Courses

Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 220
Thursday, 10:15am at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, Room 220
Description:

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms’ objectives and marketing activities. In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms’ objectives. In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data.

Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Literature:
There is no assigned (must buy) textbook for the course.

Exam: weekly or biweekly assignment AND take-home case work.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at SPA1, R21b
Description:

This course is designed for students and researchers who want to develop professional skills in modern quantitative finance. It is offered to interested students who have had some experience with probability, statistics and software applications but have not had advanced courses in mathematical finance. Although the course assumes only a modest background it moves quickly between different fields of applications and in the end, the participant can expect to have theoretical and computational tools that are deep enough and rich enough to be relied on throughout
future professional careers. The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of value at risk, option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree construction will be discussed in detail. Modern financial engineering techniques such as the Implied volatility (IV) models or State Pricing Densities estimation will be also discussed as approaches to resolve a shortcoming of the BS model.

Literature: Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p).

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analyzing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.

In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam: written exam (90 min).

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday,
10:00am to 01:00pm
at FU, Henry-Ford-Bau, Garystr. 35, Konferenzraum I
Description:

This course will take place from April 22 to 24 (sessions both from 10am to 1pm and from 2 to 5pm) at Freie Universität. It will be co-taught with Conchita d'Ambrosio (Università di Milano-Bicocca).

A preliminary syllabus is attached.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
12:30pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 23
Description:

Our internal Brown Bag seminar is open to all BDPEMS and RTG students. We recommend taking part from the second year on.

The seminar was initiated by the BDPEMS board as a traditional lunch seminar and is organized by the students themselves. It is integrated into the schedule of the "Brown Bag Seminar Macroeconomics" and takes place every other Wednesday from 12:30 to 2 p.m.

If you have any questions or if you would like to hold a presentation, please refer to one the organizers: derfelixarnold@web.de.

Upcoming presentations:

08.05.2013 Michael Raven: "Interfaces of Process Development in Biotechnology"

22.05.2013 tba.

05.06.2013 Anna Elek: tba.

19.06.2013 Davud Rostam-Afschar: "Taxation and Precautionary Savings over the Lifecycle"

03.07.2013 Michael Lee: "What explains house price dynamics in the U.S. real estate market?"

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, SPA1, Room 203
Thursday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, SPA1, Room 22
Description:

This course deals with advanced estimation techniques in modern econometrics. In the first part we study generalized methods of moments (GMM) estimation as well as pseudo-maximum likelihood techniques and their applications to different types of single-equation models and multiple-equation systems. If time, a brief introduction to Bayesian econometric methods will be given. The second part covers non- and semiparametric methods in econometrics. We will study basic Kernel density estimation, nonparametric regression techniques and estimation of partially linear and additive models. A deep knowledge of the techniques conveyed in this course is extremely useful since they are applied in various areas in modern econometrics, including time series econometrics, microeconometrics, panel econometrics as well as financial econometrics.

Literature:
Davidson, R. and MacKinnon, J.G. (2004): Econometric Theory and Methods. Oxford University Press.
Gouriéroux, C. and Monfort, A. (1995): Statistics and Econometric Models. Cambridge University Press, Vol. 1 and 2.
Härdle, W.K., Müller, M., Sperlich, S. and Werwatz, A. (2004): Nonparametric and Semiparametric Models. Springer-Verlag.
Hayashi, F. (2000): Econometrics. Princeton University Press.
Newey, W. K. (1993): “Efficient Estimation of Models with Conditional Moment Restrictions”, in Handbook of Statistics, ed. by G. S. Maddala, C. R. Rao, and H. D. Vinod, pp. 419–454. Elsevier Science.

Exam: written exam (90 min), two exam dates

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Spandauer Str. 1, room 21a
Description:

This course aims at equipping students with the skill-set to design and conduct empirical studies based on observational (archival) data in the fields of accounting and finance. After successful completion of the course students should

• understand the fundamentals and common pitfalls of quasi-experimental research design,
• be familiar with matching mechanisms, instrumental variable and panel data approaches which help with causal inference,
• be aware of limitations of these research designs,
• and, using the statistical software packages STATA and/or SAS, have gathered experiences in designing and conducting large-scale research projects.

