Courses

Please check with the BSE Handbook which mandatory courses you have to choose in your PhD track. Not all courses listed here can be approved as Core Courses for all BSE PhD tracks.

Instructor:
Friday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 204
Description:

The objective of this course is that students are able to (i) understand and critically evaluate seminal research in accounting and (ii) use these skills to develop an exposé for a research project that has the potential to contribute to extant literature.
The course entails group discussions of seminal papers that identify fundamental questions in accounting research and that use innovative methods to address such questions.

Literature:
Relevant literature will be provided during the term.

Exam:
Grades will be based on (i) active participation during the reading group sessions and (ii) an exposé for a research project.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Monday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 203
Description:

This course teaches new developments in the field of monetary economics. We start with a refresher on the dynamic New Keynesian model that is center stage in the course "Monetary Economics". We then continue with analyses of indeterminacy and welfare. In each case we will put particular emphasis on the role played by features that make New Keynesian theory attractive from an empirical point of view. We will also develop the techniques that are necessary to work with those concepts. In the second part of the course we will discuss some recent extensions of the New Keynesian model. Examples include models with labor market frictions, open economy models as well as models with financial frictions. Those features are empirically motivated and their presence also has important normative implications, as we are going to see.

Literature:
Galí, Jordi (2015): Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle, second edition, Princeton University Press.
Further literature: see Moodle

Exam:
written exam, 90 min

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Friday, 11:30am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
Description:

Leadership in innovative organizations: What does experimental and behavioural economics teach us about how to “deepen” agile work? In this seminar we will discuss what companies can learn from behavioural and experimental economics about the human resource management. The focus of the seminar will lie on recent trends of modern workplace and workflow arrangements and challenges they may bring for employees productivity (e.g., hyper connectivity, agile work, team work etc.). We will search for and discuss the empirical studies from the lab and the field. By doing so, we will review the key concepts of scientific writing. The participants will develop their own research question and experimental design. An extensive feedback will be provided by the tutor and other seminar participants. The format of this seminar crucially relies on the vivid exchange of ideas and thoughts among its participants in form of discussions and presentations. Therefore, the participants should be motivated to attend all sessions, take an active part in group discussions, and present their ideas in front of the group, and write a seminar paper.

Course times and venue:
17.04.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
30.04.2020: 14:00-18:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
29.05.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
05.06.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
19.06.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
26.06.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
17.07.2020: 8:00-12:00, HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a

Please register with Anastasia Danilov until March 15, 2020, via email to anastasia.danilov@hu-berlin.de.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.

In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA.

Literature:
Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The course will provide an introduction to the core concepts of auction theory. The learning experience will be enriched with case studies from auctions in the lab and in the field. Successful participants can solve optimal-bidding problems in standard auction forms, using advanced mathematical techniques. They first model the informational environment in a given application, using probability theory, and, second, use optimization theory to find optimal bidding strategies. Insights from mechanism design will enable them to design and solve novel auction formats. They learn to model both roles in seller-buyer environments.
Optimal bidding in single-unit auctions with symmetric independent private values: First-price auctions, second-price auctions, all-pay auctions; the revenue-equivalence theorem; risk-averse bidders; asymmetric bidders; optimal auctions and mechanism design; interdependent values, multi-unit auctions.

More information on how to participate in the online course is provided in TU Berlin's ISIS portal
The first lecture will be on April 21. The time slots for lectures and sessions remain as scheduled.

Exam:
There will be a 90-minutes exam at the end of the course that students need to pass.
In addition, PhD students are required to either write a short term paper presenting an own research idea that is related to the topic of the course or present in class a recent (working/discussion) paper related to the course. In the presentation, the paper’s contribution to the literature has to be evaluated critically. The course will be successfully completed if the exam and the term paper/presentation are each graded with 4.0 or better. The final grade for the course will be the average of the two grades.

Literature:
The class is mainly based on Vijay Krishna - Auction Theory, Academic Press, 2009

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 11:30am
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58, Karl Popper Room
Description:

Researchers face the challenge to translate their academic results to policy makers and to the public. Often the results are derived using complex models, which are based on strong assumptions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods and skills, which allow to explain the models and the assumptions to policy makers and to the public and to derive results and policy conclusions based on the models. This course provides an introduction to communication of academic research to the public and to evidence based policy consulting.

