Courses

Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at DOR 1 , 3.04
Tuesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at DOR 1 , 3.04
Description:

This course links the fundamentals of corporate finance to its current frontier of research. Based on discussions of both theoretical and empirical papers, its focus lies on capital structure, investment decisions, corporate governance and cash and payout policies. It starts with the seminal classics shaping modern corporate-finance theory and is designed to prepare students for research in the field. Students will acquire in-depth familiarity with the standard models as well as the application of econometric techniques, and implement some in the bi-weekly accompanying tutorials.

Literatur:
Academic articles in the area of corporate finance

Exam: 90 min (100%)

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at SPA1, 125
Description:

Tutorials: Tuesday (14-16) or Wednesday (16-18)

Venue of tutorials: SPA1, 21a

The course deals with patterns of international trade, both in theory and empirics. Starting with the classic Ricardian and Heckscher-Ohlin trade models, students will be ntroduced to modern models, such as Eaton & Kortum (2002), Melitz (2003) and Melitz & Ottaviano (2008). In the tutorial students will present recent selected papers.

Literature:Robert C. Feenstra: „Advanced International Trade “ (2003), Princeton University Press;
Jonathan Eaton and Samuel Kortum: “Technology, Geography and Trade“ (2002), Econometrica (Vol. 70, No. 5);
Marc J. Melitz and Giancarlo I.P. Ottaviano: “Market Size, Trade, and Productivity“ (2008) , Review of Economic Studies (Vol. 75).

Exam: Presentation (30 %, the presentation is mandatory) and written Exam (90 min, 70 %); two exam dates.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA 1, room 22
Description:

Wednesday 10.00 am ­ 12:00 pm
and Thursday 10:00 am ­ 12:00 pm, or 14:00 pm ­ 16:00 pm

Venue: Wednesday SPA 1, room 22; Thursday SPA 1, room 22 and room 23 (afternoon)

Evaluating marketing decisions and developing goal-oriented marketing strategies, e.g. maximizing firm profits, depend on the measurement of causal relationships between firms objectives and marketing activities.In this course, we discuss in depth advanced methods to empirically determine the causal relationship between marketing activities and firms objectives.In exercise courses students learn how to apply these methods to real data. Special attention is given to modeling the effects of marketing on sales and
market share data. In this course we also focus on discrete choice models for individual purchase data and aggregate sales data. Successful participation in this class will enable students to quantify the impact of marketing on key performance measures and to evaluate the success of marketing activities.

Literature:

1. Anderson, S.P., de Palma A. and Thisse, J.-F. (1992), Discrete
Choice Theory of Product Differentiation, The MIT Press.

2. Cody, R.P. and Smith, J.K. (2006), Applied Statistics and the SAS®
Programming Language, Pearson.

3. Dubin, J. A. (1998), Studies in Consumer Demand ­ Econometric
Methods Applied to Market Data, Kluwer Academic Publishers Group.

4. Franses, P.H. and Paap, R. (2010), Quantitative Models in Marketing
Research, Cambridge University Press.

5. Hanssens, D.M., Parsons, L.J. and Schultz, R.L. (2003), Market
Response Models: Econometric and Time Series Analysis, Kluwer Academic
Publishers Group.

6. Train, K.E. (2009), Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation,
Cambridge University Press. 1st edition is available here:
http://elsa.berkeley.edu/books/train1201.pdf.

7. Wooldridge, J.M. (2008), Introductory Econometrics, South-Western
Cengage Learning.

Exam: Weekly, biweekly or monthly Assignments 70%,
Take-home case work 30%

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at SPA 1 , 21b
Description:

This course is designed for students and researchers who want to develop professional skills in modern quantitative finance. It is offered to interested students who have had some experience with probability, statistics and software applications but have not had advanced courses in mathematical finance. Although the course assumes only a modest background it moves quickly between different fields of applications and in the end, the participant can expect to have theoretical and computational tools that are deep enough and rich enough to be relied on throughout future professional careers. The course starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of value at risk, option pricing and its probabilistic foundations. Next, numerical solutions via a binomial or trinomial tree construction will be discussed in detail. Modern financial engineering techniques such as the Implied volatility (IV) models or State Pricing Densities estimation will be also discussed as approaches to resolve a shortcoming of the BS model.