Course format
The course consists of a combination of lectures, practical exercises, and student presentations of homework assignments. Lectures will be based on the relevant literature and on seminal as well as recent journal articles. Participants are responsible for reading the assigned materials before class and to hand in the homework assignments on time. The homework assignments will be group-based.

Literature:
Angrist, Joshua D. and Jörn-Steffen Pischke (2009): Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion, Princeton University Press.
Morgan. Stephen L. and Christopher Winship (2007): Counterfactuals and Causal Inference: Methods and Principles for Social Research, Cambridge University Press.
Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (2010): Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, The MIT Press.

Exam: group homework and written exam (one exam date: 08.07.13)

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Tuesday,
03:15pm to 05:45pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, ro0m tba.
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. Topics covered include: Effects of taxes and government transfers on labor supply and savings behavior of households; taxable income literature; welfare analysis of tax reforms; incentive and welfare effects of social insurance programs. Empirical approaches covered in the course include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies, such as “natural experiments”, treatment effects estimation, ex-ante policy evaluation and microsimulation.

Literature: Journal articles

Exam: final exam; research paper

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 136, Room MA 043
Description:

This master course is offered for Ph.D students who haven't attended an experimental economics course yet.

Please see the detailed course description at http://www.wiwi-experimente.tu-berlin.de/menue/studium_und_lehre/lehrver....

Requirements: PhD students are required to design an experiment (30% of the final grade) and describe this design in a paper no more than 10 pages. The design should be suitable to answer an original research question either from one of the topics covered or another (new) topic. A key part of the proposal (besides the design) will be a review of the current literature with respect to your proposal – explaining the way in which your research is novel relative to what has been done before.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Thursday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Description:

The lecture deals with the statistical properties of financial market data and econometric methods that can be used to analyze these data. We will study procedures to test for the efficient market hypothesis and become familiar with methods to model the mean and the volatility of financial data series. Besides the application of nonparametric and classical test procedures, the focus will be on time series methods and models. In particular, ARMA and GARCH models will be covered.

Credits:
9.00
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at tba.
Description:

This short course is organized by the RTG1659 and will take place from June 24 to 28, 2013 as follows:

June 24: 1-5:30pm, room 112, Spandauer Str. 1
June 25: 1-5:30pm, room 005, Dorotheenstr. 1
June 26: 1-5:30pm, room 005, Dorotheenstr. 1
June 27: 1-5:30pm, room 112, Spandauer Str. 1
June 28: 1-5:30pm, room 005, Dorotheenstr. 1

For more details please see the attached syllabus.

Credits:
5.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15
Friday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15
Description:

This course familiarizes students with classic questions and models in industrial organization. We first cover basic models of static as well as dynamic competition with applications to competitive strategy, mergers, collusion, managerial incentives, and trade policy. The course then analyzes in depth competitive strategies of vertical relations and control (B to B contracting) and introduces the extensive literature on two-sided markets. We also briefly discuss research on pricing when consumers violate classic assumptions on consumer behavior, e.g. erroneously analyze prices or contract offers.

The course starts April 17 and ends May 29th. During that time period, we meet every Wednesday and Friday from 9:00 – 13:00.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THE SEMINAR ROOM HAS CHANGED FROM 00.21 TO 00.15.

Course prerequisites: Students must have completed the first-year microeconomics sequence in the BDPEMS.

Grading/exams: The exact course requirements will be discussed during the first lecture as they depend on how many students participate in the class.

Literature:

We will prescribe numerous original research articles to read. Good textbooks on basic models of industrial organization are:
Tirole (1988), The Theory of Industrial Organization, MIT Press.
Belleflamme and Peitz (2009), Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies

The following textbook introduces questions of antitrust and economic models of competition that have been written to answer them:
Motta (2004), Competition Policy: Theory and Practice

The following textbook highlights implications of various consumer biases on market outcomes:
Spiegler, Ran (2011), Bounded Rationality and Industrial Organization

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Lectures and presentations on relevant topics of Innovation Policy: Development and economics of technology and research policies at national and European level; evaluation of Innovation Policy (best governance of the innovation system), introduction to empirical innovation research; external guest lectures on current topics in Innovation Policy by institutions of national and European Innovation Policy; papers and discussions of the participants.

