schedule: The lecture takes place Fridays 2-4 pm; the tutorial Modays 10 am-12pm.

Please see the attached syllabus for more detailed information on course details and the schedule.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA1, R22
Description:

Search and matching frictions as a fundamental defining attribute of labor markets. Introduction to search theory in partial equilibrium. On-the-job search and wage distributions in general equilibrium. Models of wage-posting. Jovanovic's model. Incorporation of search-matching frameworks in general equilibrium models: Diamond, Mortensen/Pissarides, and other macro models. Implications for labor market institutions.

Literature: Specialized Literature, Skript
Exam: Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 06:00pm
at - 22 Spandauer Straße 1 (SPA 1) - (Seminar- und Unterrichtsraum)
Description:

Search and matching frictions as a fundamental defining attribute of labor markets. Introduction to search theory in partial equilibrium. On-the-job search and wage distributions in general equilibrium. Models of wage-posting. Jovanovic's model. Incorporation of search-matching frameworks in general equilibrium models: Diamond, Mortensen/Pissarides, and other macro models. Implications for labor market institutions.

Specialization "Labor Economics" 2nd year

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The course reviews the main topics and models of the incentive theory. It focuses on the principal-agent paradigm where the principal delegates an action to a single agent through the take-it-or-leave-it offer of a contract. Major topics are represented by the problem of adverse selection, which occurs when the agent learns some piece of information relevant to the contractual relationship, and the problem of moral hazard, which appears as soon as the agent’s actions are not observable. First, the trade-offs that emerge in these contexts are characterized: the rent extraction-efficiency trade-off under adverse selection and the trade-offs between the extraction of limited liability rent and efficiency and also between insurance and efficiency under moral hazard. Then, extensions of the basic framework to more complex environments are discussed. Mixed models with adverse selection, moral hazard and nonverifiability of the state of the world are also treated. Principal-agent models with adverse selection and moral hazard are finally considered in a dynamic context.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The course reviews the main topics and models of the incentive theory. It focuses on the principal-agent paradigm where the principal delegates an action to a single agent through the take-it-or-leave-it offer of a contract. Major topics are represented by the problem of adverse selection, which occurs when the agent learns some piece of information relevant to the contractual relationship, and the problem of moral hazard, which appears as soon as the agent’s actions are not observable. First, the trade-offs that emerge in these contexts are characterized: the rent extraction-efficiency trade-off under adverse selection and the trade-offs between the extraction of limited liability rent and efficiency and also between insurance and efficiency under moral hazard. Then, extensions of the basic framework to more complex environments are discussed. Mixed models with adverse selection, moral hazard and nonverifiability of the state of the world are also treated. Principal-agent models with adverse selection and moral hazard are finally considered in a dynamic context.

Literature:
Laffont/Martimore, "The Theory of Incentives: The Principal-Agent Model", 2001
Bolton/Dewatripont, "Contract Theory", 2005
Salanié, "The Economics of Contracts", 2005
Macho-Stadler, Perez-Castrillo, "An Introduction to the Economics of Information: Incentives and Contracts", 2001
Mas-Colell, Whinston, Green, "Microeconomic Theory", 1995

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Please note: This course is offered mainly for master students, but is also open for BDPEMS students.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, SPA1, Room 203
Description:

The course reviews the main topics and models of the incentive theory. It focuses on the principal-agent paradigm where the principal delegates an action to a single agent through the take-it-or-leave-it offer of a contract. Major topics are represented by the problem of adverse selection, which occurs when the agent learns some piece of information relevant to the contractual relationship, and the problem of moral hazard, which appears as soon as the agent’s actions are not observable. First, the trade-offs that emerge in these contexts are characterized: the rent extraction-efficiency trade-off under adverse selection and the trade-offs between the extraction of limited liability rent and efficiency and also between insurance and efficiency under moral hazard. Then, extensions of the basic framework to more complex environments are discussed. Mixed models with adverse selection, moral hazard and nonverifiability of the state of the world are also treated. Principal-agent models with adverse selection and moral hazard are finally considered in a dynamic context.