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 125
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 125
Description:

The course deals with the economic development of Europe from the beginning of the First World War up to the current situation from a historical perspective. Key topics include the economics of the two wars, European hyperinflations, the great depression, the bloc-wise economic integration in Western and Eastern Europe, the Golden Age of Growth, the economics of stagflation, global integration and global imbalances in a long-run perspective.

Literature:
Stephen Broadberry, and Kevin H O'Rourke (eds) (2010) "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe" , Vol 2: 1870 to the Present, Cambridge.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

This seminar focuses on recent developments in experimental economics. Each weak, students critically discuss one recent paper, with an emphasis on the experimental design and data analysis. A major objective of the course is for students to develop a great deal of familiarity with the design of experiments as a method for economic research. Participants are expected to attend all sessions and participate actively in the discussions.

It is recommended that participants are familiar with fundamental concepts of causal inference and data analysis.

To obtain course credits, students have to submit 3 one-pagers (not graded) and write a final referee report (ca. 10.000 characters).

Course registration is open from 5.3.2020-5.4.2020. To register, students should send an email to Dr. Jana Friedrichsen (jana.friedrichsen@hu-berlin.de) and Dr. Lea Heursen (lea.heursen@hu-berlin.de). In this email, students should write a short paragraph, describing what motivates them to take this seminar. If more than 20 students would like to take this seminar for credit, a lottery will determine the seats.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The objective of the “Financial Accounting Research Group” (FARG) is to introduce select students to current research in financial accounting. Participants of the FARG will learn the necessary skills to understand conceptual underpinnings and common empirical design choices in this area of research.

The FARG is organized around the Finance-Accounting Research Seminar that provides a forum for invited guest speakers to present current research papers. Participants of the FARG are welcome to attend the accounting talks of this seminar and expected to join internal discussion meetings of our institute in preparation of these talks. There are usually three accounting talks and three preparatory discussion meetings per semester. For details on the schedules of current and past semesters, please see here: https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/en/professuren/bwl/finance/seminars

Master students can obtain 6 ECTS by (i) participating in the FARG for at least two semesters and (ii) writing three reviews (or two reviews and a discussion protocol) on papers that are presented by our guest speakers. Bachelor students cannot obtain ECTS through the FARG, but they are very welcome to join our talks and discussion meetings for inspiration. Students who participated in the FARG for at least two semesters will receive a certificate that confirms their participation.

Enrolment into the FARG is possible at the beginning of each semester. Details on the application procedure will be announced in early April (summer term) and early October (winter term) via the website of our institute.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

It is possible that you might not find all of the courses on this page. Please double-check also the Fall 2018 Course Catalogues of each institution:

HU
TU
FU
University of Potsdam
ESMT
Hertie School
DIW

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 112
Description:

Focusing on a specific topic within microeconomic theory, the seminar studies recent developments in the literature of mechanism design, contract theory, industrial organization, and organization theory. Students discuss and present related research papers, pointing out their interrelations and discussing their main contributions. The seminar puts a particular emphasis on understanding the theoretical underpinning behind the papers’ results and the economic mechanisms they capture. A major goal of the seminar is to find new open questions for future research. Participants are expected to attend all the sessions, read all the discussed papers beforehand, and participate actively in discussions.

Requirements for credits:
discussion of a paper (no grade)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 01:00pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58, Elinore Ostrom Hall
Description:

The seminar deals with changes and new developments in the theoretical and empirical literature on monetary policy. Topics covered through lectures and seminar papers include the following: the appropriate mandates and objective function of central banks, the relationship between monetary policy and financial supervision, the role of the exchange rates, the functioning of monetary policy in a monetary union, the importance of fiscal dominance, quantitative easing during financial crises, the role of communication of objectives and policies, the functioning of central bank committees, transparency and independence and accountability, global coordination of monetary policy, the international role of the euro and the US dollar.
The course will first start with a series of lectures addressing these various issues. The seminar participants are then asked to prepare a seminar paper on one of the issues, which then has to be presented and discussed towards the end of the semester. To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other. The lectures will take place on 28 April and 5 May. The seminar presentations will take place on 7, 14 and 16 July.
Part of the seminar: Ungraded presentation and discussion
Restriction to participation: 20
Registration: 30.03. to 03.04.2020 via e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de

Literature:
1. Monetary policy by the ECB
There is a large controversy about the effectiveness of the ECB’s unconventional monetary policies. Is monetary policy doing too much; is the ECB going beyond its mandate? What should it do going forward? And how effective have its nonstandard monetary policy been in the past?