Exam: 1 written exam at the end of the semester

Lecture: 10am-12pm
Tutorial: 2-4pm

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
08:00am to 12:00pm
at TU Main Building, room H 0111/H 0112
Wednesday,
08:00am to 12:00pm
at DIW Schumpeterhörsaal
Description:

First part: Frank Heinemann
April 10 to May 22, TU Berlin, Main Building, room H 0111/H 0112

Second part: Michael Burda/Alexander Meyer-Gohde
May 29 to July 10, DIW Schumpeterhörsaal

More details will be announced soon.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
09:00am to 12:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.21
Thursday,
09:00am to 12:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, room to be confirmed
Description:

The course Management Science II is divided into two consecutive modules: The first module encompasses intellectual property rights and the market for technology while the second module covers marketing models. Time I and Venue I above refer to the first module, Time II and Venue II to the second module.

Please refer to the downloads below for details (course outline and format, reading list, etc.) about the two modules.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Thursday,
04:15pm to 05:45pm
at FU Garystr. 21, HS 108
Description:

Wer sich mit moderner Finanzierungstheorie beschäftigt, stößt recht bald auf mathematische Begriffe wie "Martingal" oder "Filtrierung", die nur selten in der Ausbildung zum Betriebs- oder Volkswirt erläutert werden. Ziel dieser Veranstaltung ist es, eine Einführung in den dazugehörigen mathematischen Apparat zu geben und so den Einstieg in die aktuelle finanzwirtschaftliche Forschung zu erleichtern.

Diese Vorlesung ist formal äußerst anspruchsvoll und wendet sich nur an fortgeschrittene Studenten, die keine Berührungsängste mit mathematischen Begriffen besitzen. Da das Gebiet der Martingaltheorie sehr komplex ist, werden wir uns fast ausschließlich auf den mathematischen Kalkül konzentrieren müssen und können praktisch nicht auf die ökonomischen Anwendungen eingehen. Die Vorlesung findet unregelmäßig statt.

Die Vorlesung findet zunächst auf Deutsch statt, später im Semester dann auf Englisch. Aktuelle Informationen zu dieser Veranstaltung, auch zu Zeit und Ort, finden Sie ausschließlich hier: http://www.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/institute/bank-und-finanzwirtschaft/loeff....

The lecture will be held in German first, but is planned to be taught in English after a few sessions.

Click here to get more information or to sign up
Monday, 10:00am to Thursday, 06:00pm
at Spandauer Str. 1, room 112
Description:

This short course is organized by the RTG1659 and consists of 9 lectures:

April 8: 10am-12pm, 2-6pm
April 9: 10am-12pm, 2-4pm
April 10: 2-6pm
April 11: 2-6pm

The aim of the course is to some important models with heterogeneous agents and incomplete markets in macroeconomics, and to learn the tools to solve these models numerically.
Some prior experience in programming (ideally in Matlab, but sufficient knowledge in other programming languages would also be OK) is highly desirable.

To sign up for this course please use the sign up function.

Credits:
4.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.21
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at FU Berlin, Boltzmannstrasse 20, Room 328
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauerstr. 1, Room 203
Description:

This course is devoted to market failures and welfare economics. The first part focuses on the three classical conditions under which market outcomes lead to an inefficient allocation of resources: externalities, imperfect competition and asymmetric information. It addresses these questions both from a positive and normative perspective. The second part addresses fundamental issues of welfare economics from the perspective of a policy maker who designs and implements collective decisions. It focuses in particular on social choice theory, the foundations of bargaining and welfare economics, and mechanism design. The intention of the course is to familiarize students with the standard tools of modern economic theory and to train them in applying these tools to actual economic problems.