Literature: Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied 
Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 
978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)

Exam: Oral

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Str. 1, Room 22
Description:

The course aims at providing the basic concepts and methods for analyzing panel data. It begins with introducing different static panel models with fixed and random effects, and discusses the problem of estimation in these models. The course covers tests of hypotheses with panel data as well as techniques for serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, dynamic models and models for qualitative dependent variables.

In the tutorials the methods are revisited and applied to empirical data using the software STATA. A deeper insight into advanced methods and additional topics is offered by means of assignments, empirical studies and/or literature reviews.

Literature:
- Baltagi, B.H., (2005), Econometric Analysis of Panel Data, 3rd ed., Wiley, New York.
- Hsiao, C., (2003), Analysis of Panel Data, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press.
- Arellano, M. (2003), Panel Data Econometrics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Exam: written exam (90 min).

Credits:
9.00
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Wednesday,
12:30pm to 02:00pm
at SPA 1, room 23
Description:

Date: Lecturer/Topic

April 16, 2014: Lutz Weinke

April 23, 2014: Dorothea Kübler/Julia Schmid (WZB): Scarring effects and youth unemployment: A field experiment on recruitment decisions in Germany (joint with Heike Solga)

April 30, 2014: Philipp König (DIW): Asymmetric Information and Roll-Over Risk

May 07, 2014: Daniel Neuhoff: Generalized Exogenous Processes in DSGE: A Bayesian Approach

May 14, 2014: entfällt - Humboldt Forum Wirtschaft

May 21, 2014: Falk Mazelis

May 28, 2014: Felix Strobel

June 04, 2014: Jessica Oettel

June 11, 2014: Sebastian Böhm (Uni Leipzig): The Trickle-Down Growth Hypothesis Revisited: Publicly Financed Higher Education

June 18, 2014: Grzegorz Dlugoszekslot

June 25, 2014: Lorenz Klipper

July 02, 2014: Charlotte Senftleben

July 09, 2014: Hanna Wielandt

July 16, 2014: Kai Priesack

Mailinglist at https://www.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/professuren/vwl/wtm2/brownbag

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Thursday,
02:00pm to 05:30pm
at Eleanor Dulles Room (5.2.010), DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin
Friday,
09:00am to 12:30pm
at Eleanor Dulles Room (5.2.010), DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at HU Berlin, SPA1, Room 203
Description:

This course deals with advanced estimation techniques in modern econometrics. In the first part we study generalized methods of moments (GMM) estimation as well as pseudo-maximum likelihood techniques and their applications to different types of single-equation models and multiple-equation systems. If time, a brief introduction to Bayesian econometric methods will be given. The second part covers non- and semiparametric methods in econometrics. We will study basic Kernel density estimation, nonparametric regression techniques and estimation of partially linear and additive models. A deep knowledge of the techniques conveyed in this course is extremely useful since they are applied in various areas in modern econometrics, including time series econometrics, microeconometrics, panel econometrics as well as financial econometrics.

Literature:
Davidson, R. and MacKinnon, J.G. (2004): Econometric Theory and Methods. Oxford University Press.
Gouriéroux, C. and Monfort, A. (1995): Statistics and Econometric Models. Cambridge University Press, Vol. 1 and 2.
Härdle, W.K., Müller, M., Sperlich, S. and Werwatz, A. (2004): Nonparametric and Semiparametric Models. Springer-Verlag.
Hayashi, F. (2000): Econometrics. Princeton University Press.
Newey, W. K. (1993): “Efficient Estimation of Models with Conditional Moment Restrictions”, in Handbook of Statistics, ed. by G. S. Maddala, C. R. Rao, and H. D. Vinod, pp. 419–454. Elsevier Science.

Exam: written exam (90 min)

Credits:
9.00
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Monday, 10:15am at SPA1, various rooms
Description:

Schedule:

May 5: 10:15-11:45am (room 112)

May 6: 10:15-11:45am (room 224), 2:15-3:45pm (room 224)

May 7: 12:15-01:45pm (room 21B)

May 13 (NEW!): 10:15-11:45am (room 224), 2:15-3:45pm (room 224)

Credits:
3.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
03:00pm to 05:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Hs 104 Hörsaal
Description:

The aim of the course is to teach students how to interpret empirical research in public economics and to apply modern econometric methods commonly used in the field. Topics covered include: Effects of taxes and government transfers on labor supply and savings behavior of households; taxable income literature; welfare analysis of tax reforms; incentive and welfare effects of social insurance programs. Empirical approaches covered in the course include both structural and non-structural estimation methodologies, such as “natural experiments”, treatment effects estimation, ex-ante policy evaluation and microsimulation.