Altavilla, C., Giannone, D., Lenza, M., 2014. The financial and macroeconomic effects of the OMT announcements. ECB Working Paper forthcoming.
Fratzscher, M., Lo Duca, M., Straub, R., 2014, “ECB Unconventional Monetary Policy Actions: Market Impact, International Spillovers and Transmission Channels”, IMF AR conference paper.
Rogers, J. H., Scotti, C. and Wright, J. H., 2014. Evaluating asset-market effects of unconventional monetary policy: a cross country comparison. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, International Finance Discussion Papers No. 1101, March 2014.
Praet, P (2013), "Forward Guidance and the ECB", VoxEU.org, August 6.

2. Unconventional monetary policy by the Federal Reserve
The Federal Reserve has been one of the first central banks that adopted a policy of quantitative easing following the global financial crisis in 2008. The Fed combined these policies with other policy measures. Moreover, quantitative easing policies differ sharply across countries and central banks, given different objectives and different market structures. What are the channels through which nonstandard monetary policy functions? What is the evidence which of these channels were most important? What are the costs and benefits from such policies?

Bauer M.D., Rudebush, G., 2013. The Signalling Channel of Federal Reserve Bond Purchases. International Journal of Central Banking, forthcoming.
Gagnon, J., Raskin, M., Remache, J., Sack, B., 2011. “The Financial Market Effect of Federal Reserve’s Large-Scale Asset Purchases”. International Journal of Central Banking, 7 (1), 3–43.
Krishnamurthy A., Vissing-Jorgensen, A., 2011. The effects of quantitative easing on interest rates: channels and implications for policy. Brookings Papers on Economic Activity 2, 215-287.

3. Spillovers and interdependence of monetary policy
There is a big discussion in international fora whether and how large spillovers of US and European quantitive easing policies have been over the past few years to other countries, in particular emerging markets what is the evidence for such spillovers? What are the costs and benefits? Do emerging markets benefits from such policies or do they suffer?

Bowman, D., Londono, J. M., Sapriza, H., 2014. US unconventional monetary policy and contagion to emerging market economies. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Mimeo.
Chen,Q., Fliardo, A., He, D., and Zhu F., 2012. International spillovers of central bank balance sheet policies. BIS Working Paper 66, 2012.
Fratzscher, M., Lo Duca, M., Straub, R., 2013, “On the international spill-overs of US quantitative easing”. ECB Working Paper No. 1557.
Lim, J., J.,Mohapatra, S., Stocker, M., 2014. Tinker, Taper, QE, Bye? The Effect of Quantitative Easing on Financial Flows to Developing Countries. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 6820.

4. The inflation targeting debate – has inflation targeting been successful?
Central banks have shifted massively towards inflation targeting since the early 1990s. But this trend has been stopped and partly been reverse during the crisis as many central banks have abandoned informally heir inflation objective and focused on other objectives (financial stability, growth, employment, exchange rate stability). What are the pros nd cons of IT? Is it still the preferred monetary policy regime after the crises? What are the criteria to answer this question, and what is the outlook for the future?
- Fatas, A., Mihov, I. and A. Rose (2006). Quantitative Goals for Monetary Policy, Journal of Money, Credit and Banking.
- Levin, A.T., F.M. Natalucci and J.M. Piger (2004). The Macroeconomic Effects of Inflation Targeting. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review. 86(4), 51-80.
- Gürkaynak, R., A. Levin, und E. Swanson (2006). Does Inflation Targeting Anchor Long-Run Inflation Expectations? Evidence from Long-Term Bond Yields in the US, UK and Sweden. Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Working Paper No. 2006-09.
- Lin, S. and Ye, H. (2007). Does inflation targeting really make a difference? Evaluating the treatment effect of inflation targeting in seven industrial countries, Journal of Monetary Economics

