Courses

Please check with the BSE Handbook which mandatory courses you have to choose in your PhD track. Not all courses listed here can be approved as Core Courses for all BSE PhD tracks.

Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22
Thursday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Description:

Formal foundations of labor demand and labor supply; and strengths and weaknesses of the Marshallian paradigm of the labor market. Human capital; theories of wage determination; labor market imperfections and institutional constraints; introduction to search and matching models.

Literature:
Pierre Cahuc, Stéphane Carcillo and André Zylberberg, Labor Economics, 2nd edition (MIT Press, 2014) ISBN: 9780262027700;
Tito Boeri and Jan van Ours, The Economics of Imperfect Labor Markets, 2nd edition (Princeton University Press, 2013) ISBN: 9780691158938;
Skript

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 220
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Description:

The course introduces econometric methods for analyzing cross-sectional data, panel data and time series data and discusses their applicability in practice. The following topics are covered: extensions and applications of the linear model; instrumental variable estimation; binary response models; truncated and censored regression, static panel data models; specification, estimation, validation and forecasting of autoregressive models. The application of these methods is explained and illustrated by means of empirical examples.

Literature:
Marno Verbeek: "A Guide to Modern Econometrics", 2012, John Wiley & Sons.
James H. Stock, Mark W. Watson: "Introduction to Econometrics", 2007, Pearson Education.
Christiaan Heij, Paul de Boer et al.: "Econometric Methods with Applications in Business and Economics", 2004, Oxford University Press.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
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Monday,
04:00pm to 05:15pm
at HU, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22 or DIW, Mohrenstraße 58, Elinor-Ostrom-Hall, 1st Floor
Description:

The Berlin Applied Micro Seminar (BAMS) is a weekly seminar, jointly organized by DIW Berlin, Hertie School of Governance, HU Berlin, WZB, the Berlin Centre for Consumer Policies (BCCP) and the SFB TRR 190.

Literature:
none

Criteria to award ECTS:
none

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Instructor:
Wednesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at WZB, Reichpietschufer 50, 10785 Berlin, room D112/113
Description:

In this reading group, we will discuss current research in behavioral and experimental economics with a focus on developing own research ideas. Participants are expected to lead the discussion of an article 2-3 times per semester (depending on the number of participants) and are encouraged to relate the discussed papers to their own research and to identify open questions that they might work on in their future research. By joining the reading group, students can commit to read and discuss interesting research each week and benefit from a cooperative environment where we help each other to understand details and to identify the gist of a paper.

Credits:
3.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
03:00pm to 06:00pm
at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Theologische Fakultät, Burgstr. 26, Room 008, 10178 Berlin
Description:

The Berlin Behavioral Economics Colloquium and Seminar are a joint effort between DIW, WZB, HU Berlin and TU Berlin (in cooperation with CRC TRR 190) with the aim of fostering the exchange between active researchers in the areas of behavioral and experimental economics.
The 2019/20 winter semester series will be held at TU Berlin, Str. des 17. Juni 135, Room: ...?, on Thursdays from 3:00-4:15 pm and 4:45-6:00 pm unless otherwise stated.

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Instructor:
Monday,
05:15pm to 06:30pm
at WZB, Reichpietschufer 50, room B004/005
Description:

This is the Berlin-wide micro theory seminar where outward guest presents their current research. Program available at https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/vwl/microeconomics/research/MicroTheory

Requirements for credits:
documented attendance (no grade)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:30pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 23
Description:

Ongoing research of graduate students in the field of labor market and macro economy is presented and discussed.

Literature:
none

Criteria to award ECTS:
none

Credits:
4.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 201
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 201
Description:

Estimation and testing in the general linear model, generalized least squares estimation, asymptotic theory, maximum likelihood estimation and likelihood based testing, nonlinear regression models, stochastic regressors, instrumental variable estimation, (generalized) method of moments.

Please note that this course can only be attended as BSE Core Course, if you have successfully applied for the Econometrics Beginner's Track (PhD Track in Economics). More information can be found in the BSE Handbook.

