Courses

Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at Dorotheenstr. 1, room 005
Description:

Upon completion of the course, students will be familiar with arguments and approaches in modern corporate finance theory, will be able to apply these in their own research, and will be able to critically evaluate current research in this area.

Literature: There is no single textbook. We will use selected parts of Jean Tirole, “The Theory of Corporate Finance,” as well as current and classic papers.

Exam: Take-home exam/ referee report

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 22
Description:

This course provides an overview on the economic analysis of labor markets. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, human capital, education and training, changes in the wages structure and inequality, biased technological change and returns to skills, organizational change and skill demand, the closing gender gap. The introduction of topics will be on textbook level, but the focus will be on the discussion of empirical implementation strategies used in recent publications.

Acquaintance of intermediate microeconomics or labor economics and econometrics is highly recommended.

Literature:
R. Ehrenberg and R. Smith, 2003, Modern Labor Economics,
P. Cahuc and A. Zylberberg, 2004, Labor Economics,
and selected journal articles

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at Freie Universität, Garystr. 21, lecture halle 104
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Freie Universität, Garystr. 21, K 006a PC Pool 1
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. The course covers alternative empirical approaches and important topics in empirical public economics including non-structural (“treatment effects” estimation) and structural estimation methodologies as well as the empirical ex-ante evaluation of tax-benefit reforms. Lectures on empirical methods are supplemented by classes on the application of the various methods using STATA. The course assumes knowledge of applied microeconometrics.

Literature:
Blundell, R., M. Costa-Dias (2009): Alternative approaches to evaluation in empirical microeconomics. Journal of Human Resources 44, 565–640.
Aaberge, R., U. Columbino (2018): Structural labour supply models and microsimulation. IZA DP No. 11562.

Exam:
2 hours final exam; research paper on empirical topic in public/labour economics (may be part of the PhD thesis)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
08:30am to 10:00am
at HU, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 23
Tuesday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at HU, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 23
Description:

This course presents nonparametric and semiparametric regression techniques and modern microeconometric methods for treatment effects estimation. The treatment focuses on the potential outcome approach, and students learn various methods to account for selection based on observables (regression, matching, inverse probability weighting) and for selection based on unobservables (Heckman selection correction, difference-in-differences, panel regression, instrumental variable regression, regression discontinuity design). These methods are used for cross-section data and longitudinal data, both repeated cross-sections and panel data. Students will familiarize themselves with applying the methods to real empirical data using Stata.

Literature:
Angrist, J. D. and J.-S. Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics – An Empiricist’s Companion, Princeton University Press.
Pagan, A. and A. Ullah (1999): Nonparametric Econometrics, Cambridge University Press
Wooldridge, J. M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Exam:
Written exam (to register for the exam, PhD students must present a research paper)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 125
Description:

The lecture will cover the most important aspects of the European economic development from the turn of the 19th century to the outbreak of the First World War. Topics include the Industrial Revolution, population growth and migration, international trade, the Gold Standard, as well as the economics of nationalism, colonialism and war. In the tutorial, we will discuss key texts and important concepts.

Literature:
Broadberry, S.; O’Rourke, K. (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at Spandauer Straße 1, room 112
Description:

Abstract and Learning Objectives
Various robust deviations from rational decision making have been reported such as loss aversion, probability weighting, status quo bias, overconfidence etc. Understanding those deviations leads to a more realistic modelling of the behavior of different economic actors and to an increased prediction success. In this course, participants will understand those and other important deviations from rationality as well as their theoretical explanations/modelling, e.g., prospect theory and mental accounting. Most theories have been developed implementing psychological and economic experiments. Whereas psychological experiments are mostly asking the respondents for hypothetical choices, real decisions with actual monetary payoffs are implemented in economic experiments. Half of the course will be concerned with a profound introduction to the several deviations from rationality that have been reported with real decision makers and with the theoretical treatment of those deviations. The other half of the course will deal with different types of experiments and different experimental designs as well as the matching of research question and type of empirical method to be used.

Content
Whereas the first two days take the form of an interactive lecture and are mostly devoted to laying the basic knowledge in experimental research and behavioral decision theory, the next two days are devoted to specific applications of behavioral decision theory to selected topics in tax compliance, behavioral finance, behavioral insurance, entrepreneurial decisions, venture financing decisions, and consumer behavior. Whereas not all areas of business research are captured in the example studies, the applications are diverse as well as broad enough to have participants from different fields benefit from this course.