5. Global reserve accumulation
Many emerging markets (EMs) have been accumulating massive amounts of foreign reserve holdings. What are the motivations for this trend? What are its domestic and global repercussions; what are possible alternatives? How does foreign-exchange accumulation fit into different monetary policy strategies? What is the relationship between foreign-exchange policy, capital account openness and monetary policy?
- Aizenman, J., and H. Ito. 2013. Living with the Trilemma Constraint: Relative Trilemma Policy Divergence, Crises, and Output Losses for Developing Countries. NBER Working Paper No. 19448 (September). Cambridge: National Bureau of Economic Research.
- Aizenman, J., M. D. Chinn, and H. Ito. 2008. “Assessing the Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Measuring the Trilemma's Configurations Over Time.” NBER Working Paper #14533. Cambridge: National Bureau of Economic Research.
- Aizenman, J., M. D. Chinn, and H. Ito. 2010. "The Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Tracing and Evaluating the New Patterns of the Trilemma's Configurations", Journal of International Money and Finance, Vol. 29, No.4, p. 615-641 (2010).
- Cheung, Y.-W. and H. Ito. 2009. “Cross-sectional analysis on the determinants of international reserves accumulation.” International Economic Journal, Vol. 23, No. 4, p. 447-481.

6. Global saving glut, global imbalances and monetary policy
What are the chances, and what the potential channels for an adjustment of global current account positions and capital flows? What are the risks from such imbalances; and how important have they been in explaining the global financial crisis? How does the global saving glut relate to monetary policy, is it a cause or consequence or entirely unrelated?
- Chinn, Menzie and E. Prasad (2003), “Medium-Term Determinants of Current Accounts in Industrial and Developing Countries: An Empirical Exploration,” Journal of International Economics 59, 47–76.
- Lane, Philip R. and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti (2011), “External Adjustment and the Global Crisis,” IMF Working Paper WP/11/197, August.
- Bernanke, Ben S. (2005), “The Global Saving Glut and the U.S. Current Account Deficit.” The Sandburg Lecture, Virginia Association of Economists, Richmond, VA, March 10.
- Chinn, M., B. Eichengreen and H. Ito (2013): "A forensic analysis of global imbalances", Working Paper, University of Wisconsin.

Exam:
Term paper

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday, 04:30pm at University of Potsdam, Campus Griebnitzsee
Description:

Causal inference has become the predominant toolbox in empirical research. The aim of this course is to provide participants with a deeper understanding of microeconometric methods that allow to draw causal inference in many settings and discuss the most-recent advances. The course will have a block-structure where we first discuss causality based on the potential outcome framework. After a brief discussion of experimental methods, we will introduce different popular quasi-experimental methods such as matching, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables or regression discontinuity. We will discuss the identifying assumptions and the pros and cons of each method based on empirical examples. The lecture will also be complemented by practical computer sessions where the estimators will be implemented in STATA or R.

Topics:

  • Causality and the Potential Outcome Framework
  • Experiments
  • Matching
  • Difference-in-Differences
  • Instrumental Variables
  • Regression-Discontinuity Design

The course will be held in block structure between April 20 and July 10, 2020, with approximately seven lecture days (4 hours each) during the semester. The practical sessions – about six – will be blocked as well. Updated course information will be available by March 23 under https://www.uni-potsdam.de/de/empwifo/studium-lehre/aktuelles-semester.html.

PhD students are asked to register by April 13 via tuebbicke@empwifo.uni-potsdam.de.

Literature:
paper-based. For an introduction, see Imbens G, Wooldridge J. (2009): Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation. Journal of Economic Literature, 2009;47(1):5-86.

Exam Lecture: written exam (90 min)
Exam Practical Session: Presentations of problem sets, term paper

Credits:
12.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Dorotheenstraße 1, Room 4.05
Description:

Discussion of current research topics in financial economics.

Evaluation:
Seminar paper (100 %)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Wednesday,
08:30am to 10:00am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 203
Description:

The lecture deals with theoretical and practical concepts from the fields of statistical learning and machine learning. The main focus is on predictive modeling. The weekly tutorial applies these concepts and methods to real examples for illustration purposes. You are expected to work throughthe exercises for the tutorials. They will typically consist of proofs of theory and programming tasks like the implementation of algorithms.