Literature: Journal articles

Exam: Final exam; research paper

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Tuesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at SPA1, 125
Description:

Tutorial: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
Venue of tutorials: SPA1, 22

The course deals with the economic development of Europe from the beginning of the First World War up to the current situation from a historical perspective. Key topics include the economics of the two wars, European hyperinflations, the Great Depression, the bloc-wise economic integration in Western and Eastern Europe, the Golden Age of Growth, the economics of stagflation, global integration and global imbalances in a long-run perspective.

Literature: Stephen Broadberry, and Kevin H O'Rourke (eds) (2010) "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe" , Vol 2: 1870 to the Present, Cambridge.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, MA 043
Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Tuesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at HU Berlin, Spandauer Straße 1, room 22
Description:

The lecture deals with the statistical properties of financial market data and econometric methods that can be used to analyze these data. We will study procedures to test for the efficient market hypothesis and become familiar with methods to model the mean and the volatility of financial data series. Besides the application of nonparametric and classical test procedures, the focus will be on time series methods and models. In particular, ARMA and GARCH models will be covered.

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at Dorotheenstr. 1, room 005
Description:

Instead of an exam, three two-page research proposals will have to be handed in (one for each course part). Please see the attached syllabus for more information.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
09:00am to 01:00pm
at ESMT Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15/00.33
Friday, 09:00am at ESMT Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.15/00.33
Description:

Course dates: April 16, 23, 25, 30 and May 02, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 28, 30
Time: 9:00 – 13:00.

This course familiarizes students with classic questions and models in industrial organization. We first cover basic models of static as well as dynamic competition with applications to competitive strategy, mergers, collusion, managerial incentives, and trade policy. The course then analyzes in depth competitive strategies of vertical relations and control (B to B contracting) and introduces the extensive literature on two-sided markets. We also briefly discuss research on pricing when consumers violate classic assumptions on consumer behavior, e.g. erroneously analyze prices or contract offers.

Course prerequisites: Students must have completed the first-year microeconomics sequence in the BDPEMS.

Grading/exams: The exact course requirements will be discussed during the first lecture as they depend on how many students participate in the class.

Literature:
We will prescribe numerous original research articles to read. Good textbooks on basic models of industrial organization are:
Tirole (1988), The Theory of Industrial Organization, MIT Press.
Belleflamme and Peitz (2009), Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies
The following textbook introduces questions of antitrust and economic models of competition that have been written to answer them:
Motta (2004), Competition Policy: Theory and Practice
The following textbook highlights implications of various consumer biases on market outcomes:
Spiegler, Ran (2011), Bounded Rationality and Industrial Organization

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
02:00pm to 04:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Reasons for governmental commitment in technology and research policy, tools of innovation political methods (e.g., Standardization, Basic Research); development and economics of technology and research policy at the national and European level; evaluation of innovation policy (Best Governance of the Innovation System).

For an introduction and a general overview on the topic, please refer to:
http://innovation-policy.net/compendium/

http://www.inno.tu-berlin.de/menue/studium_und_lehre/sommersemester_2014...

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
08:30am to 12:00pm
at TU Berlin, Main Building, room H 0112
at DIW, Mohrenstr. 58, Schumpeter hall
Description:

The first part (Heinemann) analyzes how future expected money supply affects the current price level, why money can be written in the utility function and what is required to determine a unique equilibrium with rational expectations. Turning to the foundations of New Keynesian Macroeconomics, we analyze why monopolistic competition leads to an active role for monetary policy, derive the forward looking Phillips curve and study optimal monetary policy.

Literature:

Part 1
Blanchard, Olivier J.; Stanley Fischer, Lectures on Macroeconomic, MIT Press, 1989.
Walsh, Carl E., Monetary Theory and Policy, 2nd edition, MIT-Press, 2003.
Woodford, Michael, Interest and Prices: Foundations of a Theory of Monetary Policy, Princeton University Press, 2003.

Exam: written midterm and final exam

See also the information on the website for this course. Part 1:
http://www.macroeconomics.tu-berlin.de/menue/teaching_-_lehre/adv_macroe...