Literature:
Davidson, R. and MacKinnon, J.G. (2004): Econometric Theory and Methods, Oxford University Press.
Hayashi, F. (2000): Econometrics, Princeton University Press.

Exam:
Written exam (150 min)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Room 104
Monday,
09:00am to 11:00am
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58
Description:

Part I of the course (Anton Velinov) covers commonly used estimation techniques, such as Ordinary Least Squares, Maximum Likelihood, Generalized Least Squares. The Generalized Method of Moments framework is introduced and several popular estimators (IV, 2SLS, 3SLS, FE, RE) are derived from it.

Part II (Lars Winkelmann) provides a survey of the theory of time series methods in econometrics. Topics include univariate stationary and non-stationary models, vector autoregressions, cointegration, high-dimensional predictive models and volatility models.

Literature:
tba

Time and venue:
Lectures: Fridays, 9:00-13:00 at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Room 104
Tutorials: Mondays, 9:00-11:00 at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, room tba

Exam:
tba

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstr. 1, Room 204
Description:

The objective of this course is that students are able to (i) understand and critically evaluate seminal research in accounting and (ii) use these skills to develop an exposé for a research project that has the potential to contribute to extant literature.
The course entails group discussions of seminal papers that identify fundamental questions in accounting research and that use innovative methods to address such questions.

Literature:
Relevant literature will be provided during the term.

Exam:
Grades will be based on (i) active participation during the reading group sessions and (ii) an exposé for a research project.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 104
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. The course covers alternative empirical approaches and important topics in empirical public economics including non-structural (“treatment effects” estimation) and structural estimation methodologies as well as the empirical ex-ante evaluation of tax-benefit reforms. Lectures on empirical methods are supplemented by classes on the application of the various methods using STATA. The course assumes knowledge of applied microeconometrics.

Literature:
Blundell, R., M. Costa-Dias (2009): Alternative approaches to evaluation in empirical microeconomics. Journal of Human Resources 44, 565–640.
Aaberge, R., U. Columbino (2018): Structural labour supply models and microsimulation. IZA DP No. 11562.

Time and venue:
Lectures: Wednesdays, 14:00-16:00, FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, lecture hall 104
Tutorials: Tuesdays, 10:00-12:00, FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2 or Wednesdays, 10:00-12:00, FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, room K 006b PC-Pool 2

Exam:
2 hours final exam; research paper on empirical topic in public/labour economics (may be part of the PhD thesis)

Credits:
6.00
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Tuesday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

This course presents nonparametric and semiparametric regression techniques and modern microeconometric methods for treatment effects estimation. The treatment focuses on the potential outcome approach, and students learn various methods to account for selection based on observables (regression, matching, inverse probability weighting) and for selection based on unobservables (Heckman selection correction, difference-in-differences, panel regression, instrumental variable regression, regression discontinuity design). These methods are used for cross-section data and longitudinal data, both repeated crosssections and panel data. Students will familiarize themselves with applying the methods to real empirical data using Stata.
Please check the homepage of the chair of econometrics for the course syllabus and for the course material covered in the first lecture before the first lecture on 15 October 2019.

Literature:
AP: Angrist, J. D. and J.-S. Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics – An Empiricist’s Companion, Princeton University Press.
CT: Cameron, A. C. and P. K. Trivedi (2005): Microeconometrics – Methods and Applications, Cambridge University Press.
GR: Greene, W. (2008): Econometric Analysis, 6th, International Edition, Prentice Hall.
HL: Härdle, W. and O. Linton (1994): “Applied Nonparametric Methods”, in: Handbook of Econometrics, Vol. 4, R. F. Engle and O. F. McFadden, (eds.), Elsevier Science.
PU: Pagan, A. and A. Ullah (1999): Nonparametric Econometrics, Cambridge University Press.
WO: Wooldridge, J. M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (see also: http://mitpress.mit.edu/Wooldridge-EconAnalysis).
Further references, particularly regarding the method of Quantile Regression and the application of the methods, will be given in the course.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 125
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22
Description:

The lecture will cover the most important aspects of the European economic development from the turn of the 19th century to the outbreak of the First World War. Topics include the Industrial Revolution, population growth and migration, international trade, the Gold Standard, as well as the economics of nationalism, colonialism and war. In the tutorial, we will discuss key texts and important concepts.