 
Literature:
Laffont/Martimore, "The Theory of Incentives: The Principal-Agent Model", 2001
Bolton/Dewatripont, "Contract Theory", 2005
Salanié, "The Economics of Contracts", 2005
Macho-Stadler, Perez-Castrillo, "An Introduction to the Economics of Information: Incentives and Contracts", 2001
Mas-Colell, Whinston, Green, "Microeconomic Theory", 1995
 
Exam:
Written exam (90 min)
Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The course reviews the main topics and models of the incentive theory. It focuses on the principal-agent paradigm where the principal delegates an action to a single agent through the take-it-or-leave-it offer of a contract. Major topics are represented by the problem of adverse selection, which occurs when the agent learns some piece of information relevant to the contractual relationship, and the problem of moral hazard, which appears as soon as the agent’s actions are not observable. First, the trade-offs that emerge in these contexts are characterized: the rent extraction-efficiency trade-off under adverse selection and the trade-offs between the extraction of limited liability rent and efficiency and also between insurance and efficiency under moral hazard. Then, extensions of the basic framework to more complex environments are discussed. Mixed models with adverse selection, moral hazard and nonverifiability of the state of the world are also treated.
Principal-agent models with adverse selection and moral hazard are finally considered in a dynamic context.

Literature:
Laffont/Martimore, "The Theory of Incentives: The Principal-Agent Model", 2001
Bolton/Dewatripont, "Contract Theory", 2005
Salanié, "The Economics of Contracts", 2005
Macho-Stadler, Perez-Castrillo, "An Introduction to the Economics of Information: Incentives and Contracts", 2001
Mas-Colell, Whinston, Green, "Microeconomic Theory", 1995

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21b
Friday,
12:15pm to 01:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21b
Description:

This course explores search and matching frictions as a fundamental and defining attribute of labor markets. After addressing failures of conventional supply and demand analysis, search and matching frameworks is introduced into general equilibrium and models and the implications are explored. Next, the microfoundations of search theory are introduced and the sequential search model is developed, with extensions involving on-the-job search, learning, wage posting, directed search and competitive search equilibrium.

Literature:
Pissarides, Christopher (2000) Equilibrium Unemployment Theory Cambridge MA MIT Press
Rogerson, Richard, Robert Shimer and Randall Wright (2005) “Search-theoretic Models of the Labor Market: A Survey” Journal of Economic Literature 43: 959-588
other seleted readings from articles and textbooks.

Time and venue:
Lectures: Mondays, 14-16, Spandauer Straße 1, room 21b (starting on April 15)
Repetition: Fridays, 12-14, Spandauer Straße 1, room 21b (starting on April 19)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Tuesday,
12:15pm to 01:45pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 203
Description:

Classical components models; stochastic processes; stationarity; ARIMA processes, GARCH models; specification, estimation and validation of models; forecasting; unit root tests; multivariate extensions: VAR processes, causality and impulse response analysis, cointegrated processes. In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data.

Literature:
Hamilton, D.J. (1994). Time Series Analysis, Princeton University Press.
Lütkepohl, H. (2005). New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer Verlag, Heidelberg

Time and venue:
Mondays, 10-12, Spandauer Straße 1, room 23
Tuesdays, 12-14, Spandauer Straße 1, room 203 (Individual dates are held in room 25 (PC-Pool).)

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday, 02:00pm at HU, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing time series data. The focus is on univariate modelling tools. The lecture begins with classical components models. Then we cover different types of stochastic processes like ARIMA and GARCH models, deal with the unit root methodology and procedures for forecasting as well as for the specification, estimation and validation of models. Multivariate extensions are demonstrated, with emphasis on vector autoregressive (VAR) processes and its application in causality and impulse response analyses. Nonstationary systems with integrated and cointegrated variables will also be treated.

In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data. We will intensively make use of econometric software packages. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Hamilton (1994). Time Series Analysis. Princeton, University Press.
- Schlittgen/Streitberg (2001). Zeitreihenanalyse. Oldenburg Verlag, München.
- Lütkepohl, H. (2005). New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis. Springer Verlag, Heidelberg.

Exam: written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
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Thursday,
02:00pm to 05:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr.58
Friday,
09:00am to 12:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at FU Berlin, Boltzmannstr. 20, Kaminzimmer
Description:

Presentation and discussion of papers

Literature:
Papers with a focus on theory

Exam:
Each participant must present a paper and actively discuss the presented ones.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Do 202 Sitzungsraum / Kaminzimmer (Boltzmannstr. 16-20), Do HFB/K I Konferenzraum (Garystr. 35-37), Do Hs 108a Hörsaal (Garystr. 21)
Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday, 10:15am at Kaminzimmer, Boltzmannstr. 20, Freie Universität Berlin
Description:

This course is one of four Ph.D. courses in the Major Area: Public Economics of the BDPEMS.

This course is a reading course yielding 6 ECTS. Each participant has to present in a detailed way an important recent research article and to actively discuss the presentations made by the other participants. Grades depend on presentation and discussion. The course in the winter term 2014-2015 deals with new developments in public economics related to inequality.

The course is on Thursdays 10 – 12 a.m. and takes place in the "Kaminzimmer" in the building of the Economics Department of the Free University (Boltzmannstr. 20, 14195 Berlin).