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
09:00am to 12:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.21/00.17
Description:

Management Science II

April 17 - June 19, 2014: Innovation, intellectual property rights and the market for technology, Instructor: Stefan Wagner
June 26 & July 3, 2014: Demand estimation, Instructor: Michał Grajek
July 10 & 17, 2014: Factor analysis, Instructor: Catalina Stefanescu-Cuntze

Please see attached documents for details.

The course will take place in room 00.21 or 00.17, Schlossplatz 1. The session on May 8 will take place in room 'Bookshop'. The sessions on May 15 and July 17 will take place in room 0.35 Admin Building - please use entrance Breite Str. 1.

Starting time for this course is 9 o'clock s.t.

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
04:00pm to 05:30pm
at FU-Berlin Boltzmannstr. 20
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Instructor:
Monday,
12:00pm to 04:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.21/00.17
Monday, 12:00pm at FU, Garystr. 21, Room 105
Monday, 12:00pm at HU (Rooms tbc)
Description:

Instructors:
Paul Heidhues - ESMT, Schlossplatz 1, Room 00.21/00.17 (April 14 to May 12, 2014)
Helmut Bester - FU (May 19 to June 16, 2014)
Roland Strausz - HU (June 23 to July 14, 2014)

Description of the course:
This course is devoted to market failures and welfare economics. The first part focuses on the three classical conditions under which market outcomes lead to an inefficient allocation of resources: externalities, imperfect competition and asymmetric information. It addresses these questions both from a positive and normative perspective. The second part addresses fundamental issues of welfare economics from the perspective of a policy maker who designs and implements collective decisions. It focuses in particular on social choice theory, the foundations of bargaining and welfare economics, and mechanism design. The intention of the course is to familiarize students with the standard tools of modern economic theory and to train them in applying these tools to actual economic problems.

Literature:
Mas-Colell, Whinston, and Green (1995), Microeconomic Theory, Part III and Part V

Exam:
Final Exam (14.07.2014)

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
03:00pm to 05:30pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr.58, Friedensburg Raum 22008
Thursday,
09:00am to 06:00pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Schumpeter Hall
Friday,
09:00am to 06:00pm
at DIW Berlin, Mohrenstr. 58, Schumpeter Hall
Description:

Lecturer: Prof. Marcel Fratzscher, Ph.D.
Place: DIW Berlin, Schumpeter Hall, Mohrenstr. 58, 10117 Berlin
Time: April 23, 2014, 15:00-17:30 o'clock, Discussion of seminar topics
June 19/20, 2014, 09:00-18:00 o'clock, Presentation and discussion of seminar papers

Short description of content: This seminar requests each participant to prepare and present a seminar paper. The participants choose a topic that fits to the seminar title, which means that it shall deal with the European cirsis. Recommendable are topics, which analyze economic policy decisions (especially the monetary policy of the ECB) as well as the functioning of the financial markets or the contagion effects of the crisis.
The paper can be empirical or theoretical and shall orientate towards the academic literature in this field.
To allow an intensive dialogue among the students, the seminar is organized in block classes. Many topics are closely related to each other.

Restriction to participation: 15
Registration: Till 20.04.2014 by e-mail to mfratzscher@diw.de
Audience: Master students, PhD (BDPEMS, GC)
Organisatorisches:
MA: 6 SP, Modul: "Topics in Macroeconomics"
Exam: Seminar paper (10-15 pages, 70%) + presentation and discussion (30%)

Credits:
4.00
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Instructor:
Thursday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at K 005 Seminarraum UG (Garystr. 21)
Thursday,
02:15am to 03:45pm
at K 005 Seminarraum UG (Garystr. 21)
Description:

Participating students are expected to be familiar with basic time series analysis and methods of econometrics. The course covers advanced methods of modelling and analysing multiple time series. Students are introduced to the models, parameter estimation and specification of the relevant models. They will learn to use them for economic analysis and forecasting.

Contents:
- Review of univariate time series analysis
- Vector autoregressive (VAR) models
- Specification and estimation of VAR models
- Cointegration
- Vector error correction models (VECMs)
- Estimation of VECMs
- Cointegration tests and specifications of VECMs
- Structural vector autoregressive analysis

Literature:
H. Lütkepohl, New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, 2005.