Literature:
Broadberry, S.; O’Rourke, K. (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.

Time and venue:
Lectures: Tuesdays, 14:00-16:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 125
Tutorials: Wesnesdays, 10:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 22

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

The objective of the “Financial Accounting Research Group” (FARG) is to introduce selected students to current research in financial accounting. Participants of the FARG will learn the necessary skills to understand conceptual underpinnings and common empirical design choices in this area of research.
The FARG is organized around the Finance-Accounting Research Seminar that provides a forum for invited guest speakers to present current research papers. Participants of the FARG are welcome to attend the accounting talks of this seminar and expected to join internal discussion meetings of our institute in preparation of these talks. There are usually three accounting talks and three preparatory discussion meetings per semester. For details on the schedules of current and past semesters, please see here: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/bwl/finance/seminars
Students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) participating in the FARG for at least two semesters and (ii) writing three reviews (or two reviews and a discussion protocol) on papers that are presented by our guest speakers. Students who participated in the FARG for at least two semesters will receive a certificate that confirms their participation. Enrolment into the FARG is possible at the beginning of each semester. Details on the application procedure will be announced in early April (summer term) and early October (winter term) via the website of our institute.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
04:00pm to 05:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Karl-Popper-Room (2.3.020)
Description:

This course aims at enabling students to conduct research in promising areas in macroeconomics. One area aims to identify the effects of fiscal and monetary policy using micro datasets. Further "hot" areas are macro and inequality, the role of expectations in macro, and macrofinance.
In a first step, we read and discuss recent papers and some classics. The fruitful discussions and the intensive engagement with the topics should lead to the development of independent research ideas.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

It is possible that you might not find all of the courses on this page. Please double-check also the Fall 2018 Course Catalogues of each institution:

HU
TU
FU
University of Potsdam
ESMT
DIW

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
Description:

We study coordination and incentive problems within and between firms based on seminal and recent research papers from the fields of organizational and personnel economics. We will especially focus on coordination in hierarchies, teamwork, and economic perspectives on leadership.

Literature:
tba

Exam:
There will be a one-hour exam at the end of the course that students need to pass. In addition, students are required to either write a short term paper presenting an own research idea that is related to the topic of the course or write a referee report on a paper covered in the course. The course will be successfully completed if the exam and the term paper/referee report are each graded with 4.0 or better. The final grade for the course will be the average of the two grades.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
06:00pm to 08:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Schumpeter Lounge
Credits:
3.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
08:30am to 12:00pm
at DIW, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor-Ostrom Hall (1.2.019)
Description:

The objective of this course is to teach M.A. and Ph.D. students to use macroeconomic concepts and techniques for their own research and incorporates a higher degree of formal analysis than in the introductory master's lecture (IAMA).

Part I (Prof. Burda): Methods of modern macroeconomics for researchers in the field. Stationary Markov environments, state-space methods, stochastic difference equations. Dynamic programming and Lagrangian methods, complete markets, dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, solution techniques.

Part II (Prof. Weinke): Dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models for positive and normative macroeconomic analysis. To this end a number of theoretical and empirical concepts are presented: The computation of impulse response functions, structural vector autoregressions, as well as an introduction to structural estimation. On the normative side the concept of Ramsey optimal policy is presented.