Date of beginning: October 22, 2015.

Information requests on the course can be addressed to: Giacomo.Corneo@fu-berlin.de.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 01:00pm
at FU-Berlin, Garystr. 21, room 315
Description:

Analysis of recent publications in Public Economics

Literature: see attachment

Exam: oral presentation

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Boltzmannstr. 20, Kaminzimmer
Description:

Each participant has to present in a detailed way an important recent research article and to actively discuss the presentations made by the other participants. Grades depend on presentation and discussion. The course in the winter term 2013-2014 deals with new developments in public economics related to inequality.

The papers are assigned in the first session on December 19th. A list of the relevant papers will be made available a couple of weeks before the start.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday, 09:00am at Haus Tornow am See
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical finance and macroeconomics. The course provides doctoral students the opportunity to present their own, preliminary research in these areas.

Time and Location:
13th - 14th August 2019
Haus Tornow am See

Registration:
To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract to max.diegel@fu-berlin.de
Registration should take place not later than 31 May, 2019.

Requirements:
The seminar paper will be due few weeks before the date of the seminar. Papers are encouraged to be preliminary.

Credits:
2.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday, 09:00am to Wednesday, 04:00pm
at Haus Tornow am See
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical finance and macroeconomics. The course provides doctoral students the opportunity to present their own, preliminary research in these areas.
Time and Location:
Please note that date and location are preliminary. We hope to be able confirm them by end of April.
Date: 12th - 13th June 2018.
Location: Haus Tornow am See
Registration:
To register for the seminar send an e-mail to simon.jurkatis@fu-berlin.de Registration should take place by 15 April, but late-comer may be accepted.
Past programs can be found here.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
at Haus Tornow am See
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical finance and macroeconomics.
The course provides doctoral students the opportunity to present their own, preliminary research in these areas.

Time and location: August 16-17, 2017 at Haus Tornow am See

Registration:

To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract (not more than one page) to simon.jurkatis@fu-berlin.de
Registration should take place as soon as possible, but not later than 31 May, 2017.

Requirements:

The seminar paper will be due few weeks before the date of the seminar. Papers are encouraged to be preliminary.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at FU Berlin, Boltzmannstrasse 20, Kaminzimmer (Room 202)
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical finance and macroeconomics. Doctoral students are encouraged to present first research projects in these areas during the seminar.

no exam

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
at Haus Tornow am See
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical nance and macroeconomics. The course is intended to engage doctoral students in first research projects in these areas to be presented during the seminar.

Please note that this is a block seminar!

Time and location: August 6-7, 2013 at Haus Tornow am See
- Arrival before lunchtime on August 6
- Departure in the afternoon of August 7

Registration:
To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract (about one page) to gunda-alexandra.detmers@fu-berlin.de. Registration should take place as soon as possible, but not later than April 30, 2013.

Requirements:
The seminar paper will be due two weeks before the date of the seminar. Papers can be preliminary.

Credits:
3.00
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Instructor:
Friday, 10:00am at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room H 0107
Friday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room H 0112
Description:

Was ist ein kausaler Effekt? Wie kann man den kausalen Effekt einer „Behandlung“ (z.B. eines Arbeitsmarktprogramms oder einer Universitätsausbildung) auf eine Resultatsvariable (z.B. auf das Einkommen oder die Beschäftigungswahrscheinlichkeit) mit nicht experimentellen Beobachtungen schätzen? Die grundsätzliche Frage nach der Kausalität in der empirischer Forschung hat in den letzten Jahren enorme Bedeutung gewonnen und zwar nicht nur bei der Entwicklung von Methoden und Modellen zum Thema sondern auch in der Praxis. So versuchen die jüngst im Auftrag des Wirtschaftsministeriums durchgeführten Evaluierungen der Hartz-Reformen allesamt den kausalen Effekt dieser Reformen auf die Arbeitsmarktchancen der Betroffenen zu ermitteln mit Methoden, die in dieser Veranstaltung behandelt werden. Da Kausale Effekte sehr oft Ziel der Forschung sind, ist diese Veranstaltung nützlich als orbereitung für empirischen Forschungsarbeiten aller Art (Seminararbeiten, Masterarbeiten, Studienprojekte, Doktorarbeiten). Ziel ist es, in die Schätzung, Spezifikation, Interpretation und Anwendung der ökonometrischen Modelle einzuführen, die für die Analyse kausaler Effekte entwickelt wurden. Ein sehr wichtiger Bestandteil, um die Qualifikationsziele zu erreichen, sind die Übungen am Computer, um die Methoden selbständig auf reale Daten anzuwenden.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at TU Berlin Main Building, H 107
Description:

Estimating a causal effect or "treatment effect" from nonexperminatal data is the aim of much empirical research in economics. This course will cover the most important concepts and methods in this field from an applied perspective. The proposed schedule is (i) Rubin Model of Causality, (ii) Roy Model of Self-Selection, (iii) Causality and Regression Notation, (iv) Experiments, (v) Conditional Independence, (vi) Heckman Switching Regression, (vii) Instrumental Variables and Local Average Treatment Effect, (viii) Difference-in-Differences and Panel Methods, (ix) Regression Discontinuity Design.