Credits:
6.00
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Thursday,
09:30am to 01:00pm
at ESMT, Schlossplatz 1
Description:

Objectives:
This seminar aims to provide foundation knowledge in the Organizational Behavior (OB) field, including classic and contemporary theories, ongoing controversies, and ground breaking empirical studies. Drawing on multiple disciplines such as psychology, sociology, and communication, this course focuses on behavioral phenomena at and across individual, group/team/departmental, and firm levels, including attitudes, motivation, leadership, emotions, group processes, team effectiveness, creativity, and organizational culture, among others. The course also pays particular attention to different empirical approaches in the OB field, surveying a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods.

Overview of Class Sessions
(9:30 am – 1:00 pm)

1 – May 15 (Thur) Introduction to Organizational Behavior Research
2 – May 22 (Thur) Management Classics: Motivation, Organizational Commitment and Leadership
3 – May 28 (Wed)* Emotions in Organizations
4 – June 5 (Thur) Groups and Teams

June 6th 5 pm Paper proposal due

5 – June 12 Independent session (no class; office hour or appointment to be offered)
6 – June 19 Beyond What is Obvious

7 – June 26 Paper Presentation (Term paper due)

(Note: * Most class sessions occur on Thursday morning, except May 28th is Wednesday. The class schedule listed above is subject to change with notice. There is no “academic quarter” - please come to class on time. Visitors and speakers will be invited to the class. )

You will be evaluated by the following dimensions for this course:

Class Participation and Contribution: 35 %
Critique assignment: 15 %
Term paper and presentation: 50% (Presentation 15% and Paper 35%)

Credits:
4.50
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Instructor:
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at tba.
Description:

Please see the attached syllabus for more information.

Credits:
6.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at 005 Dorotheenstraße 1 (DOR 1) - (Besprechungsraum)
Description:

Research seminar in financial economics. No ECTS.

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Friday, 01:00pm at Alt-Schmöckwitz 8, Berlin-Grünau
Description:

Date: Friday, July 11

To blow fresh air into your brains before exams start BDPEMS organizes and invites to a canoe trip in south east Berlin.
No need to be a pro! We just paddel around, have a picknick and maybe take a bath.

Only requirement: You know how to swim.

We will meet at the water sports area of Humboldt-Universität at 1 pm and have about 3-4 hours on the water.

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Instructor:
Monday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at SPA1, room 23
Description:

Please register in the respective Moodle course, see http://lvb.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/Teaching_Moodle

In the second part (Statistics of Financial Markets II), the course focuses on quantitative methods in risk management such as Value at Risk (VaR) and backtesting. The implications of the current Basel II directive to the risk management of the financial institution are discussed. The students will be equipped with the knowledge of the standard time-series models ARMA, unit-root tests, ARCH and GARCH models that are essential for understanding the standard risk-management models e.g. Risk Metrics methodology. The advanced statistical methods based on the Copulae dependence concept, Extreme Values, Neural Networks as well nonparametric and adaptive methods are introduced and applied to the risk management problems.

Literature:
Franke, J., Härdle, W., and Hafner, C. (2011) Statistics of Financial Markets: an Introduction. 3rd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-16520-7 (599 p)
Härdle, W., Hautsch, N. and Overbeck, L. (2009) Applied Quantitative Finance. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-69177-8 (448 p)
Hull (2005) Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives. 6th ed., Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-149908-4 (816 p)
Härdle, W., Simar, L. (2007) Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 2nd extended ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN 3-540-72243-4 (456 p)
Cizek, P., Härdle, W., Weron, R. (2011) Statistical Tools for Finance and Insurance. 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Heidelberg. ISBN: 978-3-642-18061-3 (420 p)

Exam: oral exam (70%) and presentation (30%)

Credits:
3.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
12:00pm to 02:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Wednesday,
04:00pm to 06:00pm
at TU Berlin, VWS-Building, room VWS 128, Müller-Breslau-Straße 15
Description:

Standards and standardisation are ubiquitous. Successful examples are mobile telephones, which experienced rapid diffusion in Europe by benefiting from the timely release of the GSM standard, and laser technology, for which the German industry via early standardisation achieved a leading position both in Europe and worldwide.