Literature:
Reference list (Prof. Burda): Ljungqvist and Sargent, Recursive Macroeconomics, 4th edition (MIT Press, USA: 2018); selected journal articles available on moodle.
Reference list (Prof Weinke): Selected articles, e.g., Galí, Jordi and Pau Rabanal (2004), Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations: How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data?, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual. Any further documents needed for the lecture will be available on moodle.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
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Thursday,
09:00am to 12:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Description:

Part 1: Henry Sauermann ‘The economics and sociology of science’

Part 2: Linus Dahlander ‘Management of innovation’

Literature: please see syllabus
Exam: paper presentation/term paper

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 112
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Literature:
announced at first meeting

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Main Building, room H 0106
Thursday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
Friday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21b
Description:

This course is devoted to the core elements of microeconomics. We study both the economics of households and the economics of firms and introduce general equilibrium with particular attention to the two welfare theorems. We also examine decisions under uncertainty, introducing expected and non-expected utility theories. The analysis of choice under uncertainty leads to the examination of financial markets and to strategic interaction problems, which we introduce through the key notions in noncooperative game theory, in particular Nash equilibrium and its most important refinements. Also matching problems will be discussed.

Literature:
Mas-Colell, A., Whinston, M.D. and J.R. Green (1995), Microeconomic Theory, Oxford University Press

Time and venue:
Lectures: Mondays, 12:00-16:00, TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, Main Building, room H 0106
Tutorials: Thursdays, 14:00-16:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a or Fridays, 16:00-18:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21b

Exam:
4 written midterms and 1 written final exam

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday, 03:30pm at DIW, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall/Karl Popper Room
Description:

In this seminar, the participants shall prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the European crisis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (especially the monetary policy of the ECB) as well as the functioning of the financial markets or the contagion effects of the crisis. The paper can be empirical or theoretical and shall orientate towards the academic literature in this field.
To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

Discussion of seminar topics: 29.10.2019, 10:00-12:30 & 31.10.2019, 10:00-12:30
Presentation and discussion of seminar papers: 23.01.2020, 10:00-14:00 & 30.01.2020, 10:00-14:00

Registration: 7.10.2019 - 11.10.2019 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de (Please indicate your program and matriculation number.)

Exam:
Ungraded presentation and discussion, and term paper.

Credits:
6.00
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Tuesday,
10:00am to 05:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

The Preparatory Math Course aims to equip students with the necessary math background for the first year (compulsory) economics graduate level courses. It is mainly meant to be a refresher of existing math knowledge. More information will follow soon.

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Instructor:
Thursday,
02:15pm to 05:15pm
at FU, Lecture Hall 108a, Garystr. 21, 14195 Berlin
Description:

This seminar is geared toward students who are at the beginning of their second or third year. The seminar aims to help students kick-starting their first research project respectively first research paper. The seminar offers students a forum to present and discuss their first own research project. Presentation of early stage research projects or research ideas is encouraged. Extensive feedback will be provided. Active participation in all weekly meetings is mandatory. Students who wish to obtain ECTS credits are required to write a research paper about the topic of their presentation. After grading the research paper, students will receive feedback from Prof. Nautz and Prof. Trabandt about the research paper and recommendations on how to proceed with their research agenda towards their dissertation.

Literature:
will be announced during the seminar

Exam:
research paper

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
04:30pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21A
Description:

This seminar is geared toward students who are at the beginning of their second or third year. The seminar aims to help students kick-starting and receive active feedback on their research projects in micro economic theory. Students who wish to obtain ECTS credits are required to present at least once, attend at least 75% of the sessions, and actively participate in the discussions. Presentation of early stage research projects or research ideas is highly encouraged. The seminar offers students a forum to present and discuss their own research project. Extensive feedback will be provided.

Literature:
none

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstr. 1, Room 405
Description:

The course will introduce students to current research topics in financial intermediation, via reading, presenting, and discussing papers together. We will start with more “classic” topics such as bank runs (e.g. Diamond and Dybvig 1983, Allen and Gale 1998, Morris and Shin 1998) and techniques for estimating the effect of bank balance sheet shocks on credit supply (Khwaja and Mian 2008). Other topics in the area of financial intermediation will be chosen according to the specific interests of seminar participants. Participants will learn about the literature and thereby be better able to find their own research topics that contribute to said literature.