The registration to the moodle course is obligatory.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
02:00pm to 05:00pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstraße 58
Description:

Course objectives:

  • Discuss advantages and limitations of structural econometric models. Give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important.
  • Provide insights into strategy (especially, identication) in important papers in structural Labour, Public & IO literature. Give a feel of how one may go about establishing a structural model.
  • Establish basic estimation techniques & numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation.
  • Develop matrix programming skills using Matlab. Loops vs. vectorisation; readability vs. speed; sustainable coding for several projects.

Evaluation:
If this course is taken for credits, the final grade will be determined by

  • 2 problem sets (to be completed in groups of max. 2 participants), weighted 1/3 each, and
  • a final exam, weighted 1/3.

Course location:
DIW Berlin, rooms as follows:
16.4. Friedensburg, 23.4. Friedensburg, 30.4. Popper, 14.5. Friedensburg, 28.5. 33002C, 11.6. Friedensburg, 12.6. Friedensburg, 18.6. Friedensburg, 25.6. 33002C, 2.7. Friedensburg, 9.7. tbd

More information can be found in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday,
09:00am to 12:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Elinor Ostrom Hall
Description:

The course will be postponed to the fall term 2020.

  1. Vector Autoregressive Models
  2. Vector Error Correction Models
  3. Structural VAR Tools
  4. Bayesian VAR Analysis
  5. Identification by Short-Run Restrictions
  6. Identification by Long-Run Restrictions
  7. Inference for Impulse Responses
  8. Sign Restrictions
  9. Identification by Heteroskedasticity or Non-Gaussianity
  10. Identification Based on External Instruments
  11. Structural VAR Analysis in a Data-Rich Environment
  12. Nonfundamental Shocks

Literature:
Lutz Kilian and Helmut Lütkepohl (2017), Structural Vector Autoregressive Analysis, Cambridge University Press.
Helmut Lütkepohl (2005), New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer-Verlag.

Time:
16×90 min lectures during the period 11-22 May 2020.

Location:
Elinor Ostrom Hall, 1.2.019, DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin.

Exam:
The grade for the course will be based on a paper which is due shortly after the end of the course. Details will be announced in class.

Please register via email to Juliane Metzner.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21a
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

Search and matching frictions as a fundamental and defining attribute of labor markets. Role of matching frictions in models of employment, unemployment, and other phenomena. Introduction to search theory in partial equilibrium settings. On-the-job search and wage distributions in general equilibrium. Models of wage-posting. Jovanovic's model. Implications for labor market institutions and macroeconomic analysis.

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 21a
Thursday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 25
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analysing time series data. The focus is on univariate modelling tools. The lecture begins with classical components models. Then we cover different types of stochastic processes like ARIMA and GARCH models, deal with the unit root methodology and procedures for forecasting as well as for the specification, estimation and validation of models. Multivariate extensions are demonstrated, with emphasis on vector autoregressive (VAR) processes and its application in causality and impulse response analyses. Nonstationary systems with integrated and cointegrated variables will also be treated. In the last session, a brief introduction to count time series, with particular emphasis in INAR(1) models and their applications, will be introduced.

In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data. We will intensively make use of econometric software packages.

Classical components models; stochastic processes; stationarity; ARIMA processes, GARCH models; specification, estimation and validation of models; forecasting; unit root tests; multivariate extensions: VAR processes, causality and impulse response analysis, cointegrated processes. In the tutorials the time series methods are applied to empirical data.

Literature:
Hamilton, D.J. (1994). Time Series Analysis, Princeton University Press.
Lütkepohl, H. (2005). New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer Verlag, Heidelberg

Exam:
written exam (90 min)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
09:00am to 05:00pm
at Haus Tornow am See, Oberbarnim
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical finance and macroeconomics. The course provides doctoral students the opportunity to present their own, preliminary research in these areas.

To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract to max.diegel@fu-berlin.de. Registration should take place not later than 31 May, 2020.

Exam: none

Credits:
2.00
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