We are aware of some of these standards like standardised paper sizes, standards in the www, plugs and sockets of electronic equipment, bolts matching nuts etc.. Other standards we may not be aware of like standards for the height of steps on a flight of stairs or standards for the safety of playground equipment.

Even though we might not be aware of all types of standards they both have an impact on our modern life and at the same time are important tools of strategic entrepreneurship as well as relevant for industry at large, policy and society.

In this respect, the relevance of standards can take many forms. Some are elements of the technical infrastructure of our society. Other standards facilitate the exchange of goods and services. Yet other standards provide users with a common terminology or accepted aspects of measuring and testing. Standardisation can be a channel of knowledge and technology transfer. Standards can contribute to the integration of economic areas, like the Single European Market, via their integration into the European health, environmental and safety regulations. Maybe most important from an economic and business perspective and at the same time surely the least understood aspect of standards and standardisation is their relationship to innovation. The reason for the lack of understanding of this relationship is mainly due to the fact that standards do not automatically spur innovation. Rather, certain aspects of standards can have a beneficial effect while others might hold the danger of reducing innovation. The discipline of standardisation research can provide valuable insights into this relationship and help to strengthen the positive aspects of standards and standardisation.

This series of introductory lectures will cover the topic of standards and standardisation from a holistic perspective integrating findings from the field of standardisation research on the relation of standards and innovation, the role of standards in innovation policy as well as practical knowledge about standards, standardisation and of standardisation work into a coherent curriculum. Students passing this curriculum will have a better understanding not only of the economic theories behind standards and standardisation but also will have a better understanding of how standards have an impact on the microlevel of companies, the macrolevel of the national, European and global innovation landscape, the relevance of standards in innovation policy or R&D policy and the relation between standadisation and regulation. Moreover, students will be introduced to the different institutions that make up the vast standardisation landscape at the national, European and international level, how these levels and institutions interact, which rules govern standardisation and how both public and private stakeholders can participate in successful standardisation work.

Lecture Schedule
Strategic Standardization

Date
Topic and Lecturer
15/04/2014
Introductory session, 09.00 - 10.00 a.m., Room EB 202
16/04/2014
Introduction (Blind/Mangelsdorf)
23/04/2014
Standardization System (Krukenberg)
30/04/2014
Standardization Process (Krukenberg)
07/05/2014
Standards Consortia and Fora (Pohlmann)
14/05/2014
Private Standards (Großmann)
21/05/2014
Quality Infrastructure (Denkler/Mangelsdorf)
28/05/2014
Reserach, Innovation and Standardization (Blind)
04/06/2014
IPR and Standardization (Pohlmann)
11/06/2014
Macroeconomic Impacts (Mangelsdorf)
18/06/2014
Microeconomic Impacts (Blind)
25/06/2014
Standardization Strategies (Mangelsdorf)
02/07/2014
Standardization Foresight (Blind)
01/07/2014
Standardization Policy (Blind), Exam Preparation
tba/07/2013
Exam, Room tba

Credits:
6.00
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Thursday,
02:30pm to 05:30pm
at Ferdinand Friedensburg Room 22008, DIW Berlin. On June 12 in R12026
Description:

This course discusses advantages and limitations of structural econometric models to give students an understanding of why and when adding structure is important. It also provides insights into strategy in important papers in structural Labor, Public and IO literature and establishes basic estimation techniques and numerical methods such as Simulation, Numerical integration and Discretisation. Besides of that, the course provides introduction to the matrix programming language MatLab.

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Wednesday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Lecture Hall 104a
Thursday,
10:00am to 12:00pm
at FU Berlin, Garystr. 21, Lecture Hall 104a
Description:

The course “Taxation” consists of a lecture (2 class hours) and problem class (1 class hour) as well as a literature reading class (1 class hour) about the economics of taxation. The lecture and problem class are primarily concerned with the microeconomic theory of taxation, e.g., optimal taxation theory. In the reading class, selected topics in the economics of taxation are further explored. We discuss theoretical as well as empirical papers.