Literature:
Mas-Colell, Whinston, and Green (1995), Microeconomic Theory, Part III and Part V

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Locations:
ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.21 (April 8 to April 29, 2013)
FU (May 6 – June 3, 2013)
HU, Spandauerstr. 1, Room 203 (from June 10, 2013)

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Description:

This course is devoted to market failures and welfare economics. The first part focuses on the three classical conditions under which market outcomes lead to an inefficient allocation of resources: externalities, imperfect competition and asymmetric information. It addresses these questions both from a positive and normative perspective. The second part addresses fundamental issues of welfare economics from the perspective of a policy maker who designs and implements collective decisions. It focuses in particular on social choice theory, the foundations of bargaining and welfare economics, and mechanism design. The intention of the course is to familiarize students with the standard tools of modern economic theory and to train them in applying these tools to actual economic problems.

Literature:
Mas-Colell, Whinston, and Green (1995), Microeconomic Theory, Part III and Part V

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
02:15pm to 03:45pm
at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, Room 102
Thursday, 10:15am at FU Berlin, Garystraße 21, Room 101
Description:

Time/location: Thursdays at 10:15-11:45am in HS 101 and at 2:15-3:45 in HS 102, Garystr. 21.
The first lecture is on April 11, 14:15-15:45.

Participating students are expected to be familiar with basic time series analysis and methods of econometrics. The course covers advanced methods of modelling and analysing multiple time series. Students are introduced to the models, parameter estimation and specification of the relevant models. They will learn to use them for economic analysis and forecasting.

Contents:
- Review of univariate time series analysis
- Vector autoregressive (VAR) models
- Specification and estimation of VAR models
- Cointegration
- Vector error correction models (VECMs)
- Estimation of VECMs
- Cointegration tests and specifications of VECMs
- Structural vector autoregressive analysis

Literature:
H. Lütkepohl, New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, 2005.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

The course is designed to train students in the use of advanced methods of theoretical and empirical analyses of labor market regulations and to introduce them to the cutting edge of labor market regulation research. The focus will be on four topics:

Part I: Theory of Labor market imperfections (Burda)
Part II: Labor in Economic Development (Jayaraman)
Part III: Regulation of Markets for Education (Kübler)
Part IV: Theory of Labor Market Regulation (Schöb)

Please find more information in the attached syllabus.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, room 23
Description:

This course introduces students to the regulation of financial markets and the participants in these markets. It consists of four parts. The first two parts analyze the financial disclosure requirements of non-financial corporations and the impact of these requirements on corporate policies. The third part discusses the most relevant financial frictions that policy makers should consider when regulating financial institutions. Part IV reviews the economics of financial crises and discusses what regulatory mechanisms exist to prevent financial crises.

Part I: Financial Reporting and Disclosure (Prof. Gassen)

Part II: Recent Changes in Financial Markets Regulations (Prof. Adam)

Part III: Financial Frictions and Macroeconomics (Prof. Weinke)

Part IV: Macroprudential Regulation of Financial Markets (Prof. Heinemann)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Lecture: 12-2pm
Tutorial: 4-6pm

The lecture introduces standardization as a strategic tool in the economy and society, e.g. reducing barriers to trade, for the marketability of innovations and relieving governmental regulation. The relationship between standards and patents and the strategic options for their application are explained. Business and economic benefits of standardization are described and explained using a variety of examples.

Experts of standardization processes (business, academic, public authorities) are integrated as guest speakers in the lecture. Upon passing the exam the student receives the publicly recognized DIN Certification "Normungsexperte" (Modul 1). Short introduction to the topic: Tuesday, April 9th, 2013, 09:00 - 10:00, room EB 202.

Literature:
1 written exam at the end of the semester

Tutorial:
Gather practical experiences: Participate in events of DIN (workshops, seminars, conferences) and sessions of technical committees (national, European and international) in standardization.

Four block courses (some half day and some full day) once a month (October 2013 - February 2014) after deciding on topics and dates, including generation of a report. A broad variety of topics and dates from the standardization sessions are available.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Wednesday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at FU, Garystr. 21, Lecture hall 104a (April 17, May 8 and 29: 102!)
Thursday,
10:15am to 11:45pm
at FU, Garystr. 21, Lecture hall 104a
Description:

• Fundamentals of Taxation
• Taxation and Labor Supply
• The Excess Burden of Taxation
• Tax Incidence
• Optimal Direct Taxation
• Optimal Indirect Taxation
• The Effects of Taxation on Savings
• Taxation and Risk Taking
• Taxation and Investment
• Taxation and Capital Structure
• Tax Evasion

Literature:
• Salanié, Bernard (2011): "The Economics of Taxation", 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
• Further literature references will be provided during class.