Literature:
Academic papers

Exam:
Term paper (30,000 characters)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

No obtainment of credit points

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Tuesday,
10:00am to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

Social or other-regarding preferences refer to preferences of economic agents regarding other people’s outcomes. These preferences can be both benevolent and malevolent, but crucially they differ from selfish preferences without any regard for others. The course provides an introduction to key evidence about the relevance of social preferences in economic interaction as well as the most important theoretical approaches that aim at explaining these results.
Most of the discussed evidence will be from controlled laboratory experiments. Critique regarding the relevance of (laboratory) experiments on social preferences will be discussed as well. Apart from methodological critique, experimental studies that critically reflect on prominent papers and research agendas will be presented in order to highlight the relevance of apparent subtleties in experimental design.
Specific requirements:
Some knowledge of game theory is helpful, but fairly basic experience is mostly sufficient. Knowledge of statistical analysis will make it easier to follow the data analysis in the experimental papers and thus enable a more critical view, but is not strictly necessary.

Literature:
The course literature consists of a list of journal articles. Some key articles are below, further literature will be announced during the course.
Andreoni, James (1995). Cooperation in Public Goods Experiments: Kindness or Confusion? American Economic Review 85(4),
891-904.
Andreoni, James and John H. Miller (2002). Giving According to GARP: An Experimental Test of the Consistency of Preferences for Altruism. Econometrica 70(2), 737-753.
Bénabou, Roland and Jean Tirole (2006). Incentives and prosocial behavior. American Economic Review 96(5). 1652-1678.
Blanco, Mariana, Dirk Engelmann, and Hans-Theo Normann (2011). A Within-Subject Analysis of Other-Regarding Preferences. Games and Economic Behavior 72(2), 321-338.
Bolton, Gary E. and Axel Ockenfels (2000). ERC: A Theory of Equity, Reciprocity and Competition. American Economic Review 90(1), 166-193.
Dufwenberg, Martin, Paul Heidhues, Georg Kirchsteiger, Frank Riedel, and Joel Sobel (2011). Other-Regarding Preferences in General Equilibrium. Review of Economic Studies 78(2), 613-639.
Engelmann, Dirk and Martin Strobel (2004). Inequality Aversion, Effciency, and Maximin Preferences in Simple Distribution Experiments. American Economic Review 94(4), 857-869.
Fehr, Ernst and Simon Gächter (2000). Cooperation and Punishment in Public Goods Experiments. American Economic Review 90(4), 980-994.
Fehr, Ernst and Klaus M. Schmidt (1999). A Theory of Fairness, Competition and Cooperation. Quarterly Journal of Economics 114(3), 817-868.
Levitt, Steven D. and List, John A. (2007). What Do Laboratory Experiments Measuring Social Preferences Reveal About the Real World? Journal of Economic Perspectives 21(2), 153-174.
Nikiforakis, Nikos, 2008. Punishment and Counter-punishment in Public Good Games: Can we Really Govern Ourselves? Journal of Public Economics 92(1-2), 91-112.
Early relevant surveys are provided in:
• Camerer, Colin F. (2003). Behavioral Game Theory, Princeton University Press. Chapter 2
• Ledyard, John (1995): Public Goods: A Survey of Experiment Research. In: John H. Kagel and Alvin E. Roth, Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton University Press.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Description:

This course communicates how to develop data science applications that comply to the FAIR principles of open science. That means that they are findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. After this course, participants should

  • be able to use common collaboration tools in software development like Git and Github,
  • understand how to use functional and object-oriented programming approaches to develop accessible code,
  • be capable to develop test routines and debug code,
  • have gained an understanding on how to profile code,
  • have developed routines for standard data analysis tasks, like data scraping, cleaning and visualization, and
  • have understood how to package statistical applications so that they are portable across platforms.

While this course is targeted at incoming doctoral researchers of the TRR 266 “Accounting for Transparency”, non TRR members at the doctoral and master level are free to attend, capacity permitting. Please apply by September 2nd by sending an email including a brief CV and your current transcript to gassen@wiwi.hu-berlin.de. Students will be informed about their acceptance by September 4th.