The lecture and problem class cover the following topics:
• Fundamentals of Taxation
• Taxation and Labor Supply
• The Excess Burden of Taxation
• Tax Incidence
• Optimal Direct Taxation
• Optimal Indirect Taxation
• The Effects of Taxation on Savings
• Taxation and Risk Taking
• Taxation and Investment
• Taxation and Capital Structure
• Tax Evasion

Textbook:
• Salanié, Bernard (2011): "The Economics of Taxation", 2nd edition, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Reading list (examples):
• Atkinson, Anthony B. and Joseph E. Stiglitz (1976): The design of tax structure: Direct versus indirect taxation. Journal of Public Economics 6.1-2, 55-75.
• Bach, Stefan, Giacomo Corneo, and Viktor Steiner (2012): Optimal top marginal tax rates under income splitting for couples. European Economic Review 56, 1055-1069.
• Blundell, Richard, Mike Brewer, Peter Haan, and Andrew Shephard (2009): Optimal Income Taxation of Lone Mothers: An Empirical Comparison of the UK and Germany. Economic Journal 119.535, F101-F121.
• Cullen, Julie Berry, and Roger H. Gordon (2007): Taxes and entrepreneurial risk-taking: Theory and evidence for the US. Journal of Public Economics 91.7, 1479-1505.
• Dwenger, Nadja, and Viktor Steiner (2012): Profit taxation and the elasticity of the corporate income tax base. Evidence from German corporate tax return data. National Tax Journal 65.1, 117-150.
• Fossen, Frank M. (2009): Would a flat-rate tax stimulate entrepreneurship in Germany? A behavioural microsimulation analysis allowing for risk. Fiscal Studies 30.2, 179-218.
• Gentry, William M., and R. Glenn Hubbard (2000): Tax policy and entrepreneurial entry. American Economic Review 90.2, 283-287.
• Gruber, Jon and Emmanuel Saez (2002): The elasticity of taxable income: Evidence and implications. Journal of Public Economics 84, 1-32.
• Piketty, Thomas, and Emmanuel Saez (2013): A theory of optimal inheritance taxation. Econometrica 81.5, 1851-1886.
• Poterba, James M., and Andrew A. Samwick (2003): Taxation and household portfolio composition: US evidence from the 1980s and 1990s. Journal of Public Economics 87.1, 5-38.
• Saez, Emmanuel (2001): Using elasticities to derive optimal income tax rates. Review of Economic Studies 68.1, 205-229.
• Saez, Emmanuel (2002): The desirability of commodity taxation under non-linear income taxation and heterogeneous tastes. Journal of Public Economics 83.2 217-230.
• Wen, Jean-Francois, and Daniel V. Gordon (2013): An empirical model of tax convexity and self-employment. Forthcoming in: Review of Economics and Statistics, doi:10.1162/REST_a_00388.

Exam:
Participants take a final written exam (120 minutes). In addition, PhD students present research articles and actively participate in the discussions in the reading class. The written exam accounts for 2/3 and the presentation and class participation for 1/3 of the grade.

Credits:
9.00
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Instructor:
Monday,
02:00pm to 06:00pm
at - 22 Spandauer Straße 1 (SPA 1) - (Seminar- und Unterrichtsraum)
Description:

Search and matching frictions as a fundamental defining attribute of labor markets. Introduction to search theory in partial equilibrium. On-the-job search and wage distributions in general equilibrium. Models of wage-posting. Jovanovic's model. Incorporation of search-matching frameworks in general equilibrium models: Diamond, Mortensen/Pissarides, and other macro models. Implications for labor market institutions.

Specialization "Labor Economics" 2nd year

Credits:
6.00
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Monday,
02:15pm to 06:45pm
at SPA1, R. 112
Description:

The course will take place on the following dates:

June 30: 2:15-3:45pm, 4:15-5:45pm
July 2, 3, 7, 9, 10: 2:15-3:45pm
July 4,11: 10:15-11:45am

Credits:
4.00
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Instructor:
Friday,
10:15am to 11:45am
at TU Berlin Main Building, H 107
Description:

Estimating a causal effect or "treatment effect" from nonexperminatal data is the aim of much empirical research in economics. This course will cover the most important concepts and methods in this field from an applied perspective. The proposed schedule is (i) Rubin Model of Causality, (ii) Roy Model of Self-Selection, (iii) Causality and Regression Notation, (iv) Experiments, (v) Conditional Independence, (vi) Heckman Switching Regression, (vii) Instrumental Variables and Local Average Treatment Effect, (viii) Difference-in-Differences and Panel Methods, (ix) Regression Discontinuity Design.

The tutorials provide the opportunity to apply the methods covered in class to real data using the software STATA.

Credits:
6.00
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