Exam:
Final written exam.

Credits:
9.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

The course reviews the main topics and models of the incentive theory. It focuses on the principal-agent paradigm where the principal delegates an action to a single agent through the take-it-or-leave-it offer of a contract. Major topics are represented by the problem of adverse selection, which occurs when the agent learns some piece of information relevant to the contractual relationship, and the problem of moral hazard, which appears as soon as the agent’s actions are not observable. First, the trade-offs that emerge in these contexts are characterized: the rent extraction-efficiency trade-off under adverse selection and the trade-offs between the extraction of limited liability rent and efficiency and also between insurance and efficiency under moral hazard. Then, extensions of the basic framework to more complex environments are discussed. Mixed models with adverse selection, moral hazard and nonverifiability of the state of the world are also treated. Principal-agent models with adverse selection and moral hazard are finally considered in a dynamic context.

Literature:
Laffont/Martimore, "The Theory of Incentives: The Principal-Agent Model", 2001
Bolton/Dewatripont, "Contract Theory", 2005
Salanié, "The Economics of Contracts", 2005
Macho-Stadler, Perez-Castrillo, "An Introduction to the Economics of Information: Incentives and Contracts", 2001
Mas-Colell, Whinston, Green, "Microeconomic Theory", 1995

Exam:
Written exam (90 min)

Please note: This course is offered mainly for master students, but is also open for BDPEMS students.

Credits:
6.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Description:

This short course is offered by BDPEMS and will take place as follows:

June 10, 13, 17, and 20: 4-6pm
June 11, 12, 14, 18, 19, and 21: 2-4pm

location: SPA1, room 112

A preliminary syllabus is attached.

To sign up for this course please use the sign up function.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
at Haus Tornow am See
Description:

This seminar is intended to give participants exposure to state of the art research in time series econometrics and its applications in empirical nance and macroeconomics. The course is intended to engage doctoral students in first research projects in these areas to be presented during the seminar.

Please note that this is a block seminar!

Time and location: August 6-7, 2013 at Haus Tornow am See
- Arrival before lunchtime on August 6
- Departure in the afternoon of August 7

Registration:
To register for the seminar, you will need to send an e-mail including an extended abstract (about one page) to gunda-alexandra.detmers@fu-berlin.de. Registration should take place as soon as possible, but not later than April 30, 2013.

Requirements:
The seminar paper will be due two weeks before the date of the seminar. Papers can be preliminary.

Credits:
3.00
Click here to get more information or to sign up
Instructor:
Friday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at TU Berlin Main Building (Konrad Mellerowicz-Hörsaal), H 1058
Friday,
08:00am to 10:00am
at TEL 206_rechts
Description:

Estimating a causal effect or "treatment effect" from nonexperminatal data is the aim of much empirical research in economics. This course will cover the most important concepts and methods in this field from an applied perspective. The proposed schedule is (i) Rubin Model of Causality, (ii) Roy Model of Self-Selection, (iii) Causality and Regression Notation, (iv) Experiments, (v) Conditional Independence, (vi) Heckman Switching Regression, (vii) Instrumental Variables and Local Average Treatment Effect, (viii) Difference-in-Differences and Panel Methods, (ix) Regression Discontinuity Design.

The tutorials provide the opportunity to apply the methods covered in class to real data using the software STATA.

The course grade will be primarily based on the final exam. BDPEMS students also need to submit a referee report on a paper that attempts to estimate a causal effect by applying one of the methods presented in class. Many suitable papers can be found on the current and past seminar schedule at http://www.arbeitsmarktforschung.net/.

Literature: Mostly Harmless Econometrics by Angrist and Pischke

Tutorial: Fr 8-10, starting in week 2

Exam: 1 written exam at the end

Credits:
6.00
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