The tutorials provide the opportunity to apply the methods covered in class to real data using the software STATA.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at TU Berlin Main Building (Konrad Mellerowicz-Hörsaal), H 1058
Friday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at TEL 206_rechts
Description:

Estimating a causal effect or "treatment effect" from nonexperminatal data is the aim of much empirical research in economics. This course will cover the most important concepts and methods in this field from an applied perspective. The proposed schedule is (i) Rubin Model of Causality, (ii) Roy Model of Self-Selection, (iii) Causality and Regression Notation, (iv) Experiments, (v) Conditional Independence, (vi) Heckman Switching Regression, (vii) Instrumental Variables and Local Average Treatment Effect, (viii) Difference-in-Differences and Panel Methods, (ix) Regression Discontinuity Design.

The tutorials provide the opportunity to apply the methods covered in class to real data using the software STATA.

The course grade will be primarily based on the final exam. BDPEMS students also need to submit a referee report on a paper that attempts to estimate a causal effect by applying one of the methods presented in class. Many suitable papers can be found on the current and past seminar schedule at http://www.arbeitsmarktforschung.net/.

Literature: Mostly Harmless Econometrics by Angrist and Pischke

Tutorial: Fr 8-10, starting in week 2

Exam: 1 written exam at the end

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room H 0112
Friday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at TU Berlin, Main Building, Room H 0112
Description:

What is a causal effect and how can we identify and estimate a causal effect from nonexperimental data? These are among the most important questions in applied econometric research. This course will give an introduction and overview over the most important concepts and methods in this field, including the Rubin model of causality, the Roy model, statistical matching, instrumental variables, difference-in-differences methods, switching regression models, regression discontinuity design.

Please note that the tutorial, held by Stefan Mangelsdorf, on Fridays, 8-10am, starts on April 20, 2012.

Exam: Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

Estimating a causal effect or "treatment effect" from nonexperminatal data is the aim of much empirical research in economics. This course will cover the most important concepts and methods in this field from an applied perspective. The proposed schedule is (i) Rubin Model of Causality, (ii) Roy Model of Self-Selection, (iii) Causality and Regression Notation, (iv) Experiments, (v) Conditional Independence, (vi) Heckman Switching Regression, (vii) Instrumental Variables and Local Average Treatment Effect, (viii) Difference-in-Differences and Panel Methods, (ix) Regression Discontinuity Design.

The tutorials provide the opportunity to apply the methods covered in class to real data using the software STATA.

The course grade will be primarily based on the final exam. BDPEMS students also need to submit a referee report on a paper that attempts to estimate a causal effect by applying one of the methods presented in class. Many suitable papers can be found on the current and past seminar schedule at http://www.arbeitsmarktforschung.net/.

Literature: Mostly Harmless Econometrics by Angrist and Pischke

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
03:30pm to 05:00pm
at DIW, Mohrenstraße 58
Description:

This work in progress seminar provides doctoral students the opportunity to present ideas, research questions, research design and preliminary results of their first research paper.

Prerequisites:
Students need to have an excellent background in theoretical and empirical methods (Required courses are: Econometrics I or II and two courses out of Micro I&II, Macro I&II or ManSci I&II.) They should have a clear idea of the field they want to write their dissertation in. Moreover, they should have already chosen their supervisor and a topic for their dissertation. The course is designed for PhD students in the second year.

Organization of the Course:
The course is interactive and applied. In the beginning, the students need to develop a research question. This question can be related to any field of economics and management. The research question should lead to the first paper of the dissertation and should be developed in close cooperation with the supervisor. During the course students will discuss their ideas and first results in small groups (4-5 participants) together with an instructor.
There is no final presentation in the course, however to obtain credits students need to present their paper (research question, design and first results) during the second year (winter or summer term) in a Berlin brown bag seminar of their choice. In addition, students need to hand in a three page extended abstract of their paper or a full version of the paper. Depending on the research question, design and method some students will have first results and others not – the structure of this course allows for this heterogeneity.

More information can be found in the course syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
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