More information on the course can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at tba
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at tba
Description:

The Economics of Climate Policy is an introductory course into the economics of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies. Essentially, the mitigation of climate change is a global public good, posing policy challenges both at the national level (within countries) as well as at the international level (between countries). In the course, concepts such as market failures, externalities, and Pigouvian taxes are developed and applied to climate change. Game theory will be introduced to understand the challenges in international climate negotiations. The history and status quo of international negotiations will be reviewed, as well as implementation policies such as the EU ETS and Germany’s Energiewende. Since these concepts can be applied to many public policy problems, the course is also an introduction into allocation theory, environmental economics, public finance and game theory.

Topics:
Starting from the perspective of decentralized decision making and coordination, we provide a systematic overview of the relevant issues in climate change policy. This includes, inter alia:

  • Climate change as a market failure: externalities and public goods, internalization options such as Pigouvian tax and cap and trade systems (prices vs. quantities), policy instrument design
  • Game theory, behavioral economics and Elinor Ostrom’s approaches to governing commons
  • The international politics of climate change: the history and status quo of UNFCCC climate negotiations from Rio to Kyoto and Paris, incentives for countries to reduce emissions: co-benefits, double dividend, and climate agreements
  • Climate policies today: The European Union Emission Trading scheme (EU ETS), Germany’s Energiewende, and the U.S. EPA Clean Power Plan

Literature:

Obligatory readings (along with the course)

  • Perman et al.: Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Pearson.
  • Stern Review, part IV – VI
  • IPCC AR5 WG III, chapters 13-15
  • Edenhofer et al.: The Atmosphere as a Global Common - Challenges for International Cooperation and Governance, Handbook of the Macroeconomics of Global Warming
  • A number of specific articles will be distributed during the semester. Students are expected to read about one paper per week.

Recommended readings (to prepare for the course)

  • Fudenberg & Tirole: Game theory, MIT Press.
  • The timeline of UNFCCC climate negotiations.

Exam:

Students will be graded based on weekly problem sets (homework assignments) and a written mid-term exam. There is no final exam. Ph.D. students will be asked to take an oral exam in addition to the assignments and the mid-term exam.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21b
Description:

In the seminar, the theoretical foundations of machine learning will be discussed. Topic include probably almost correct learning, VC dimension, risk minimization, boosting, model selection, stochastic gradient descent, support vector machines, kernel methods, and neural networks. After an introduction to the general topic of machine learning, students will present a chapter in the book “Understanding machine learning” by Shalev-Shwartz and Ben-David (Cambridge Universit Press) and hand in a short summary of the key findings. Participation in the discussions is expected.

Literature:
“Understanding machine learning” by Shalev-Shwartz and Ben-David (Cambridge Universit Press)

Exam:
Presentation and portfolio (30,000 characters). The portfolio examination consists of a research project in which the students show their learning progress.

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at FU Berlin, Boltzmannstr. 20, Kaminzimmer
Description:

Presentation and discussion of papers

Literature:
Papers with a focus on theory

Exam:
Each participant must present a paper and actively discuss the presented ones.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
03:30pm to 05:00pm
at DIW, Mohrenstraße 58
Description:

This work in progress seminar provides doctoral students the opportunity to present ideas, research questions, research design and preliminary results of their first research paper.

Prerequisites:
Students need to have an excellent background in theoretical and empirical methods (Required courses are: Econometrics I or II and two courses out of Micro I&II, Macro I&II or ManSci I&II.) They should have a clear idea of the field they want to write their dissertation in. Moreover, they should have already chosen their supervisor and a topic for their dissertation. The course is designed for PhD students in the second year.

Organization of the Course:
The course is interactive and applied. In the beginning, the students need to develop a research question. This question can be related to any field of economics and management. The research question should lead to the first paper of the dissertation and should be developed in close cooperation with the supervisor. During the course students will discuss their ideas and first results in small groups (4-5 participants) together with an instructor.
There is no final presentation in the course, however to obtain credits students need to present their paper (research question, design and first results) during the second year (winter or summer term) in a Berlin brown bag seminar of their choice. In addition, students need to hand in a three page extended abstract of their paper or a full version of the paper. Depending on the research question, design and method some students will have first results and others not – the structure of this course allows for this heterogeneity.

More information can be found in the course syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
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