Selected Literature:
Friedman, D., Sunder, S. (1994): Experimental methods: A primer for economists. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK) and New York (USA).
Gigerenzer, G., Todd, P. M. and the ABC Research Group (1999): Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart. Oxford University Press, Oxford (UK).
Kahneman, D. and Tversky, A. (1979): Prospect theory: An analysis of decision under risk. Econometrica 47, 263-291.

More literature to be found in the syllabus.

Exam:
to be announced

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

Course Description
Researchers face the challenge to translate their academic results to policy makers and to the public. Often the results are derived using complex theoretical or empirical models, which are based on strong assumptions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods and skills, which allow to explain the models and the assumptions to policy makers and to derive results and policy conclusions based on the models.
This course provides an introduction to policy analysis and to evidence-based policy advice. The course addresses the following questions:
How to motivate the research and policy questions?
How to discuss the methods and assumptions used for the policy analysis?
How to discuss limitations of the research design?
How to present the results to policy makers?
How to derive policy conclusions?
During the course students will prepare a policy paper which should be ideally based on a paper of the dissertation. We will focus on oral and written presentations of the policy paper.
Prerequisites
Students need to have an excellent background in theoretical and empirical methods (Required courses are: Econometrics I&II and two courses out of Micro I&II, Macro I&II or ManSci I&II.) They should have a clear idea of which field they want to write their dissertation in. Moreover, they should have already chosen their supervisor and a topic for a first paper of the dissertation. PhD students have the possibility to take the course in the 3rd or the 5th term.
Organization of the Course
The course is interactive and applied. In the beginning, the students need to develop a research question with a clear policy focus. The question and the research design can be related to any field of economics. The research question is closely related to the first paper of the dissertation and should be developed in close cooperation with the supervisor.
At the same time, a course advisor from the pool of instructors will be matched with the students. The advisors provide guidance throughout the course and offer office hours.
There will be four class meetings with the following requirements (concrete dates will follow):
1. Introduction (mid October) – organization and example of policy briefing (Tomaso Duso and Peter Haan)
2. Abstract (200 words) of the research project that will be the basis for the policy paper (shortly after the first meeting, mid October). Based on this abstract we will match students to a course advisor.
3. Presentation of the research question (after 4 weeks – mid November)
Students have to hand in a two page description of the question, including a motivation of why the question is important for policy – specifically taking into account the debate relevant to their question – and which research design will be chosen. During the meeting students need to present their research question in 5 minutes.
4. Presentation of the method and assumptions (Mid-term) (after 2 months – mid December)
Mid-term paper: Students have to hand in a five-page description of the method and the assumptions and first preliminary results. During the meeting students need to present their mid-term paper in 7 minutes.
5. Presentation of the results and of the policy conclusions (after 4 months).
Students have to hand in a final 10 page policy paper including executive summary, motivation, method, results and policy conclusion. During the meeting students need to present their results in 10 minutes.
Related Literature:
Jayaraman, R. and J. Rocholl (2017): Research-based policy advice to the G20, G20 Insights, May 21. Available online at http://www.g20-insights.org/policy_briefs/research-based-policy-advice-g20/
Financial Stability Board (2017): Framework for Post-Implementation Evaluation of the Effects of the G20 Financial Regulatory Reforms. Available online at http://www.fsb.org/2017/07/framework-for-post-implementation-evaluation-...

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 21b
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Literature:
tba

Exam:
Presentations and oral participation

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 11:30am
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Karl Popper Room - 2.3.020
Description:

In this seminar, the participants shall prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the European crisis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (especially the monetary policy of the ECB) as well as the functioning of the financial markets or the contagion effects of the crisis. The paper can be empirical or theoretical and shall orientate towards the academic literature in this field.

10:00 bis 11:30, 30.10.2018
10:00 bis 11:30, 02.11.2018
10:00 bis 11:30, 09.11.2018
10:00 bis 13:00, 24.01.2019
10:00 bis 13:00, 25.01.2019
10:00 bis 13:00, 28.01.2019

Discussion of seminar topics: 30.10., 02.11., 09.11.2018
Presentation and discussion of seminar papers: 24.01., 25.01., 28.01.2019

Part of the seminar: ungraded presentation and discussion.

To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

Restriction to participation: 20

Registration: 9.10.2018 - 15.10.2018 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de. Please indicate your program and matriculation number.

Audience: Master students, PhD (BDPEMS, GC)

Assessment: Term paper

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Subscribe to Courses